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  • First sightings of the Win7 update block for Kaby Lake and Ryzen processors

    Posted on March 22nd, 2017 at 07:30 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    We have first sightings, and some idea of how the block will be implemented. But how to break the block?

    See InfoWorld Woody on Windows.

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    Home Forums First sightings of the Win7 update block for Kaby Lake and Ryzen processors

    This topic contains 66 replies, has 24 voices, and was last updated by

     radosuaf 1 year, 11 months ago.

    • Author
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    • #103296 Reply

      woody
      Da Boss

      Testing continues.

      UPDATE: We now have a confirmed sighting of the patch blocking notification on an A6-8570 processor, which is an older “6th generation” processor that should not be affected.

      Another UPDATE: Ed Bott reminded me that Microsoft’s support for Skylake processors is limited to the specific machines linked from this Microsoft help post. Upshot is that Win7 and 8.1 patches will work on those specific machines, and may not work on others. In particular, if you build your own machine with a Skylake processor, Microsoft has made no guarantee that it will allow you to install Win7/8.1 patches on it.

      I can’t find a similar list for AMD 6th generation processors. Please let me know if you find one!

      [See the full post at: First sightings of the Win7 update block for Kaby Lake and Ryzen processors]

      • This topic was modified 1 year, 12 months ago by
         woody.
      • This topic was modified 1 year, 12 months ago by
         woody.
    • #103330 Reply

      zero2dash
      AskWoody Lounger

      Just saw this on the [H] forum.
      https://hardforum.com/threads/microsoft-blocks-windows-update-from-being-used-in-windows-7-8-1-on-new-cpus.1927423/page-6#post-1042895227
      http://www.ghacks.net/2017/03/22/kb4012218-kb4012219-windows-update-processor-generation-detection/
      Apparently the March preview includes CPU detection technologies, which are flagging compatible processors as being not compatible. See attached screenshot, which is an AMD Excavator CPU, not Ryzen. That’s a supported CPU.
      http://www.cpu-world.com/CPUs/Bulldozer/AMD-A6-Series%20PRO%20A6-8570E.html
      According to CPU World, those were released September/October of 2016.

      Needless to say, don’t download or install the March preview update, and keep a far distance from the April updates when they drop until Woody says otherwise.
      This is going to REALLY muddy up the waters going forward….

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      3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #103354 Reply

        woody
        Da Boss

        Oh cheeeeeeezus.

      • #103360 Reply

        woody
        Da Boss

        This raises the question as to whether the A6 is a “Bristol Ridge” CPU. See https://blogs.windows.com/windowsexperience/2016/01/15/windows-10-embracing-silicon-innovation/#sx3JOlsDWDP2cOLL.97

        This HP support page:

        http://h20565.www2.hp.com/hpsc/doc/public/display?sp4ts.oid=10669599&docLocale=en_US&docId=emr_na-c05338054

        Says specifically that the A6-8570 will be supported.

        • #103387 Reply

          zero2dash
          AskWoody Lounger

          Yeah, Woody, I think you’re right; it looks like it may be a Bristol Ridge.
          I’m not finding much on this particular APU, but after trying to cobble together some info:
          – There are 28nm Carrizo and 28nm Bristol Ridge A6 CPU’s, the main difference between them being the DDR3 vs DDR4 support where Carrizo is the former, and BR is the latter.
          – My above CPU-World link claims the CPU core is Carrizo PRO, but says it’s not confirmed; CPU-Upgrade says it’s a Bristol Ridge PRO and lists several other CPU’s as possible upgrades (that are also BR PRO architecture).

      • #103368 Reply

        radosuaf
        AskWoody Lounger

        See attached screenshot, which is an AMD Excavator CPU, not Ryzen. That’s a supported CPU.

        Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 will continue to be supported for security, reliability, and compatibility on prior generations of processors and chipsets under the standard lifecycle for Windows. This includes most devices available for purchase today by consumers or enterprises and includes generations of silicon such as AMD’s Carrizo and Intel’s Broadwell and Haswell silicon generations.

        https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/18581/lifecycle-policy-faq-windows-products

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        • This reply was modified 1 year, 12 months ago by
           radosuaf.
    • #103336 Reply

      AlexEiffel
      AskWoody_MVP

      To me, it is very irresponsible for Microsoft to do that, as they just risk having more users not patched since there is probably no technical reason to block the unsupported CPUs from getting updates.

