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  • Roundup of bugs in the November Patch Tuesday crop

    Posted on November 17th, 2017 at 07:36 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Patch Tuesday problems continue, with a new acknowledgment from Microsoft about a dot matrix printer bug, continued reports of Win10 1703-to-1709 upgrades, one unconfirmed report of a forced 1607-to-1709 upgrade, and a memory violation error with CDPUserSvc

    If you have an Epson dot matrix printer, you’re hosed. EVERY patch this month will kill the driver — and it ain’t Epson’s fault.

    Computerworld Woody on Windows.

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    Home Forums Roundup of bugs in the November Patch Tuesday crop

    This topic contains 115 replies, has 31 voices, and was last updated by  ky41083 4 days, 17 hours ago.

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    • #146025 Reply

      woody
      Da Boss

      Patch Tuesday problems continue, with a new acknowledgment from Microsoft about a dot matrix printer bug, continued reports of Win10 1703-to-1709 upgr
      [See the full post at: Roundup of bugs in the November Patch Tuesday crop]

    • #146040 Reply

      AlexEiffel
      AskWoody Lounger

      For the third month, nobody could work this morning in accounting. We have two VMs running an identical Windows Server 2012 R2. One of them, the domain one, stopped having its network card linked to the domain so nobody had any permission to do anything. To fix that, we need to go into the server using VMWare console, disable the network card, then re-enable it. The other server doesn’t do it, although the installation is almost identical and runs on the same hardware.

      This is so annoying. Every time there is a patch at night for the last three months, it does that. We never touch those servers. The only thing they do is enable us to run the accounting package. I would have thought it would have been fixed as running a standard domain controller on a very ubiquitous Windows Server version on the famous VMWare software on a very well-known hardware brand and doing nothing special, I wouldn’t be alone with this issue and Microsoft would have been noticed of the issue by now.

      3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #146046 Reply

        PKCano
        AskWoody MVP

        Have you considered going into the network card properties and reinstalling the Client for Microsoft Networks or some of the other protocols? This is software that could get messed up on one and not the other identical VM.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #146194 Reply

        Noel Carboni
        AskWoody MVP

        That’s the problem that’s not supposed to happen; everyone knows updates don’t disrupt anything, right?

        A long time ago I ran across a single NetShell command that can be used to reset the entire network stack…

        If you haven’t heard of this already, Google “Reset networking using netsh”.

        -Noel

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #146047 Reply

      davefox
      AskWoody Lounger

      Not understanding these forced upgrades to 1709.  I’m running 1703, CBB, notify in policy, and have no defer periods set, and I had no problems.  The available updates on the Windows Update page clearly reference updates for 1703.

      Did those getting upgraded see it under available updates on the Windows Update page?

       

      • #146072 Reply

        MrBrian
        AskWoody MVP

        Some have suggested that this happens only when the user manually checks for updates.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #146090 Reply

          woody
          Da Boss

          It’s also possible that machines are only being upgraded if they’re on the “white list” — the list that’s presumably maintained by Microsoft, including machines deemed to be ready for the upgrade.

          • #146106 Reply

            AlexEiffel
            AskWoody Lounger

            Maybe disabling telemetry in my case prevents me being on the white list and this has the nice side-effect of not forcing the update too soon.

    • #146059 Reply

      JohnW
      AskWoody Lounger

      Lesson learned!

      Running 1703 Pro here, since last month.  First patch Tuesday with the new 1703 Windows update options.

      Have previously, with 1607, disabled automatic updates in GPEDIT (sets the check for updates manual button in update settings panel), and used ‘wushowhide’ to control what ‘check for updates’ actually included in the download chute.

      This time, I had also set the button in Advanced Options to pause updates for 35 days.  But apparently this setting prevents ‘wushowhide’ from seeing the latest updates.

      So I decided to switch off the pause button, so that I could use ‘wushowhide’.  But guess what?  Mistake!  That started the download of the November updates automatically!

      Since I had taken a fresh image yesterday, I just let the updates roll.  I didn’t want to chance interrupting, or possibly corrupting, the update process in flight.  No sign of a forced update to 1709, so all clear!

      Installed updates, rebooted, and everything appears to be working fine.

