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  • Microsoft patches buggy Windows 7 patch, KB 4039884 solves the dual-monitor rendering problem – UPDATE: It’s been yanked

    Posted on August 29th, 2017 at 07:15 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    It only took ’em two and a half weeks.

    Late Friday night, Microsoft released a hotfix for the dual-monitor rendering problem I described two weeks ago in Computerworld Two of this month’s Windows 7 patches cause second-screen problems.

    In short, if you installed either of the August Windows 7 security patches KB 4034664 (the monthly rollup, installed by Windows Automatic Update) or KB 4034679 (the manual security-only patch), and you have two monitors, the second monitor will start acting up. Günter Born had a full writeup, and Christian Schwarz not only nailed the problem, he wrote a “proof of concept” program demonstrating exactly what was happening and when.

    Friday night, with little fanfare, Microsoft released a hotfix for the problem. It’s KB 4039884, and it’s only available through the Microsoft Update Catalog. I only learned about it from an anonymous poster on AskWoody.

    If you’ve already installed the August patches for Win7, and you have multiple monitors, it would behoove you to download and install the hotfix.

    UPDATE: It looks like there are bugs in the bug fix. Who woulda thought? Get the latest in Computerworld Woody on Windows.

    ANOTHER UPDATE: Microsoft has pulled the patch. Without any offered reason or documentation, of course. Computerworld Woody on Windows.

    If that helped, take a second to support AskWoody on Patreon

    Home Forums Microsoft patches buggy Windows 7 patch, KB 4039884 solves the dual-monitor rendering problem

    This topic contains 80 replies, has 24 voices, and was last updated by  anonymous 1 year, 3 months ago.

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    • #130726 Reply

      woody
      Da Boss

      It only took ’em two and a half weeks. Late Friday night, Microsoft released a hotfix for the dual-monitor rendering problem I described two weeks ago
      [See the full post at: Microsoft patches buggy Windows 7 patch, KB 4039884 solves the dual-monitor rendering problem]

      5 users thanked author for this post.
    • #130737 Reply

      alpha128
      AskWoody Lounger

      Since I only have a single monitor, I installed the August 2017 Rollup (KB4034664) on my home Windows 7 machine today.  As I noted earlier, my employer pushed the same update out to my work computer (also single monitor) weeks ago, and I didn’t see any reason to wait any longer.  Everything went smoothly.

    • #130741 Reply

      Microfix
      AskWoody MVP

      Attention! MS-Defcon 3 imminent!

      ‘All hands at the ready for August patching captain Woody.

      WU, group A and MS catalog, group B.

      Groups C or W, as you were’  🙂

       

      | W8.1 Pro x64 | Linux x64 Hybrids | W7 Pro x64 O/L | XP Pro O/L
      • #130743 Reply

        woody
        Da Boss

        HA!

        Since there aren’t any malware outbreaks that’d be plugged by the August patches (at least, as far as I can tell), I figured it’s safe to wait and see what happens this Tuesday.

        At least they got fixes up for many of the buggy patches this month.

        6 users thanked author for this post.
    • #130745 Reply

      PKCano
      AskWoody MVP

      The download link to KB4039884 (hotfix for dual monitor bug) has been added to AKB2000003 for those who need it.

      Edit: Installing this hotfix has implications. See comments here and here before installing

      NOTE NOTE NOTE: KB4039884 (hotfix for dual monitor bug) has been removed from AKB2000003

      • This reply was modified 1 year, 3 months ago by  PKCano.
      • This reply was modified 1 year, 3 months ago by  PKCano.
      • This reply was modified 1 year, 3 months ago by  PKCano.
      6 users thanked author for this post.
    • #130757 Reply

      javacatpaul
      AskWoody Lounger

      FWIW I installed the said “fix” and then Windows Update came back and told me I had over 20 important updates and a few recomended ones that needed to be installed.  Apparently some of the files that are installed are rather old versions (dating back to aug of 2016), just a few are actually newer than 20aug17 (according to autoruns).  It does change many dll’s. (autoruns’ “compare” facility is great!).

      I did a a system restore to the point that this “fix” made for me and and it’s back to the way it was.   It might be wise to hold off on this “fix” for a bit until this all gets sorted out…

       

      5 users thanked author for this post.
      • #130759 Reply

        PKCano
        AskWoody MVP

        I had the same result on one of my VMs.These old files showed up.
        Uninstalling the hotfix returns to previous state.