      Microsoft has a certain responsibility to not help the Internet becomes more riddled with defective software that can be easily hacked and used against others. Here, I think we have a case where they are acting purposefully irresponsible and unethical.

      It is one thing to not take advantage of the latest features of a CPU, it is another to block them for marketing purposes while making the rest of the Internet community less secure.

      Sure, maybe the issue won’t reach huge proportions has b suggested, but still, on a theoretical level, it is a new low in corporate greed and unethical behavior.

      Plus, can I say it is contrary to everything that made Windows what is is, the fact that it was an open system where everyone could create a new hardware, make drivers and be compatible with it? This is in huge part what made Apple much less appealing in the past and ended up in Windows dominating the personal computer world.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #103338 Reply

      JohnW
      AskWoody Plus

      MS originally announced their plans to do this a year ago, so it shouldn’t be a complete surprise to anyone.

      I don’t agree with the decision, but I sure wouldn’t have gone and bought 7th Gen Intel hardware knowing this was the plan, if I intended to continue running an older OS.

    • #103342 Reply

      anonymous

      The big question to me is, will folks with the affected hardware in the enterprise using SCCM still be able to update it, or will it just refuse to install?

      • #103393 Reply

        ch100
        AskWoody_MVP

        Have you actually worked in an enterprise with SCCM?
        Do you expect an enterprise with SCCM managed by professional systems administrators to use unsupported hardware like hobbyist end users might do?

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #103347 Reply

      cmar6
      AskWoody Lounger

      The Infoworld link is not working.

    • #103357 Reply

      Noel Carboni
      AskWoody_MVP

      which are flagging compatible processors as being not compatible

      That’s of course the kind of thing we are all so afraid of happening by allowing Microsoft continued control over our systems.

      How can they continue to be so blind to their own mediocrity in creating software? Doesn’t anyone there think anything people do with the OS is of importance any more?

      There MUST be posters company-wide in all of the Redmond campus that say things like “Don’t sweat the details! It takes too long!” and “Just do it – they’ll get over it!

      But there could be a silver lining. A company like AMD is not without some legal clout. Someone needs to start kicking Microsoft’s behind over every single one of these transgressions.

      -Noel

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #103374 Reply

        radosuaf
        AskWoody Lounger

        A company like AMD is not without some legal clout.

        AMD sells chips for Xbox consoles. Who produces them? 🙂

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        • #103548 Reply

          anonymous

          GlobalFoundries manufactures most, if not all of AMD’s chips.

      • #103462 Reply

        ch100
        AskWoody_MVP

        There MUST be posters company-wide in all of the Redmond campus that say things like “Don’t sweat the details! It takes too long!” and “Just do it – they’ll get over it!”

        Isn’t this the way how money is made nowadays? 🙂
        Why blaming Microsoft for doing what everyone else around seems to be doing?

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #103471 Reply

          radosuaf
          AskWoody Lounger

          ch100

          OMG, even 3-yr olds know they shouldn’t kick back another kid just because he or she kicked her first…

          If we put up with such behaviour, there’s no future for PCs.

          MSI H110 PC MATE * Intel Core i5-6402P * 2 x 8 GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 2133 MHz * Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1050 Ti D5 4G * Samsung 840 EVO 250GB SSD * Western Digital Blue 1TB HDD * Seagate Barracuda 1TB HDD * DVD RW Lite-ON iHAS 124 * Creative X-Fi XtremeGamer PCI * Windows 10 Pro 1809 64-bit
        • #103487 Reply

          Noel Carboni
          AskWoody_MVP

          Isn’t this the way how money is made nowadays?

          What, you mean by doing second-rate engineering, such as releasing patches that are poorly coded and tested? Sure seems like it.

          I prefer excellence myself, and I believe that the industry leader could take a higher road and benefit, NOT be hurt.

          -Noel

        • #103568 Reply

          anonymous

          oh, that makes it ok then.

    • #103365 Reply

      Noel Carboni
      AskWoody_MVP

      There’s a big-picture concept that needs to be discussed here…

      What is the value of ongoing updates from Microsoft for older operating systems?

      Patches from Microsoft traditionally have done two things:

      1. Fixed latent bugs.
      2. Patched security holes that have subsequently been discovered.

      Item 1 above is almost moot for Windows 7 and 8 systems. I have personally got both those OSs on hardware systems that run for months on end without fault, and on which application software runs quite reliably. In short: I don’t think there are a lot of latent bugs to be fixed. Not showstoppers anyway. People are using their older systems to get work done.