      I think I will just leave the pause button ‘off’ from now on.  My ‘check for updates’ button is back in the proper place in the update settings panel now.  🙂

      • #146117 Reply

        zero2dash
        AskWoody Lounger

        My suggestion – it’s working for me so far:
        Use GP to set all the update settings, including deferral of Feature and Quality updates.
        If you set Quality updates to defer for 30 days, by the time they install, it will install last month’s patches (and 99.9% of the time by that time, Woody’s given the green light and the updates are safe to apply).

        I would not use any Settings or Control Panel apps/places for anything critical.
        MS has shown a habit in the past of ignoring or flat out reverting those settings, but they’ve yet to ignore or revert GP settings. (And they shouldn’t, because if they do, they’re essentially throwing up a middle finger to Enterprise and won’t be in business long.)

        I have everything set in GP in 1703.
        * Branch set to CBB (which is now SAC [not Targeted])
        * Feature updates deferred for 365 days
        * Quality updates deferred for 30 days

        I also have AU set to [2] Notify for download and auto install. This way, it doesn’t do anything automatically. Any time I actually look at updates, it’s either a Defender update, or, last month’s security rollup.

        Short of being behind WSUS or SCCM, this is the only way I think home users have a chance of any sanity running 10 while being secure AND stable.

        • This reply was modified 1 month ago by  zero2dash.
        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #146144 Reply

          JohnW
          AskWoody Lounger

          I hear ya, but I just set GP to completely disable automatic updates, so nothing ever downloads, until I click on “check for updates”.

          Am I missing something?

        • #146234 Reply

          walker
          AskWoody Lounger

          @zero2dash:  I’m assuming you are referring to Windows 10?

          I have no idea what the acronyms you have cited are referring to, however it always helps if you reference the OS you are referring to, as well as any interpretation of the acronyms you are referring to.   There are a lot of messages to review, so the additional information would always help.   Thank you for the message.    🙂

          • #146245 Reply

            Elly
            AskWoody Lounger

            Good morning Walker.

            1708 and 1603 are versions of W10. GP is for group policy, and GPEDIT is for making changes in group policy. Win 7 Home doesn’t have group policy, and I think that is what you are using.

             

            Elly-

            Win 7 Home, Group B

            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #146249 Reply

              walker
              AskWoody Lounger

              @elly:  Thank you so much for the great “translations”!!  I thought that it was Win 10, however was not familiar with the acronyms, which you have clarified extremely well.  I appreciate you taking the time to provide this information for me.   I can’t say that I “understand” everything, however hopefully I copy this for future reference.

              Yes, I’m a Win7x64, MS Home Premium, Group A, user.   Try to stay out of as many unnecessary programs as possible as just dealing with the update problems, and other issues are enough to keep us all busy.    Thank you once again for sharing your knowledge and expertise with all of the members.   It is very much appreciated, Elly!   🙂   🙂

              1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #146254 Reply

              Elly
              AskWoody Lounger

              @Walker- glad to be of some help. I know nothing of Group Policy other than it doesn’t apply to me, as a Win 7 Home user… so not an expert! Maybe expert at being a non-techy… if there is such a thing.

              Elly-

              Win 7 Home, Group B

              1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #146365 Reply

              Seff
              AskWoody Lounger

              @elly There certainly is such a thing, I’m a professional amateur in all things technical myself :)!

              1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #146305 Reply

            zero2dash
            AskWoody Lounger

            GP = Group Policy (gpedit.msc or local Group Policy in this case)
            1703 = Win10 “Creator’s Update” released 3/17
            1709 = Win10 “Fall Creator’s Update” released 9/17
            CBB = Current Branch for Business, instead of CB = Current Branch
            Those are now called SAC [Targeted] or just SAC.
            SAC = Semi-Annual Channel.
            SAC [Targeted] = CB
            SAC = CBB
            AU = Automatuc Updates (ie Windows Update)
            WSUS = Windows Server Update Services
            SCCM = System Center Configuration Management

            Some of these are enterprise terms (WSUS and SCCM especially) but most people who are in IT or follow it use the other terms, so you’ll see them often.