        Screen-Shot-2017-08-27-at-10.38.15-AM

        • This reply was modified 1 year, 3 months ago by  PKCano.
        • This reply was modified 1 year, 3 months ago by  PKCano.
        • This reply was modified 1 year, 3 months ago by  PKCano.
        • This reply was modified 1 year, 3 months ago by  PKCano.
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        4 users thanked author for this post.
        • #130763 Reply

          anonymous

          Does anybody test this stuff?

          Never mind.  After all, we’re talking about Microsoft.  What was I thinking?

          4 users thanked author for this post.
        • #130783 Reply

          ch100
          AskWoody MVP

          We can discuss forever the fake Group B concept but the bottom line is that home users who don’t have the enterprise tools and the required expertise should never ever install manually updates not provided by Windows Update, but use only Windows Update and install all that is available with only the Optional updates open for discussion.
          Here is a good example of supersedence getting out of hand.

          • #130813 Reply

            DrBonzo
            AskWoody Lounger

            That point of view puts a lot of folks in a pretty tough spot, doesn’t it? I don’t want to start a fight here, but if I’ve got 2 monitors that don’t work because of a update, then I want that fixed. If there’s another patch available that will fix the problem, then I want it. But you seem to be saying “That’s just too bad, you have to wait until the patch comes down through Windows Update.” And when was the last time my Windows Update worked correctly? On the machine I’m using at this moment, it’s glitchy at best. On previous machines the only thing it did was search constantly for updates, requiring me to totally shut it down and manually search for and install updates.

            5 users thanked author for this post.
            • #130816 Reply

              ch100
              AskWoody MVP

              If you cannot scan for updates, then you have a bigger system problem, don’t you?
              How is it that most if not all people with operating system problems follow their own unsupported procedures? The monitor issue is easily resolved by reordering the monitors in the “normal” order, you don’t need a patch to resolve this problem. Anyway, follow whatever updating mechanism you desire. ?
              You have all the information which is needed.

            • #130833 Reply

              DrBonzo
              AskWoody Lounger

              Perhaps I do have a bigger system problem. But no matter how far down the road you kick the can, my point about your point of view is still valid. In other words, whether the problem is a broken Windows Update or a system broken at a higher level, you seem to be saying that I need to rely on MS to take care of my problem, whether it be waiting until a patch comes down through Windows Update or following some MS-supported procedures for dealing with updates or fixing my system problems.

              The problem with relying on MS is that I can’t rely on MS! That’s because they either won’t or can’t deal with these problems. It’s clear that MS has a track record of messing up patches and updates. Do the phrases “supersedence getting out of hand” or “unintended release” sound familiar? As for bigger system problems, I’ve had clean installs of Win 7 done by IT pros. Sooner rather than later, however, something goes wrong!

              Here’s an analogy. Suppose tomorrow morning you find your car won’t start. You call your local dealer hoping for solution to your problem. You get me. After telling me that you’ve removed the battery, I tell you “How is it possible that you don’t know you should have first checked the terminal voltage, then the alternator output, and depending on those results the voltage regulator function. You should have also put a load on the battery to see if it holds a charge. There are also some fuel system checks you should perform. Don’t make a service appointment because we’re booked for the next seven months, and we’re not at all sure we can fix your car anyway. But don’t worry, I’ll send you the repair manual for your car. Then you will have all the information which is needed.”

              So, am I doing something wrong in the way I deal with my MS problems? Indeed, maybe I am, but given MS’ track record, I have to fend for myself. In the car-doesn’t-start analogy, were you doing something wrong? Indeed, maybe you were, but given your car dealership’s track record, you have to fend for yourself.

              Finally, I should say it’s not you I’m irritated by, ch100. But I sure am irritated by MS!

              3 users thanked author for this post.
            • #130839 Reply

              MrJimPhelps
              AskWoody MVP

              The monitor issue is easily resolved by reordering the monitors in the “normal” order, you don’t need a patch to resolve this problem.

              Spoken like a true geek with years of experience. Most home users wouldn’t have easily thought of that solution. I know this to be true, because I have done desktop support for a very long time.