      Item 2 is kind of a special case of item 1 because folks feel a need for Microsoft to patch security holes so that malware is blocked. No one wants a virus or worm or ransomware to infect them. And we collectively don’t want a bunch of systems out there spreading malware to others.

      But let’s not forget that malware isn’t ONLY blocked by Microsoft’s having patched security holes. There are a variety of ways to block malware, and some not widely known are very, very effective. I personally have systems set up to where malware never even gets near infecting them, and I’m not blocked from doing the things others enjoy, so I know it can be done.

      And let’s ALSO not forget that Microsoft may actually be coding more security holes into its system with its patches. There’s no more guarantee they do perfect work on patches than they originally did! In fact we see plenty of new problems e.g., with the March updates. The plain fact is that we really don’t yet know whether those updates have opened any new security holes. For all we know, they may cause two new vulnerabilities for every one they fix. The mindset of a programmer patching a hole is WAY different than the mindset of someone designing a software package. That’s not insignificant! And look at the history… Has malware infection gone way down recently?

      Let’s not forget that XP didn’t just roll over and die when Microsoft stopped “support”. It was still in use at the medical lab I visited a few days ago.

      Lastly, patches are costing we users more and more time and effort. Not only because of technical trouble afterward, but because folks are now necessarily more wary, and are doing more things up front to try to protect themselves (Group B anyone?).

      And so item 2 becomes a question something like this:

      ———————————————————————————————————-
      If on a given system Microsoft simply doesn’t patch any further security holes in Windows 7 or 8, is the user actually worse off?
      ———————————————————————————————————-

      I don’t think the answer is cut and dried, especially given the changes we’ve seen at Microsoft lately. It’s something I think needs further discussion.

      -Noel

      7 users thanked author for this post.
    • #103375 Reply

      MrJimPhelps
      AskWoody_MVP

      I’m glad I bought my Windows 7 computer with a Haswell chip. There were still some available from Dell about a year ago.

      Group "L" (Linux Mint)
      with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
    • #103378 Reply

      radosuaf
      AskWoody Lounger

      ———————————————————————————————————- If on a given system Microsoft simply doesn’t patch any further security holes in Windows 7 or 8, is the user actually worse off? ———————————————————————————————————-

      I’d still prefer to have a choice to update or not.

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      • #103382 Reply

        Noel Carboni
        AskWoody_MVP

        And I’d love for you to have that choice. But I’m not in charge of the changes that are seeking to deny people of it.

        What I *AM* interested in is why people still think they want to update their older systems, when everything observed about Microsoft is that they’re going further and further down the road the kinds of folks who still run older operating systems don’t want to follow on.

        • Is it that people don’t yet realize what Microsoft is doing or becoming and are still optimistic?
        • Is it that people think that even though Microsoft has generally turned to the dark side there’s still good in it?
        • Is it that people don’t want to worry about details and would like to just turn over control to Microsoft (yet somehow they still don’t want Windows 10)?
        • Is it an unwillingness to let go of something that has always been a certain way?

        Why do you feel updates have value for you?

        I’m not being critical or judgmental; each person is entitled to their own opinions. I just don’t know what they are.

        I have used Microsoft software from the start and have personally always felt there was some value in keeping current, but I’m not unwilling to re-evaluate the balance between upside and downside and make changes in my policies. I’ve already made changes in managing my own Win 7 systems, and am currently not in any hurry to install current updates into Win 8.1.

        -Noel

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #103384 Reply

      anonymous

      I don’t’ see how this will turn out very well… if they are daft enough to be using something like CPUID to detect processor information/”generation”, then this would also potentially block patches on Windows 7 running on virtual machines where the host has the affected hardware.

      At least in VMWare I believe you can overwrite/mask the real CPUID by changing the specifications in the VMX files, assuming that is the method they are using, but that is a terrible hack that shouldn’t be necessary.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #103390 Reply

      BobbyB
      AskWoody Lounger

      Got this link for Martain Brinkman’s site its about an CPU update detection thinggy/update it may be of interest to you on the thorny question of updates and CPU’s http://www.ghacks.net/2017/03/22/kb4012218-kb4012219-windows-update-processor-generation-detection/

      • #103452 Reply

        abbodi86
        AskWoody_MVP

        “These previews are only available through the Microsoft Update Catalog”

        if he want to rant against Microsoft, at least get the facts straight 😀

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #103416 Reply

      Goofy
      AskWoody Lounger

      I have a AMD A10 processor.  How do u tell if it is a Ryzen or not?