            2 users thanked author for this post.
            • #146388 Reply

              walker
              AskWoody Lounger

              @zero2dash:  Thank you so much for the great list you sent!!   I am making a copy of that for future refeence, and know that it will be very helpful.    I appreciate what you have provided, and I’m sure that all of the other members (who are computer illiterate as I am) do as well.  Thank you once again!     🙂  🙂

            • #146602 Reply

              MrToad28
              AskWoody Lounger

              Thanks for the abbreviation list…put it in my Win10 file in case of temporary insanity that causes me to buy a win 10 PC.. The complexity of the versions and what has to be done to keep it from being derailed by Microsoft boggles. I just hope there’s a more stable OS and management when the end of security updates forces me to update.

    • #146067 Reply

      anonymous

      Been trying for 15 minutes to register on this site so I can post a simple comment. I aways get a WordPress login screen, never a Set Password screen. Will try commenting unregistered.

      @alexeiffel, the network card losing Domain connection is likely not related to updates but to Network Location Awareness not working right after a reboot. It’s an annoying, persistent problem. I believe I’ve seen the suggestion to set that service to Delayed Start, though I haven’t tried it.

      I do keep a small batch file on many machines called RestartNetworkAdapter.cmd.  Once you know it works, you can run it from Remote Desktop to restart the adapter, without having to log in to the hypervisor. Adjust the text in quotation marks to the name of your network adapter, and run as Administrator:

      netsh interface set interface “Ethernet” disabled

      netsh interface set interface “Ethernet” enabled

      Mark Berry
      MCB Systems

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #146069 Reply

        PKCano
        AskWoody MVP

        Mark Berry.

        When you register you will receive a confirmation email at the email address you enter. (Sometimes it ends up in the spam/trash folder, so check there if you don’t get it.) Your first registered post has to be moderated.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #146092 Reply

          woody
          Da Boss

          We’ve also had sporadic problems with the site which should – should – get better over Thanksgiving.

          2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #146267 Reply

          mcbsys
          AskWoody Lounger

          Yes, I pulled it out of Junk and went to the “Password: Click to set” link. That brought up a logon screen asking for username and password (as opposed to a screen asking for just a new password). Of course I didn’t know the existing random password, so I couldn’t get in. Today, the same link brings me to a standard 404 page:  https://www.askwoody.com/not_found.

          Just tried the Reset Password cycle again. Received the email, clicked on the link, got to the screen asking me to enter a username and password instead of a reset password screen.

          Wait! I see the problem. The link in both emails is malformed:  it includes two question marks:

          https://www.askwoody.com/wp-login.php?itsec-hb-token=awadmin17?action=rp&key=SecretKey123&login=user101

          Once I changed the second question mark to an ampersand, it worked and I was able to set my password:

          https://www.askwoody.com/wp-login.php?itsec-hb-token=awadmin17&action=rp&key=SecretKey123&login=user101

          • #146269 Reply

            PKCano
            AskWoody MVP

            Well, welcome aboard, Mark Berry!

            Realize the site is having problems. We will be down over the Thanksgiving break for upgrade. In the meantime, bear with the slowness and occasional 504s.

            • This reply was modified 1 month ago by  PKCano.
            • This reply was modified 1 month ago by  PKCano.
            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #146286 Reply

              mcbsys
              AskWoody Lounger

              Thanks, I appreciate the welcome and that you are working on site responsiveness. Just wanted to make sure you are aware of the errors in the password emails as well–probably needs a couple tweaks in the WordPress theme.

              1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #146105 Reply

        AlexEiffel
        AskWoody Lounger

        Thanks for the fix. I will try the network location awareness trick.

        Yes, patches restart the server at night, so they indirectly “cause” the issue, apparently. What is weird is I never changed anything to this server since it is in production. I never touch it and it started doing that for no reason after patches 3 months ago.

         

    • #146074 Reply

      MrJimPhelps
      AskWoody MVP

      You have to wonder when Microsoft stopped testing dot matrix printers

      Probably when they disbanded their testing dept.

      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #146094 Reply

      PKCano
      AskWoody MVP

      KB4048957/KB4048960 (Win7 Rollup and security-only) apparently reinstall Windows Media Player without preserving any of the settings. You see a first-time-run setup.

