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  • Where to buy a Surface RT

    Posted on December 14th, 2012 at 00:01 woody 5 comments

    Microsoft’s made good on its decision, announced Tuesday, to release the Surface RT to a wider array of retailers in the US, and added two retailing chains in Australia. In addition, one giant electronics retail chain in China, Suning.com, has been displaying and shipping the Surface RT since October 25, one day before it was released in the US.

    Staples is taking orders online, promising delivery in 3 business days. Staples says it has units available for purchase “at all Staples locations… as early as December 12.”

    Best Buy has been taking orders online for the past 24 hours, stating the units “Usually ships in 1-2 business days.” Best Buy stores are due to have the Surface RT in stock in all of their retail locations starting Sunday.

    In Australia, Harvey Norman is also taking online orders, “usually ships within 2 days.” The tablet is supposed to be available for your perusal “from Friday in most locations.” Harvey Norman only ships to Australia.

    Also in Australia, JB Hi-Fi has been officially announced as a distributor, but I haven’t been able to locate an ordering site, or verify details about retail availability.

    The Chinese-language version of Surface RT continues to be available at some Suning branches in China and Hong Kong, as well as online. Suning has more than 700 franchised stores in more than 150 cities in China and Hong Kong; Microsoft has contracted with the company to offer the Surface RT in 500 or more retail stores, ”dedicated areas in Suning’s retail stores to display and demonstrate Surface, with trained sales representatives to deliver a great experience for end-users of Surface.”

    Microsoft will continue to peddle the Surfact RT in all of its Microsoft Stores and Pop-Up Stores: five in Canada; one in Puerto Rico; and 60 in the US.

    If you can’t get to a Microsoft Store, and won’t be traveling to Australia or Hong Kong any time soon, you can order online from any of these sites:

    Microsoft US order page

    Microsoft Canada order page (in English)

    Microsoft Australia order page

    Microsoft UK order page

    Microsoft France order page

    Microsoft Germany order page

    The lowest-priced Surface RT appeared as “Sold Out” briefly on Microsoft order sites shortly after MS started taking orders in October. Both of the more-expensive versions remained in stock, and the least expensive version came back in stock shortly afterwards. None of the sites mentioned above currently list any of the three versions of the Surface RT as sold out.

    Sales figures remain a closely guarded secret.

    Microsoft still hasn’t said anything about availability of the Surface with Windows 8 Pro, promised for January, which is rumored to be appearing in late January.

    UPDATE 16 Dec: The Surface RT is now available in France, at the retail chain FNAC.

    UPDATE 17 Dec: Surface RT now available in UK, at John Lewis.

     

    5 responses to “Where to buy a Surface RT”

    1. But I don’t have Wi-Fi in the apartment building where I live. Is there a way around this (without leaving home)? The new Fred Langa piece in Windows Secrets talks about the unsafe routers for making a Wi-Fi network in one’s space (and it’s not clear at all to me without how to get Wi-Fi in one apartment). I have wireless broadband via a 3G/4G thingie plugged into a USB port.

    2. @Sanda -

      You can turn that 3G/4G connection into a WiFi connection by using a MyFi. Ask the people who sell you the 3G/4G service.

    3. Woody,
      Thanks. I’d been reading in your Windows 7 just before I came online this AM. Your info has me googling around and finding …Am seeking smallest least amount of irritant-producing (electric, magnetic or radio waves). Been lucky so far. Local 3G/4G carrier store has been helpful in setting up ISP with new laptop a couple of years ago. I really like that equipment gets smaller, “easier” to use (maybe – you think?)and cheaper. One note about your book, Windows 7 (all in one) for Dummies- Your stories are good and funny. Some of the information is still advanced for me, but I’ll get there….Am tickled with how far I’ve come in five years: from nada, nothing to little bit…

    4. @Sanda -

      Keep going. And if your ISP is helping you, stay with them!

    5. I still advise most folks who are used to Windows on the Desktop not to be early adopters of Win 8 RT tablets. You will have a steep learning curve. Ultimately, given the very limited state of MS Apps right now, the hassle just isn’t worth it for the limited uses which these RT tablets offer. They do not compare favorably with comparably sized iPads and Android devices. This includes the overall usability or end-user experience, which is sort of hard to quantify.

      More tellingly, the feel of the physical devices running RT so far is that they are made far less robustly than iPads. They seem like they may break more easily from ordinary dropping and other mishaps to which tablets are prone. And if you want to do any typing, test out the two docking keyboard options now available. These keyboards have been panned as difficult to use and flimsy in design.

      I’m just saying — try before you buy! And expect Metro Apps to be a major disappointment, even if you’ve had your expectations managed already by Woody and other tech writers.

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