      • #103422 Reply

        anonymous

        Ryzen will be released this month, so it is unlikely you have one. Run CPU-Z if you want to know what processor you are using.

    • #103453 Reply

      abbodi86
      AskWoody_MVP

      “But if Microsoft itself is going to disable Windows Update, who am I to argue?”

      Catch-22 🙂

      excellent closer Woody

      3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #103469 Reply

        ch100
        AskWoody_MVP

        “But if Microsoft itself is going to disable Windows Update, who am I to argue?”

        It was boring enough for the last 2-3 months. Imagine how it would be if this would be forever.
        We would have to focus on Apple Update, Chrome Update or Firefox Update then and most of the fun would be lost.
        🙂 🙂 🙂

        PS Watch out the imminent release of iOS 10.3 with the new Apple file system upgrade coming

        2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #103476 Reply

      anonymous

      WSUS offline community tool people! WSUS offline WSUS offline WSUS offline;

      disable “Background Intelligent Transfer Service” & “Windows Update” service, cheers

      • #103480 Reply

        PhotM
        AskWoody Plus

        Have you tried this? Can anybody else try this? It sort of sounds plausible????
        What about the WUA though? Don’t the MSU’s call it up directly?

        --------------------------------------

        1. Tower Totals: 2xSSD ~512GB, 2xHHD 20 TB, Memory 32GB

        SSDs: 6xOS Partitions, 2xW8.1 Main & Test, 2x10.0 Test, Pro, x64

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        Graphics Radeon RX 580, Neither Over Clocked

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        -----------------

        Best Regards,

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    • #103479 Reply

      Karlston
      AskWoody Plus

      I have a feeling that what Microsoft has done may be illegal in some countries.

      At least in this country (Australia), there are laws to prevent companies retrospectively changing Terms and Conditions to the detriment of the customer.

      If, when I purchased my Windows 8.1 license several years ago, there was nothing in the then T & C that gave Microsoft the right to change the support simply based on processor family, then to do so now and retrospectively is illegal and invalid.

      My Windows 8.1 license, regardless of whether it’s running on a Celeron 300 or on the fastest Kaby Lake i7, entitles me to the support I agreed to when I purchased the license. And that includes updates.

      And any general T & C clause like “And anything else that Microsoft decides” is worth less than any paper it could be printed on.

      Caveat: I am not a lawyer. 🙂

      Hanlon's Razor: Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by stupidity.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #103515 Reply

      john t
      AskWoody Lounger

      It does, at minimum, seem another ham-fisted attempt to force users into the Windows 10 aquarium.

      (I guess that is obvious to everyone else…)

    • #103533 Reply

      James Bond 007
      AskWoody Lounger

      Testing continues.

      UPDATE: We now have a confirmed sighting of the patch blocking notification on an A6-8570 processor, which is an older “6th generation” processor that should not be affected.

      Another UPDATE: Ed Bott reminded me that Microsoft’s support for Skylake processors is limited to the specific machines linked from this Microsoft help post. Upshot is that Win7 and 8.1 patches will work on those specific machines, and may not work on others. In particular, if you build your own machine with a Skylake processor, Microsoft has made no guarantee that it will allow you to install Win7/8.1 patches on it.

      I can’t find a similar list for AMD 6th generation processors. Please let me know if you find one!

      [See the full post at: First sightings of the Win7 update block for Kaby Lake and Ryzen processors]

      I read Ed Bott’s article (for once):
      http://www.zdnet.com/article/microsoft-begins-blocking-updates-for-older-windows-versions-on-newer-hardware/

      He said specifically that “(Skylake-based) Systems that aren’t on the supported list will lose access to updates for older Windows versions as of July 17, 2018.” If that is true, this means that Skylake systems (other than those on that list) running Windows 7 or Windows 8.1 will only receive security updates until July 2018, i.e. the support will be terminated 1.5 years early for Windows 7, and 4.5 years early for Windows 8.1 for those systems.

      It surely sounds as though my decision to stay with X99 will be a correct one as I intend to run Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 for at least several more years. I use VMware Workstation a lot, and it seems to me that this block may (will?) also affect Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 running in virtual machines under VMware Workstation on a Kaby Lake or Ryzen system as the CPU id of the host is visible to the virtual machines. That is simply unacceptable to me. I am aware that it may be possible to mask the CPU id of the host in the virtual machine but I would prefer not to do that.