      10 users thanked author for this post.
      • #146135 Reply

        PKCano
        AskWoody MVP

        There is some Media Player info stored at:
        C:\Users\<ID>\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Medis Player\
        It might be worthwhile to copy this to a safe place before running updates.
        You could even test it by changing some of the Media Player settings/libraries/favorites/etc and see where they are stored prior to updating.

        There is a wmpconfig file in C:\Program Files and Program Files (x86) as well that changed with the new installation.as well

        4 users thanked author for this post.
      • #146989 Reply

        Charlie
        AskWoody Lounger

        So should I also move my entire MP3 and video collection to a safe place too?  This is the absolute pits!  I’d say more but I’d have to do it in the rant section.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #146992 Reply

          PKCano
          AskWoody MVP

          I would definitely back it up.
          Your music is probably in the “My Music” folder, and that probably won’t get messed with.
          But my guess is the playlists, settings, history, etc are somewhere in the AppData folder. I don’t use Media Player (I’m on a Mac), but I did look around for likely places.

          2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #146107 Reply

      Bill C.
      AskWoody Lounger

      Interesting.  Firefox no longer shows the log-in blocks.  Title bar says I am logged in.  We shall see.  I was alble to thank PKCano about the Media Player, so maybe I am actually logged in.

      FF 57 is FAST!!!

      • #146111 Reply

        PKCano
        AskWoody MVP

        It’s not FF. The site has lost several bits of functionality with the upsets. The login boxes are only part of it.

        3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #146120 Reply

      b
      AskWoody Lounger

      While you’re at it, consider whether the gain from patching on Patch Tuesday outweighs the schadenfreude of watching others go down in flames.

      Because dot matrix printers are so popular and ubiquitous?

      • #146157 Reply

        woody
        Da Boss

        Sure. And Microsoft suddenly refusing to recognize the “Current Branch for Business” setting, and clobbering one of its services. And, last month, bricking every PC attached to an update server that’s allowing patches through without review. And….

        3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #146185 Reply

        anonymous

        @ b

        The point about this is that since the launch of Win 10 Beta-OS and the lay-off of M$’s Quality Control or Testing Department in 2015, Windows Update has often borked computers running not-so-popular or obscure peripheral devices and program features(eg DDEAUTO). Do MacOS and Linux Update do this.?

        On top of that, with mandatory cumulative updates or Patch Rollups, uninstalling them to fix such problems will mean having to forego security updates that are also included in the cumulative patches, until M$ provide the necessary fix to the individual problematic update.
        … This window period until M$ come out with a fix may allow hackers to exploit such unpatched Windows computers, like the WannaCry and NotPetya ransomware exploit.

        Before the launch of Win 10, Windows Update seldom borked computers running not-so-popular or obscure peripheral devices and program features. Even if it often did, mitigation did not result in the affected users having to forego important security updates.

        So, M$-Windows may now stand for the window period for hackers to attack.

        5 users thanked author for this post.
        • #146202 Reply

          Noel Carboni
          AskWoody MVP

          I agree 100% about the way Windows Updates are delivered making less sense now.

          But I think the (rather pretentious) point is that when your obscure hardware device is broken by an update you’re supposed to go out and spend money to get another, different device (presumably from Microsoft, which is trying to become a hardware company). And when your obscure feature is trashed you’re supposed to go to the Microsoft Store and buy new software that will do what you need.

          -Noel

          7 users thanked author for this post.
        • #146321 Reply

          johnf
          AskWoody Lounger

          …since the launch of Win 10 Beta-OS and the lay-off of M$’s Quality Control or Testing Department in 2015, Windows Update has often borked computers running not-so-popular or obscure peripheral devices and program features(eg DDEAUTO). Do MacOS and Linux Update do this.?

          Don’t know about MacOS, but Linux tends to maintain kernel support for older devices (modems, SCSI, and dot matrix printers, among others). I run Linux Mint, and the upgrades offered are ranked on a 1-5 scale, where 1 is considered safe, and 5  is most risky. None of the upgrades are forced.