              And by the way, a patch is what broke it; why shouldn’t the user expect a patch to fix it?

              Group "L" (Linux Mint)
              with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
              4 users thanked author for this post.
            • #130845 Reply

              anonymous

              @ch100: (August 27, 9:54 pm) I ask: what is the “normal order”?

              1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #130853 Reply

              woody
              Da Boss

              I had a hard time with that, too. Microsoft’s note isn’t completely explanatory. I take it to mean that the monitor running most of your programs is listed as #1, and that other monitors are listed as #2 and beyond.

              2 users thanked author for this post.
            • #130863 Reply

              MrJimPhelps
              AskWoody MVP

              I’ve always taken monitor #1 to be the monitor to the left, with the number increasing as you move to the right.

              And it’s not always easy to fix “incorrect monitor” problems. After hassling with my monitors for a while, I finally got everything working correctly. The numbers are (left to right) 3, 1, 2. I left well-enough alone (i.e. I left the numbers like that), because I didn’t want another video problem to arise from my trying to get the monitors to be 1, 2, 3.

              I am never surprised if a user can’t resolve anything more than the most simple monitor problems, because it is sometimes confusing even to me, with my decades of experience.

              Group "L" (Linux Mint)
              with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
              2 users thanked author for this post.
            • #130924 Reply

              ch100
              AskWoody MVP

              I read this solution here on Woody’s blog, so this is not my “geeky” solution.
              I would say follow Woody’s explanation to which I would add that the primary monitor is the one on which boot happens. Some BIOSes have things messed up so there may be a different “normal” order than what appears to be logical. This would happen mostly with the add-on cards.

            • #131038 Reply

              MrJimPhelps
              AskWoody MVP

              I read this solution here on Woody’s blog, so this is not my “geeky” solution.
              I would say follow Woody’s explanation…

              How many regular folks read AskWoody? And of those who do, how many of them read every article, or remember what they have read?

              Most regular folks just want things to work; and when a patch comes down which “breaks” their monitors, they want Microsoft to fix it; after all, Microsoft broke it with their patch.

              This is what happens when the CEO of Microsoft believes that it is sufficient for the developers to do the testing, rather than professional testers.

              Group "L" (Linux Mint)
              with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
              2 users thanked author for this post.
            • #131085 Reply

              johnf
              AskWoody Lounger

              I ran into another issue with that update. We’re running Radmin (a skinned version of VNC) that one of our medical vendors uses to monitor multiple cameras, on a 4 screen setup. The patch involved froze the remote window once it was moved from monitor 1, which was a problem for the tech monitoring those patients.

              Once KB4039884 was uninstalled, the application worked normally on all 4 monitors tied to the one PC. I hid it (Windows 7), and made sure the PC would have to have updates manually done. Updates are normally tested by a division in out IT dept. before being released, but they don’t test on multi monitor systems <sigh>…

               

              1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #130818 Reply

            anonymous

            For myself, manually downloading the larger Windows 10 cumulative patches from the catalog has been the faster way to get them installed for the past few months. Windows Update has the habit of fetching required data at dial-up speed even on a decent high speed connection.

            If Windows Update begins to use the smaller delta update packs, I’ll be happy to let it perform the work.

            I do not see the need for using Enterprise grade patch management software unless it will function on a Home version of Windows. Nor is their much common sense buying a Windows 10 Pro license just to potentially see it be whittled to become another withered lump of binaries.

            What will be the single user license price of Windows 10 Pro for Workstations, at least two hundred ninety-nine United States dollars? If Windows 10 Pro becomes a deprecated edition, would they “generously” offer an upgrade for a defunct Windows 10 Pro license to the Windows 10 Pro for Workstations Edition? Will Microsoft eventually start taking bits of feature sets out of Windows 10 Pro for Workstations in a few years and come out with another edition?

            You could still be a bit better at not telling off other folks because they aren’t using software tools they may not be able to afford right now or want and because of serious need to restore broken Windows functionality they didn’t do it your way.

            Back to the current Windows 7 problem, If the supersedence chain is mangled (Egads!) can a user just select those revived updates to install again and everything will be okay?

            2 users thanked author for this post.
            • #130825 Reply

              ch100
              AskWoody MVP

              Please read my post carefully. I am not suggesting that home users should buy expensive tools, but rather update Windows as intended.