      But at the same time I am also thinking about the point Noel said above, which is that “If Microsoft terminates updates for Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 for some PCs, is it actually a bad thing for those users?” I certainly would want a choice to get updates or not, but with the quality of Microsoft updates as it is now, I certainly will be willing to go without updates in the future if it becomes necessary for the stability and usability of my own systems.

      Hope for the best. Prepare for the worst.

      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #103547 Reply

      dave1977nj
      AskWoody Lounger

      Hopefully someone can write a program to trick Windows update into thinking it’s running a different processor so we can still update. Or look at the update code that blocks the Kaby Lake, Ryzen, and a few other CPU’s and see how it checks and bypass it.

      Why did Microsoft select these specific processors? They work fine on Windows 7 there are absolutely no compatibility issues at all. According to the Windows life cycle fact sheet the end of support is January 14, 2020. So if I get no security updates and my computer is full of security holes and something happens it’s on me then huh? Obviously Microsoft does not care about it’s customers. I have a genuine paid version of Windows 7 that is now useless your saying now. So here’s to you Microsoft! I may have no choice, but hey remember this? “Windows 10 free upgrade” well guess what I will get it for free I’m not paying for it!  🙂

      • This reply was modified 1 year, 12 months ago by
         dave1977nj.
    • #103553 Reply

      ch100
      AskWoody_MVP

      From Skylake systems supported on Windows 7 and Windows 8.1
      https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/11675/windows-7-windows-8-1-skylake-systems-supported

      These systems will be supported on Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 with all applicable security updates through the respective end of support dates. It is recommended that these systems be upgraded to Windows 10 as soon as possible.

      To me this is a red flag which says that nobody should use Windows 7/8.1 on Skylake, even if it is “supported”, except for the period required to plan for upgrading.
      Those who prefer to keep complaining instead of using their computer and fight for “the right thing”, may keep using Windows 7 / 8.1 on Skylake systems.
      Those more practically-minded who are interested in a good outcome for them, should follow what the article says.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #103561 Reply

        radosuaf
        AskWoody Lounger

        From Skylake systems supported on Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/11675/windows-7-windows-8-1-skylake-systems-supported

        These systems will be supported on Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 with all applicable security updates through the respective end of support dates. It is recommended that these systems be upgraded to Windows 10 as soon as possible.

        To me this is a red flag which says that nobody should use Windows 7/8.1 on Skylake, even if it is “supported”, except for the period required to plan for upgrading. Those who prefer to keep complaining instead of using their computer and fight for “the right thing”, may keep using Windows 7 / 8.1 on Skylake systems. Those more practically-minded who are interested in a good outcome for them, should follow what the article says.

        How in your understanding does it mean I should install Windows 10?

        To help provide greater flexibility for customers who have longer deployment timeframes to Windows 10, the support period for Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 devices on Skylake systems will be extended by one year: from July 17, 2017 to July 17, 2018.

        Also, after July 2018, all critical Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 security updates will be addressed for Skylake systems until extended support ends for Windows 7, January 14, 2020 and Windows 8.1 on January 10, 2023.

        Mainstream support for W8.1 ends on January 9, 2018. MS assures full support until July 2018 – i.e half a year after the deadline, where supposedly there should be only security fixes. Everybody knows there will be no feature updates to 8.1 anymore, so it does not really matter. Security fixes will be issued until 2023.

        As long as 3rd party software supports 8.1, there is no urge to install Malware 10.

         

        As to what Microsoft “recommends”: they’ve “recommended” to use Internet Explorer and Bing search engine for years. Did you follow their recommendation? 🙂

         

        BTW: Woody, have you seen the positioning of askwoody.com @ Bing? While Google after searching for “askwoody” returns “askwoody.com” as a first result, in Bing it’s not even on the first page :).

        MSI H110 PC MATE * Intel Core i5-6402P * 2 x 8 GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 2133 MHz * Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1050 Ti D5 4G * Samsung 840 EVO 250GB SSD * Western Digital Blue 1TB HDD * Seagate Barracuda 1TB HDD * DVD RW Lite-ON iHAS 124 * Creative X-Fi XtremeGamer PCI * Windows 10 Pro 1809 64-bit
        • This reply was modified 1 year, 12 months ago by
           radosuaf.
        • This reply was modified 1 year, 12 months ago by
           Kirsty.
        • This reply was modified 1 year, 12 months ago by
           Kirsty.
        • This reply was modified 1 year, 12 months ago by
           radosuaf.
        2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #103825 Reply

      Hugo
      AskWoody Lounger

      OT: I don’t find how to enable “Notify me of follow-up replies via email” without post.