          There is some risk in upgrading kernels, but those are easy to roll back. Mint tends to run older kernels, to avoid dependency issues with newer software, but the most popular stuff (Browsers, for example) tend to get fixed and offered via backports. Other distributions may be more bleeding edge (Fedora is a good example), where you get the latest stuff right away, but it may break some things.

          Most distros have a link where you can report bugs both for betas and afterwards, as well.

           

          • This reply was modified 4 weeks, 1 day ago by  johnf.
          1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #146124 Reply

      anonymous

      What is a dot matrix printer?

      • #146128 Reply

        PKCano
        AskWoody MVP

        You must be younger than, maybe, 20.

        A picture is worth 1000 words

        Screen-Shot-2017-11-18-at-5.47.36-AM

        • This reply was modified 1 month ago by  PKCano.
        • This reply was modified 1 month ago by  PKCano.
        • This reply was modified 1 month ago by  PKCano.
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        4 users thanked author for this post.
        • #146146 Reply

          JohnW
          AskWoody Lounger

          Do you remember when printing ascii art on dot matrix printers was state of the art?  🙂

          2 users thanked author for this post.
          • #146147 Reply

            PKCano
            AskWoody MVP

            Whew! Now I know you are over 20! WAY OVER. 🙂

            3 users thanked author for this post.
            • #146208 Reply

              Noel Carboni
              AskWoody MVP

              Whew! Now I know you are over 20! WAY OVER. 🙂

              Geez, I’m a fossil I guess. I remember making ASCII art and even music with line printers.

              Remember line printers? Size of a stove, a moving chain of characters whizzing around, with a bank of little hammers poised to hit the right character against the ribbon and paper at just the right time… Print pages upon pages of fanfold in just seconds from a mainframe that took up a whole floor of a building…

              -Noel

              10 users thanked author for this post.
            • #146396 Reply

              John in Mtl
              AskWoody Lounger

              When I was about 25, I got my hands on a Qume daisy wheel printer.  Noisy as hell but I liked the sound when it was printing.  Built like a tank, that thing never quit on me, not even once, and I printed miles and miles of 16″ fanfold.  I can’t seem to recall what I did with it – sold it, left it somewhere, whatever.  Must be the “senior moment” thing!

              2 users thanked author for this post.
            • #146441 Reply

              Bill C.
              AskWoody Lounger

              Daisywheel!  WOW!  I have not heard that term since the new days of fax machines.

              I mean the ones with the rolls of silvery paper with a needle that scratched out the image or text.  Now that was 30+ years ago.

              Our workplace was pre-PC, using Wangs, and had some ‘brand new’ daisywheel printers.  They has a unique sound that really shifted when one of the petals broke off.

              We also had a couple of Wang stand-alones with removable Winchester drives for sensitive issues.  They were so slow a fast typist could finish a paragraph and then watch it appear on the monochrome green text monito screen.

              I changed jobs soon after and the new workplace had ‘modern’ 286 PCs with Wordperfect 5.1.  Most had 512Kb of memory, but mine had 640Kb… (yes Kb, NOT Mb.) 🙂

              Just a fast memory to refresh my perspective of how far and fast things have come.

              The big plus (at THAT time) of dot matrix printers with a tractor wheel, was the ability to print massive print jobs with all the pages in order.

              Sorry for the off topic, but I could not resist.

              3 users thanked author for this post.
        • #146397 Reply

          John in Mtl
          AskWoody Lounger

          We still had those about 2 years ago! They were replaced by  Xerox copiers that do everything except brew coffee.

      • #146170 Reply

        GoneToPlaid
        AskWoody Lounger

        A dot matrix printer is a mechanical device, consisting of either 9 or 24 solenoid driven wires, which punched onto an ink ribbon to transfer both ink and force onto paper or multi-part forms such as invoices, purchase receipts, et cetera. Dot matrix printers have been in use for over four decades, and are still in use today across the entire planet.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #146205 Reply

          Noel Carboni
          AskWoody MVP

          Which begs the question: Will anything built today last decades?

          Also another: Remember when consumables for printers didn’t cost an arm and a leg?