              Back to the current Windows 7 problem, If the supersedence chain is mangled (Egads!) can a user just select those revived updates to install again and everything will be okay?

              Yes.

            • #130832 Reply

              anonymous

              They are updating Windows as intended. As intended by them when they purchased it and apparently also by MS back in the day. By which I mean doing what they can to select what updates to install (though that ability is heavily restricted now) and when, or whether to install them at all.

          • #130838 Reply

            MrJimPhelps
            AskWoody MVP

            We can discuss forever the fake Group B concept…

            The “fake” Group B concept? So it is not valid to try to have some control over what is installed on my computer? Suppose, for example, that a “home user” didn’t want their computer “upgraded” from Windows 7 to Windows 10, and so they turned off Automatic Updates? Would that have been a “fake” effort? And why would it have been “fake”? Because we’re just supposed to trust Microsoft? I learned very clearly that I couldn’t trust Microsoft when they forced Windows 10 onto my father-in-law’s Windows 7 computer AGAINST HIS WISHES. And they ALMOST forced Windows 10 on my niece’s Windows 8.1 computer — I happened to catch that one just in time. As obnoxious as Bill Gates was, at least you could trust him on automatic updates; Nadella is a totally different story.

            …but the bottom line is that home users who don’t have the enterprise tools and the required expertise should never ever install manually updates not provided by Windows Update, but use only Windows Update and install all that is available with only the Optional updates open for discussion.

            “…install all that is available” — say, for example, GWX?

            Just because Microsoft has decided to make this extremely difficult and confusing for even the experts does not make it a “fake” concept to try to have some control over what is installed on your computer.

            By the way, I have THREE monitors on my work computer. If we were still running Windows 7 at work, I would be very thankful for WSUS, which allows the customer to control which updates are pushed to the users.

            Group "L" (Linux Mint)
            with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
            9 users thanked author for this post.
            • #130903 Reply

              The Surfing Pensioner
              AskWoody Lounger

              I’ve come to the conclusion that certain individuals have a bit of an obsession with Group B – our philosophy tends to come under attack every time MS throws out a buggy patch (and here we have a buggy hotfix to fix a buggy patch!). I install patches manually where necessary and use WU regularly for relevant patches that will come down that chute, but I am very selective and very, very cautious about installing anything. I was following that procedure long before this website invented ‘Group B’ and I may still be following it long after these individuals have found something else to attack……………………….my age and my PC’s age permitting, of course. Why not: I’m still surfing problem-free!

              5 users thanked author for this post.
    • #130770 Reply

      Microfix
      AskWoody MVP

      Good Grief! Anyone would think that Microsoft is doing this on purpose to W7 & W8 in order to upgrade downgrade to W10 in order to see their adoption rates and market share increase globally.

      Need I mention the GWX campaign..oops already have.

      | W8.1 Pro x64 | Linux x64 Hybrids | W7 Pro x64 O/L | XP Pro O/L
      7 users thanked author for this post.
      • #130791 Reply

        abbodi86
        AskWoody MVP

        The same anyones would think that Microsoft doing worst than that with Windows 10 cumulative updates to get everyone to downgrade to W7 & W8.1

        6 users thanked author for this post.
        • #130804 Reply

          Microfix
          AskWoody MVP

          Fair point Abbodi86 🙂

          anyone for apples or penguins?

          | W8.1 Pro x64 | Linux x64 Hybrids | W7 Pro x64 O/L | XP Pro O/L
          3 users thanked author for this post.
          • #130840 Reply

            MrJimPhelps
            AskWoody MVP

            Penguins!

            Group "L" (Linux Mint)
            with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
            3 users thanked author for this post.
            • #130855 Reply

              woody
              Da Boss

              Speaking of which… I put together a $35 Raspberry Pi 3 for my son yesterday, and it’s breathtaking! If I have some time, I’m going to try going a day or two using only the Raspberry Pi and its Debian-derivative operating system, Raspbian.

              6 users thanked author for this post.
            • #130865 Reply

              MrJimPhelps
              AskWoody MVP

              I have been thinking about putting together a Raspberry Pi and connecting it to my non-Smart TV, and then adding a wireless keyboard and mouse to the Raspberry Pi, to make the non-Smart TV smart.