      Meanwhile I did with this post…

      • #103835 Reply

        PhotM
        AskWoody Plus

        Edit your Profile >> Account Make sure your Email is Right.

        Then See The Subscribe Button on Topics and Posts a like. Start at Forums and just keep working down the Topic Directories that you are interested in.

        Now one can look in your Profile, under:

        Topics Started
        Replies Created

        Favorites
        Subscriptions

        In the future See Here for this Topics Place:

        AskWoody Central
        https://www.askwoody.com/forums/forum/askwoody-central/

        Welcome, Hope this helps 😀

        --------------------------------------

        1. Tower Totals: 2xSSD ~512GB, 2xHHD 20 TB, Memory 32GB

        SSDs: 6xOS Partitions, 2xW8.1 Main & Test, 2x10.0 Test, Pro, x64

        CPU i7 2600 K, SandyBridge/CougarPoint, 4 cores, 8 Threads, 3.4 GHz
        Graphics Radeon RX 580, Neither Over Clocked

        2xMonitors Asus DVI, Sony 55" UHD TV HDMI

        1. NUC 5i7 2cores, 4 Thread, Memory 8GB, 3.1 GHz, M2SSD 140GB
        1xOS W8.1 Pro, NAS Dependent, Same Sony above.

        -----------------

        Best Regards,

        Crysta

        • This reply was modified 1 year, 12 months ago by
           PhotM.
        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #103890 Reply

          Hugo
          AskWoody Lounger

          Finally find it!  (Top right corner of the topic).

          Thanks.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #103898 Reply

      anonymous

      For those with affected processors, radosuaf has given a method of staying in Group A at https://www.askwoody.com/forums/topic/windows-10-creators-update-rtm-build-15063-downloading-now/#post-103260.

      Here is my summary of radosuaf’s method:

      When you wish to manually use Windows Update or install a standalone .MSU Windows update file:

      1. If a monthly rollup from April 2017 or newer is installed, uninstall it.

      2. Go to step 1.

      3. Install desired update(s) (if any) that are not a monthly rollup.

      4. Install the desired monthly rollup.

      Note: I haven’t tested this method.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #103900 Reply

        PKCano
        Da Boss

        The offending settings are carried (now) by the March PREVIEW Rollup. That will be included in the April “Security Monthly Quality ROLLUP.

        So, if you install ANY Preview Rollup beginning with the one for March and after or ANY Monthly ROLLUP beginning beginning with the one for April and after, you will be installing the Windows Update blocker for the affected processors.

        • This reply was modified 1 year, 12 months ago by
           PKCano.
        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #103905 Reply

          anonymous

          Right. That’s why radosuaf’s method involves temporarily uninstalling the newer monthly rollups. My summary of the method didn’t include mention of the preview monthly rollups, but for completeness it indeed should have.

          • #104016 Reply

            radosuaf
            AskWoody Lounger

            Regarding radosuaf’s method

            That’s by no means any tested solution – it was rather thinking if this is possible. There are many more experienced users on this site (PKCano would one of the first that would come to my mind, actually) regarding these matters. Given that and the fact I’m not really willing to test it on VMs and surely not on my own computer, I’ll be closely watching their suggestions :).

            MSI H110 PC MATE * Intel Core i5-6402P * 2 x 8 GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 2133 MHz * Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1050 Ti D5 4G * Samsung 840 EVO 250GB SSD * Western Digital Blue 1TB HDD * Seagate Barracuda 1TB HDD * DVD RW Lite-ON iHAS 124 * Creative X-Fi XtremeGamer PCI * Windows 10 Pro 1809 64-bit
      • #104011 Reply

        anonymous

        Regarding radosuaf’s method, abbodi86 stated at https://www.askwoody.com/forums/topic/windows-10-creators-update-rtm-build-15063-downloading-now/#post-103376:

        “This sounds a very good plan

        but the only downsize is that, uninstalling/reverting WUA version to previous one wipes WU database (DataStore.edb), and needs to be rebuilt each time”

        • #105905 Reply

          Volume Z
          AskWoody Lounger

          It doesn’t happen with a Windows Update Client version from June 2015 or later installed – e.g. KB3138612 or KB3172605.