          -Noel

          7 users thanked author for this post.
          • #146259 Reply

            JohnW
            AskWoody Lounger

            Which is exactly why I switched to a cheap b&w laser printer, for the rare occasions when I actually need to print something out.  Tired of inkjet cartridges drying out between uses, wasting money.  Toner has had a much longer shelf life for me so far!  😉

            I print to .pdf files now as much as possible!

            7 users thanked author for this post.
          • #146627 Reply

            anonymous

            My Dad worked at Bell Laboratories for 37 years, before the break up.  Their standard for any technology was to assume that it had to work for 40 years, and to work under extremes of temperature, humidity, etc.

            When Hurricane Sandy hit, the only phones working in many places in New York City were the few “old technology” pay phones that still existed in a few places.  They had been built to that standard.

            3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #146148 Reply

      alpha128
      AskWoody Lounger

      As I already noted over here, my employer started rolling out the November patches on Wednesday 11/15 and they wreaked havoc.

      My own experience is that once I installed the November Security and Quality Roll-up for Windows 7 32-bit, it messed up my Windows Update and Microsoft Office 2010.

      Specifically, no further patches would install after the November Windows roll-up was installed. I ran the Windows Update troubleshooter and it said the “Service Registration was missing or corrupt” and also reported another error. After I followed these directions from Microsoft, Windows Update seemed to be working again.

      I scanned again for updates and recorded the KB numbers for what I had yet to install. There was one Microsoft Excel security update, one Microsoft Word security update, and MRT. I downloaded all three manually from Microsoft’s web site. I managed to get MRT installed, but the two Office updates still refused to install. I check the logs and they both said “fatal error”. I tried running a repair of Microsoft Office, and about two-thirds in, the repair started throwing up errors about being unable to write to the registry. I kept clicking the “Ignore” button just so it would finish.

      In other areas of the company there were reports of Outlook crashing repeatedly after installing the Windows roll-up. When I called the help desk to report I needed help getting these two Office patches installed, there was a recording saying something like, “If you are calling about the Outlook issue, we are aware of it and are looking into it.”

      Thankfully, in all other respects, my Office installation seems to be working normally. However, I have run a repair before, and never encountered those error messages until now.

      UPDATE 11/17/2017: I can now add to my previous post that I left my work machine on overnight and somehow the two Microsoft Office patches were successfully installed.

      I heard from a tech that the Outlook problem was that the program would crash whenever anyone opened an attachment. But I.T. apparently found a fix however, because they booted everyone out of Outlook near the end of the day for about an hour.

    • #146199 Reply

      Noel Carboni
      AskWoody MVP

      What’s the build of Win 10 v1709 supposed to be up to nowadays?

      I saw a number of things updated on my Win 10 test VM, so my manually initiated Windows Update worked after a fashion, but didn’t see the build number move off 16299.19. I’m just wondering if that’s what everyone’s seeing or if I have a broken Windows Update process again. Windows Update has gotten so iffy I can’t tell what’s supposed to happen when any more.

      I do see KB4048955 in the catalog, dated November 10, visible via web browser online so I guess my question boils down to whether it’s expected to be delivered via the normal online Windows Update process.

      Win10UpdateStatus

      -Noel

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      • #146224 Reply

        b
        AskWoody Lounger

        That’s OK. More opportunity to criticize things that have already been fixed.

        • #146399 Reply

          Noel Carboni
          AskWoody MVP

          Things that are already fixed, like the Windows Update process that used to work and be controllable?

          Now it can fail to install the latest update yet report it’s up to date (as you see in the screen grab above). Yeah, THAT’s progress. Shouldn’t we demand the technology on which we base our lives work at least as well as what we’ve already seen from it?

          I’m curious: What do you actually use your Windows system(s) for, b? I’d guess Facebook and Twitter, based on the lack of technical content in your posts. Anything beyond that? Gaming? The Weather App maybe?