              The “smarts” would be in the Raspberry Pi rather than the TV, therefore making it a safer Smart TV, in my opinion.

              Group "L" (Linux Mint)
              with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
              2 users thanked author for this post.
            • #130867 Reply

              Microfix
              AskWoody MVP

              May I suggest optional OSes for the PI, either:

              Openelec or Libreelec (fork of Openelec from USA)

              giving you a far wider scope for multimedia 🙂

              | W8.1 Pro x64 | Linux x64 Hybrids | W7 Pro x64 O/L | XP Pro O/L
              • This reply was modified 1 year, 3 months ago by  Microfix. Reason: typo
              3 users thanked author for this post.
            • #130891 Reply

              MrJimPhelps
              AskWoody MVP

              I’ll need an OS which will allow Netflix to run. I have Linux and Windows at home; we have to connect a Windows computer to the TV in order to stream Netflix to it through the computer, because Netflix won’t work with Linux.

              Group "L" (Linux Mint)
              with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
              2 users thanked author for this post.
            • #130907 Reply

              anonymous

              @mrjimphelps ,
              .
              https://www.ghacks.net/2017/03/23/you-can-now-watch-netflix-in-firefox-on-linux/
              .
              The above may not apply to Firefox 52 ESR.

              Google do not support 32bit Chrome for Linux since March 2016. 64bit Chrome for Linux could play Netflix videos since long ago.

              The Chromium-based Slimjet browser for Linux can also play Netflix videos since April 2017.

              2 users thanked author for this post.
            • #130921 Reply

              MrJimPhelps
              AskWoody MVP

              I’ll try that real soon. I have an old computer which has 32-bit Xubuntu, so I hope it will work. If not, perhaps I can try a Raspberry Pi with 64-bit Linux.

              Thanks for the info.

              Group "L" (Linux Mint)
              with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
            • #131036 Reply

              johnf
              AskWoody Lounger

              Netflix should work fine with the latest versions of Chrome/Firefox. I’m viewing it with Linux Mint 18.01 XFCE (Should correspond with Ubuntu 16.04). It also should work with Firefox for windows running under Wine (I use that mainly for viewing Turner Classic Movies, which has issues with Linux…you need to use an older version of Firefox for TCM, I use version 43, which installs fine under Wine.)

              • This reply was modified 1 year, 3 months ago by  johnf.
            • #130981 Reply

              anonymous

              Reply to #130865 @mrjimphelps
              You can opt out of most (all?) advertisements while being edified & satisfied learning how to get Netflix working with a Raspberry Pi computer. 🙂

            • #131043 Reply

              MrJimPhelps
              AskWoody MVP

              Netflix works on my 32-bit Xubuntu Linux computer with Firefox!

              However, it is horrendously slow. Therefore, I’ll have to either install a lighter version of Linux on my old computer, or get a Raspberry PI. I’m thinking that the Raspberry Pi is the way to go:
              * Already has an HDMI output.
              * Really small – can sit behind the TV, out of sight.

              I already have a wireless keyboard and mouse, so I can control the whole process while sitting on my couch!

              Group "L" (Linux Mint)
              with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
            • #131079 Reply

              anonymous

              … @ … MrJimPhelps, … … .,

              Lubuntu and Linux Lite are lighter than Xubuntu.
              You can try Anti-X or MX-16 too – a bit more tech knowledge needed.

              The lightest Slacko Puppy Linux can also play Netflix videos but an extra package for EME/DRM needs to be installed.

            • #131081 Reply

              anonymous

              I’m not sure if there is a 64-bit operating system for the Raspberry Pi 3, and there are still not any plans to start maintaining a 64-bit version of Raspbian.

            • #131132 Reply

              anonymous

              Ah sorry to keep on about this, but I just looked at Debian which does support 64-bit ARM (AArch64). I don’t have a Raspberry Pi 3 to attempt installing Debian.

            • #131166 Reply

              zero2dash
              AskWoody Lounger

              I have 2 microSD cards for my Pi….one is RetroPi and the other is Ubuntu MATE.

              I went straight for that instead of trying to run Raspbian since I’m more familiar with it.

              https://ubuntu-mate.org/raspberry-pi/

              1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #130854 Reply

            Jan K.
            AskWoody Lounger

            Uhm… penguins!