          Regards, VZ

          • #106226 Reply

            abbodi86
            AskWoody_MVP

            Verified?

            that should be great then 🙂

    • #103974 Reply

      walker
      AskWoody Lounger

      With a custom built Win 7, Home Premium, almost 3 years old, how do I find out which processor I am using?   All I know for certain is that it is an i3.  Being computer illiterate I have no idea how to determine which processor.    Does anyone have any ideas in such a situation??    I never expected to encounter the nightmare which has appeared with MS and its Win 10.     Any and all ideas most appreciated.

       

       

       

       

       

      • #103975 Reply

        radosuaf
        AskWoody Lounger

        With a custom built Win 7, Home Premium, almost 3 years old, how do I find out which processor I am using?

        Press Win+Break. Under “Processor” you will find “i3-XXXX”, where the first “X” is the generation – if it’s 6 or 7 you might be in trouble, 5 or less is OK.

        MSI H110 PC MATE * Intel Core i5-6402P * 2 x 8 GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 2133 MHz * Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1050 Ti D5 4G * Samsung 840 EVO 250GB SSD * Western Digital Blue 1TB HDD * Seagate Barracuda 1TB HDD * DVD RW Lite-ON iHAS 124 * Creative X-Fi XtremeGamer PCI * Windows 10 Pro 1809 64-bit
        3 users thanked author for this post.
        • #104035 Reply

          walker
          AskWoody Lounger

          @radosuaf:

          Thank you for your advice.    I’m not computer literate, however I did find the following information:

          Intel(R) CORE (TM)  ie-3240  CPU@3.40 GHZ

          It also shows “copyright 2009”.    Hmmm, it appears that mine is so much older that it’s “safe”  (I hope)??     Thank you so much for taking the time to reply.  Your help is very much appreciated!      🙂   🙂

          • This reply was modified 1 year, 12 months ago by
             walker.
          • #104042 Reply

            radosuaf
            AskWoody Lounger

            I’m not computer literate, however I did find the following information: Intel(R) CORE (TM) ie-3240

            That’s Ivy Bridge:

            http://ark.intel.com/products/65690

            You’re completely safe 🙂

             

            Unless MS change their minds, of course…

             

            MSI H110 PC MATE * Intel Core i5-6402P * 2 x 8 GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 2133 MHz * Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1050 Ti D5 4G * Samsung 840 EVO 250GB SSD * Western Digital Blue 1TB HDD * Seagate Barracuda 1TB HDD * DVD RW Lite-ON iHAS 124 * Creative X-Fi XtremeGamer PCI * Windows 10 Pro 1809 64-bit
            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #104055 Reply

              walker
              AskWoody Lounger

              radosuaf:   Thank you so much for the information about the CPU I am running and the link you provided.   This is a huge relief (IF MS doesn’t change its “mind” again).  I was unaware that these CPU’s all have “names” until now.   Very interesting.

              I sincerely appreciate the information you’ve provided for me.  I feel a little “safer” for now.  I admire your expertise and willingness to help others who are “totally lost” without this help!

              🙂  🙂

      • #103991 Reply

        PKCano
        Da Boss

        Start\Run
        In the box type msinfo32 – hit entern the first page of the system information, it lists the processor ID
        Google that ID and choose the mfg’s website for information.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #104037 Reply

      walker
      AskWoody Lounger

       PKCano:

      Thank you for your advice.    I’m not computer literate, however I did find the following information:

      Intel(R) CORE (TM)  ie-3240  CPU@3.40 GHZ

      It also shows “copyright 2009”.    Hmmm, it appears that mine is so much older that it’s “safe”  (I hope)??     Thank you  so much for taking the time to reply.  Your help is very much appreciated!      🙂  🙂

      Don’t know how to send to both of you, so ended up  trying to do separate messages.

      • This reply was modified 1 year, 12 months ago by
         walker.
    • #104040 Reply

      PhotM
      AskWoody Plus

      I maybe wrong, since I can’t guarantee I have seen and read every word.

      What I don’t believe has been said is BACKING UP ONES IMAGE FIRST???
      If one has done this it can be very easy to rollback to ones earlier IMAGE state

      Perhaps these Posts will help in this endeavor, WITH AN EMPHASIS ON BACKUPS.

      See:

      Microsoft Update Management and Maintenance of Windows Update for Updating and Upgrading
      https://www.askwoody.com/forums/topic/microsoft-update-management-and-maintenance-of-windows-update-for-updating-and/

      Paragon SSD and HDD Backup and Management Tools Free and Paid
      https://www.askwoody.com/forums/topic/paragon-ssd-and-hdd-backup-and-management-tools-free-and-paid/

      Managing and Maintaining a Windows OS Image
      https://www.askwoody.com/forums/topic/managing-and-maintaining-a-windows-os-image/

      I am hearing allot about wanting to get back to before, Image Backups facilitate this.