          I use my systems for:

          • Software engineering (Visual Studio, Subversion, and a host of other 3rd party tools integrated by the Windows desktop).
          • Business Management, including design documentation, spreadsheets, and eMail (Microsoft Office).
          • Product support (Outlook, various tools).
          • Graphics work (Photoshop and a number of other graphics tools).
          • Interactive collaboration using voice over IP (Skype and others) and remote desktop sharing (Radmin).
          • Security systems development (CMD scripting, PowerShell, Visual Studio, 3rd party software, etc.).
          • General online research (Internet Explorer, Pale Moon, command line tools).
          • Serving geographically separate developers with Subversion features, to coordinate development.
          • Hobby activities too, such as running Software Defined Radio applications, accessing audio and video media online (Pandora, YouTube), helping people on forums, astroimage capture and processing…

          Unfortunately, rich as the above list of activities may seem I am having problems finding anything that Microsoft has done or is doing with Windows 10 that helps me advance my state of the art. And lest you wish to dismiss me as old and cranky, let’s note that I’ve fully embraced Windows 8.1. I’ve always been an early adopter, and I can assure you I didn’t somehow become a dinosaur stick-in-the-mud overnight.

          Show me the good in Windows 10 and I’ll put it on my hardware. I’ll even pay for it.

          Keep going down the path of cloud-integration and IQ 90 Apps and you’re going to lose your best customers.

          And no, forcing me to have mediocre Microsoft manage my systems (as a service) when I do it better – FAR better – isn’t a selling point. It’s an Epic Fail!

          -Noel

          .

          P.S., a system that runs reliably for as long as it takes between Windows Updates I initiate that require a reboot is a requirement, no matter HOW much work I throw at a system. Spontaneous reboots on purpose such as the experience Windows 10 delivers out of the box are simply unacceptable when one has important activities that cannot be interrupted scheduled 24/7. If I need to go months between updates that’s entirely up to me – not Microsoft!

          P.P.S., whatever happened to the initiative that Windows Updates shouldn’t require a reboot unless absolutely necessary? That was a goal back when intelligent people who were serious about computing worked at Microsoft.

          Uptime19Days

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          • #146414 Reply

            anonymous

            @ Noel Carboni,

            IIRC, “b” is a Windows IT Admin, similar to ch100.

      • #146229 Reply

        MrBrian
        AskWoody MVP

        From https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4048955: “This update will be downloaded and installed automatically from Windows Update.”

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #146243 Reply

          JohnW
          AskWoody Lounger

          It appears that according to that list, Noel’s machine is reporting the 1709 October build, rather than November.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #146313 Reply

          Noel Carboni
          AskWoody MVP

          So should it have updated itself to something newer than 16299.19?

          Asked another way, what build number are you folks with updated Win 10 systems seeing?

          -Noel

          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #146424 Reply

            JohnW
            AskWoody Lounger

            I don’t know what to say about 1709.  Since I run Windows 10 Pro on my main PC, I keep a safe distance (at least 6 months) behind the latest version.

            Currently on 1703 (OS Build 15063.726) for November.  So far my updates have always been in sync with the version reported in ‘winver’.  Not sure what could be going on with yours.  Maybe a bug in 1709?

            Hopefully someone else running 1709 can shed some light.

            1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #146630 Reply

            anonymous

            KB4048955 (OS Build 16299.64) is the latest (https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4043454).

            Cheers!

            • #146660 Reply

              Noel Carboni
              AskWoody MVP

              Thanks. I had seen that KB, as I mentioned, but it didn’t self-install. I still didn’t get a solid answer here about whether anyone has seen the automatic Windows Update process bring their system up to 16299.64. Mine didn’t; but running the KB4048955 .msu file did. So the Windows Update service, configured to be controlled manually, now just fails to bring a Windows system up to date with no error messages whatsoever… Yeah, THAT’s manageable.

              Update1
              Update2

              Then a manual installation from the catalog does the job just fine…

              AfterManualUpdate

              What’s funny is that even if you disable the Windows Update service it gets set back to Manual and started, presumably by some scheduled job I have yet to identify. So on the one hand Microsoft aggressively counteracts a user’s attempt to control updates, and on the other when it finally gets itself running Windows Update it’s completely toothless.

              I can’t be the only one to see the irony and humor in all this.

              -Noel

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    • #146233 Reply

      MrBrian
      AskWoody MVP

      Issue added to November 14, 2017—KB4048954 (OS Build 15063.726 and 15063.728): “Windows Pro devices on the Current Branch for Business (CBB) will upgrade unexpectedly.”