             

            Besides that, count me in as one of those, who suspects Microsoft deliberately sabotaging Windows 7…

            It’s simply the only way to get these jokes of patches to make any sense… no professionel software writer can keep on producing such poor quality, unless it’s a business decision to do so.

            And I think, it indeed is.

            7 users thanked author for this post.
    • #130862 Reply

      MrBrian
      AskWoody MVP

      I tested KB4039884 in a Windows 7 x64 virtual machine last updated in Sept. 2016. It replaces some files with older versions!

      Example:

      After installation of KB4034664 (August 2017 Windows 7 monthly rollup), shell32.dll in c:\windows\syswow64 is v6.1.7601.23806, of size 12,880,896 bytes, last modified on May 10, 2017. Then, after installing KB4039884 (the dual monitor patch), this file is v6.1.7601.18222, of size 12,872,704 bytes, last modified on July 25, 2013. Then, after installing 7 of the updates in PKCano’s screenshot, this file is v6.1.7601.18952, of size 12,875,776 bytes, last modified on August 6, 2015.

      Edit: javacatpaul noticed this already.

      • This reply was modified 1 year, 3 months ago by  MrBrian.
      • This reply was modified 1 year, 3 months ago by  MrBrian.
      3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #130881 Reply

        MrBrian
        AskWoody MVP

        What seems to have happened is that for some files KB4039884 installs GDR versions of files, replacing existing LDR versions of files. The good news is that uninstalling KB4039884 seems to undo these issues, and I recommend doing so if you already installed KB4039884.

        Technical references:

        What is the difference between general distribution and limited distribution releases?

        Windows Hotfixes and Updates – How do they work?

        GDR & LDR : The Next Generation

        Windows 10-style updating comes to Win7/8.1 (Note: I believe that the author should have said, “Microsoft’s next push for a standard platform is ensuring we’re all on Limited Distribution Release (LDR), as opposed to the current fractured system in which some patches come from General Distribution Release (GDR).”

        abbodi86 comment

        • This reply was modified 1 year, 3 months ago by  MrBrian.
        • This reply was modified 1 year, 3 months ago by  MrBrian.
        4 users thanked author for this post.
      • #130948 Reply

        MrBrian
        AskWoody MVP

        Some of the old file versions that are installed by KB4039884 likely have security vulnerabilities that were fixed in newer versions. Thus, installing KB4039884 probably exposes your computer to fixed security issues.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #131046 Reply

          abbodi86
          AskWoody MVP

          KB4039884 does not install “old” files

          the thing is, KB4039884 belong to the Monthly Rollup series, but it’s partial rollup, only have August fixes
          when it’s installed, it supersede the current Monthly Rollup (Security or Preview), which cause all components in the full rollup to be superseded, and the OS servicing stack automatically revert to old non-superseded components (whether from other updates or inbox sp1)

          bottom line, KB4039884 is a sloppy incomplete update
          they should have just release a normal small update with fixed win32k.sys

          5 users thanked author for this post.
          • #131052 Reply

            MrBrian
            AskWoody MVP

            Your explanation helps in understanding post #130953. 🙂

            For readers: abbodi86 is making a technical point that the update KB4039884 doesn’t contain the older files that are installed when installing KB4039884. Nonetheless, installation of KB4039884 does cause older files to replace newer files.

            • This reply was modified 1 year, 3 months ago by  MrBrian.
            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #131061 Reply

              woody
              Da Boss

              .. and uninstalling it seems to revert to the previous (newer) versions!

              2 users thanked author for this post.
            • #131068 Reply

              MrBrian
              AskWoody MVP

              .. and uninstalling it seems to revert to the previous (newer) versions!

              Right! :). I did a quick check of this for a few important folders yesterday by using the comparison tool SysTracer Pro. A free program that also might work for this purpose is System Explorer.

              • This reply was modified 1 year, 3 months ago by  MrBrian.
              • This reply was modified 1 year, 3 months ago by  MrBrian.
            • #131091 Reply

              Cybertooth
              AskWoody Lounger

              My head is spinning…

      • #130953 Reply

        MrBrian
        AskWoody MVP

        The file list in KB4039884 seems to grossly mismatch the files actually changed.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #130919 Reply

      anonymous

      https://www.askwoody.com/forums/topic/microsoft-patches-buggy-windows-7-patch-kb-4039884-solves-the-dual-monitor-rendering-problem/#post-130855

      Hey Woody, please keep us up to date on how this goes.  I love pie & am most curious about the contraption.  I’d toss a few bucks at one if someone I “know” tells me it’s worth it.