      Hope this helps somebody…..

      --------------------------------------

      1. Tower Totals: 2xSSD ~512GB, 2xHHD 20 TB, Memory 32GB

      SSDs: 6xOS Partitions, 2xW8.1 Main & Test, 2x10.0 Test, Pro, x64

      CPU i7 2600 K, SandyBridge/CougarPoint, 4 cores, 8 Threads, 3.4 GHz
      Graphics Radeon RX 580, Neither Over Clocked

      2xMonitors Asus DVI, Sony 55" UHD TV HDMI

      1. NUC 5i7 2cores, 4 Thread, Memory 8GB, 3.1 GHz, M2SSD 140GB
      1xOS W8.1 Pro, NAS Dependent, Same Sony above.

      -----------------

      Best Regards,

      Crysta

      4 users thanked author for this post.
    • #104299 Reply

      anonymous

      Can someone who has either a Kaby Lake or Ryzen system running ANY version of Windows please do something for the community:

      Could you install VMware Workstation and create a Windows 7 VM inside of it, to see what happens when you install the April 2012 Preview update?

      This information could be useful in getting a better understanding of how to possibly circumvent the block.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #104359 Reply

        anonymous

        I’m wondering if any of the following methods could possibly work to circumvent this:

        1. Create a “loader” similar to the well-known tool created by Daz for the purpose of piracy. (Not advocating piracy here, just using it as an example of a tool.) As I understood, the way it worked was to write to the MBR and load its own code to present a SLIC table to the operating system, which was not present in the actual system BIOS. If a new loader could be created which can spoof the cpuinfo presented to the Windows kernel as Haswell/Skylake or another AMD CPU, then it should probably successfully pass the Windows Update check. The downside to this method is that it would only work on MBR systems, not GPT, and it would only work with a native MBR (no third party whole disk encryption software).

        2. Hook into the Windows Update process and bypassing or returning a different value for its CPU check result. This would probably be the most universal fix since it would work on any partition table. However, it would probably only work with the current client, and would need to be updated if there was ever a newer Windows Update client released.

        3. Restoring the files for the old Windows Update client. I don’t know exactly what files and registry keys are changed in the April 2017 patch, and the fact that the update is cumulative makes it a little difficult to find out. Perhaps someone could reverse the cab files to find out. But if the old update client is installed, unless Microsoft FORCES the newer client in checking for updates, it should allow you to continue receiving updates. But, the old client would need to be restored each time a new WU client comes out. Also an sfc /scannow would overwrite the files. And it’s possible that Microsoft could break something in Windows Update, just like they did almost every month back in 2016, that would cause CPU usage to skyrocket unless you installed the new client.

    • #104442 Reply

      anonymous

      Not sure if anyone has thought of this, but say these updates to block updates have glitch and blocked updates all across the board, so then even supported hardware would be affected. Just a thought.

      • #104478 Reply

        anonymous

        This has actually already happened. I don’t have the exact source on hand because I’ve been browsing so many websites about this, but one person who got this update said that they had a 6th generation AMD CPU (not Bristol Ridge or Ryzen) and they were being blocked from getting updates.

    • #107723 Reply

      dave1977nj
      AskWoody Lounger

      Well even just the April Security only updates have the CPU detection. So what do I do now? Stop updating Windows or go to 10? (I’m on Kaby Lake)

      • #107783 Reply

        MrBrian
        AskWoody_MVP
      • #107784 Reply

        radosuaf
        AskWoody Lounger

        Regardless of what happens, I’d stay on 7/8.1. I’ll probably hit that wall in June or July and I don’t really care…

        MSI H110 PC MATE * Intel Core i5-6402P * 2 x 8 GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 2133 MHz * Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1050 Ti D5 4G * Samsung 840 EVO 250GB SSD * Western Digital Blue 1TB HDD * Seagate Barracuda 1TB HDD * DVD RW Lite-ON iHAS 124 * Creative X-Fi XtremeGamer PCI * Windows 10 Pro 1809 64-bit
        1 user thanked author for this post.

    Please follow the -Lounge Rules- no personal attacks, no swearing, and politics/religion are relegated to the Rants forum.

    Reply To: First sightings of the Win7 update block for Kaby Lake and Ryzen processors

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