      • #131022 Reply

        woody
        Da Boss

        It’s definitely worth buying a Raspberry Pi 3 – I put a link to Amazon over on the right.

        Loads of fun. Breathtakingly easy. I’m not convinced I can do the things I normally do, with a $35 motherboard and a $125 mechanical keyboard, but I’m going to give it a whirl.

        If things ever die down. Right now, there’s no end in sight.

        5 users thanked author for this post.
        • #131051 Reply

          anonymous

          Sounds good.  I keep thinking this would be a great test to run on a couple of my older aquaintances that could do without the fuss.  Plus I’d love to fire one up for giggles & laughs to see how much it will take.  Thanks for the response, keep up the good fight.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #130930 Reply

      anonymous

      Installing KB4039884 deleted “D3DCompiler_47.dll” from my \system32 folder, causing Dell’s SupportAssist to fail. Uninstalling the update fixed the problem.

      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #130958 Reply

      MrBrian
      AskWoody MVP

      KB4039884 is not present at https://www.catalog.update.microsoft.com/Home.aspx anymore. We’ll see if a new version appears….

      • This reply was modified 1 year, 3 months ago by  MrBrian.
      4 users thanked author for this post.
    • #130963 Reply

      PKCano
      AskWoody MVP

      NOTE NOTE NOTE: KB4039884 (hotfix for dual monitor bug) has been removed from AKB2000003

      5 users thanked author for this post.
    • #130965 Reply

      Geo
      AskWoody Lounger

      Easy solution for Win 7 aficionados.  Amazon has has the Acer 34 inch monitors for $349.  Just install the  3rd party software.  Either Splitview or nVidia Grids.  Technically still a single monitor but should suffice for some people and not have to worry about the two monitor problem.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #130969 Reply

        anonymous

        If you are feeling nostalgic it can split a 4k monitor in to a collection of 1024×768 miniature monitors each with its own messy nest of windows. :p

        PS Oops, I made a error. In theory the software that was mentioned should be able to amaze and confound folks with such an odd configuration.

    • #131031 Reply

      MrBrian
      AskWoody MVP

      Microsoft yanks buggy patch of a buggy patch, KB 4039884

      • This reply was modified 1 year, 3 months ago by  MrBrian.
      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #131039 Reply

      Microfix
      AskWoody MVP

      Back to square one 🙁

      Thanks MrBrian, your investigations and tests have proved spot on once again 🙂

      | W8.1 Pro x64 | Linux x64 Hybrids | W7 Pro x64 O/L | XP Pro O/L
      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #131045 Reply

      Canadian Tech
      AskWoody MVP

      This kind of behaviour and bad management is totally unacceptable.  How far can Microsoft sink!!

      This is a company that no one can trust.  Their products are full of bugs and defects.

      Microsoft Windows Update is the biggest malware threat in the entire Windows ecosystem.

      CT

      5 users thanked author for this post.
      • #131106 Reply

        Jan K.
        AskWoody Lounger

        Hey! Don’t steal my trademark remark! 😀

        I’ve been using that semi-snarky expression a number of times here, but actually haven’t had any problems at all with Microsoft for “ages” now… one of the good things that come by simply ignoring updates for months and instead spend the time reading Woody’s blogs just for the fun of it.

        Saves you a lot of head scratchings and time!

        Wonder whether the software writers gets red cheeks or a pad on the back “atta a boy!”?

    • #131074 Reply

      lurks about
      AskWoody Lounger

      Was the hot fix even tested?

      • #131127 Reply

        Microfix
        AskWoody MVP

        @ lurks about, With the same scrutiny as the initial patch..

        | W8.1 Pro x64 | Linux x64 Hybrids | W7 Pro x64 O/L | XP Pro O/L
        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #131092 Reply

      BrianL
      AskWoody Lounger

      It is just the ineptness of the employees of MS plus there appearly no educated supervisors. Now, that tells us to wait and see for at least 60 days before letting them in our computers!

    • #131105 Reply

      MrToad28
      AskWoody Lounger

      I skipped July and will skip August. As long as the patches represent a significantly greater threat than attacks in a reasonably well-protected PC [Anti-virus, anti-malware, anti-spyware, anti-exploit, anti-ransomeware] I’m in hide-and-watch mode. [Windows 7, No 10’s current or contemplated].

    • #131112 Reply

      Charlie
      AskWoody Lounger

      I’ve been following the advice Woody gives and I’ve always waited at least 2, three, or more weeks before I go out on the limb and apply MS Updates.  Been doing this since the mid 2000’s.

      If Woody says a certain update has to be applied for security reasons, I make an exception in that case.  This has always worked for me even at my job where I was fortunate enough to be able to do the same thing years ago.

      I’m a Group B person and still haven’t ever had a problem, and computers are not my profession.  Thanks Woody (and now all your helpers).

      Win 7 Home Premium, x64, Intel i3-2120 3.3GHz, Group B

      4 users thanked author for this post.
    • #131124 Reply

      zero2dash
      AskWoody Lounger

      Penguins and group W, here I come.

    • #131118 Reply

      anonymous

      Is there any way to subscribe to a feed so I don’t have to keep coming here and checking the DEFCON level every day? I check every time Windows reminds me that there are updates available.

      • #131129 Reply

        DrBonzo
        AskWoody Lounger

        @anonymous FWIW, there is an amazing amount of useful information on this site, much of which should be useful in making decisions about your current and future computing needs. And, you’ll be treated very well by the folks here regardless of your level of expertise – all the way from total computer newbie to total computer expert. In other words, I’ve seen moderators (and others) walk a newbie through a multiday troubleshooting analysis with loads of highly detailed instructions, and also friendly debates among experts where there are so many acronyms flying around that my head spins.

        Just one persons opinion.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #131130 Reply

        Kirsty
        AskWoody MVP

        If you happened to have a Twitter account, you could receive MS-Defcon updates by following Woody 🙂

        PS While also not specifically for MS-Defcon changes, an RSS feed is available

        • This reply was modified 1 year, 3 months ago by  Kirsty.
        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #131137 Reply

        Elly
        AskWoody MVP

        Another way to be informed might be to subscribe to Woody’s Blog. Go to Lounge Forums. Click on the AskWoody Blog. Click on subscribe. You will get e-mails of any posts on the Home page. Woody always posts when it is time to get updated, there. You will get additional information you might not be interested in, but you will always know when to update your computer. Most of the other subscribe buttons are located a little differently, so I’m including a picture of what to look for.

        AskWoody-Blog-Copy

         

        Win 7 Home, 64 bit, Group B

        • This reply was modified 1 year, 3 months ago by  Elly.
        • This reply was modified 1 year, 3 months ago by  Elly.
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        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #131151 Reply

          Kirsty
          AskWoody MVP

          Interesting point @elly – I didn’t mention the blog forum subscribe option, as my subscription doesn’t result in receiving the relevant emails, like I get from my subscription to the Code Red forum, for instance…
          (sorry for going further off-topic) 🙂

          However, I think the subscribe option is only available to Loungers. Our anon would need to register, to take advantage of subscribing to forums, I believe.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #131177 Reply

        woody
        Da Boss

        I also post important developments on my Computerworld blog

        https://www.computerworld.com/author/woody-leonhard

         

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #131155 Reply

      MrBrian
      AskWoody MVP

      https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4039884 no longer exists, and references to KB4039884 in other articles have been removed.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #131417 Reply

      anonymous

      KB4039884 is online again as i.e. “windows6.1-kb4039884-v2-x64″ here: https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4039884/windows-7-update-kb4039884

      After installing, there are no “old” updates required in Windows update, so the superseeding chain seems to be fixed.

      Also the patch seems to actually fix the problem, irfanview is working as expected on all screens (including screen 2 configured on the left and higher than screen 1).

      1 user thanked author for this post.

    Please follow the -Lounge Rules- no personal attacks, no swearing, and politics/religion are relegated to the Rants forum.

    Reply To: Microsoft patches buggy Windows 7 patch, KB 4039884 solves the dual-monitor rendering problem

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