      • This reply was modified 1 month ago by  MrBrian.
      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #146328 Reply

      GoneToPlaid
      AskWoody Lounger

      It is a real riot to read, every single month, how badly Microsoft messes up this or that with new updates, or reintroduces bugs which had been fixed in previous updates. I have to wonder how bad things would be if the cell phone industry had actually jumped onto the Windows Phone bandwagon. Apparently they had the foresight not to.

      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #146331 Reply

      anonymous

      Does Cromebook support dot matrix printers?

    • #146346 Reply

      gborn
      AskWoody MVP

      Just like to mention that the article about CDPUserSvc mentioned by Woody in Computerworld is now in English available.

      Windows10 / Server 2016: Issues with CDPUserSvc

      My proposal is to try process isolation for the service. Maybe it helps to avoid the ‘stopp working’ issue.

      • This reply was modified 4 weeks, 1 day ago by  gborn.
      • This reply was modified 4 weeks, 1 day ago by  gborn.
      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #146411 Reply

        Noel Carboni
        AskWoody MVP

        Hi Gunter, do you know why Microsoft decided to add a hex string to the names of the services in the “Unistack Service Group”? Are they trying to circumvent people trying to control those services?

        With versions older than v1709 I had disabled ALL the services in the “Unistack Service Group”, which generally embody much of the cloud integration of Windows 10, and had settled Windows 10 down to be a nice Win32/desktop system. I haven’t found a way to achieve that yet with v1709 – but that doesn’t mean I’ve given up trying. 🙂

        That list of services, for reference, is:

        CDPSvc
        CDPUserSvc
        DevicesFlowUserSvc
        MessagingService
        OneSyncSvc
        PimIndexMaintenanceSvc
        UnistoreSvc
        UserDataSvc
        WpnService
        WpnUserService

        -Noel

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #146449 Reply

      HiFlyer
      AskWoody Lounger

      Chromebook doesn’t allow ANY direct printer connections. Web printing only…

      Google just made it a lot easier to print from Chrome OS

      June 11, 2017

      https://www.digitaltrends.com/computing/google-chrome-os-native-printing/

      ” It’s all thanks to the latest Chrome OS — version 59, which has now reached the Stable release channel, has a new “Native Printing” feature, which is to say that it can directly connect to all compatible printers within your network. Better still, it can do this without any cloud connection.

      Previously, if you wanted to print from Chrome OS, you had to hook a printer up to Google Cloud Print. But no longer is that the case. Now, you can print from Chrome OS to a locally networked printer, which ought to make things a lot more convenient for a lot of people. You’ll need to know your printer’s IP address in order to take advantage of this new functionality, but Google <ins>has provided instructions </ins>to guide you along the way.”

      HF

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      • #146455 Reply

        JohnW
        AskWoody Lounger

        Ha! Thanks!  Guess I’m just a little out of date. 🙂

        Been a couple of years since I bought a ChromeOS box for my Dad, and my knowledge is based on the research I did at that time.

        Printing is really the only drawback that I have seen for ChromeOS, and I am glad to hear that Google stepped up their game!

        Otherwise, with the free Microsoft Office Online available, web mail, various cloud storage services, and places to upload and store images, I see little reason for a casual user not to go 100% with cloud computing today.  Unless you must run local applications and software, you really don’t need a PC anymore.  🙂

      • #146453 Reply

        anonymous

        You can print from your Chromebook using most printers that connect to Wi-Fi or a wired network.

        Note: If your printer doesn’t connect to the internet, you can’t set it up with your Chromebook.

        .
        = still no offline printer capability with Chromebooks.

    • #146469 Reply

      anonymous

      Sayyy~I have a question. Okay-So my computers at work in the sorting room were installing updates including 1709, BUT also the KB update that causes espon and something printers to not work.

      Say that the receipt printer is a star something-BUT IS IT POSSIBLE THAT it also might not work as well if say you clicked always use this option to print if an image or display shows stuff and you press the print thingy, but after clicking use this option to print, the printer doesn’t work because I didn’t see it before.

       

      So would the simple solution to the issue be to remove the update to see if that’ll work?

      • #146472 Reply

        PKCano
        AskWoody MVP

        The problem affects EPSON dot matrix printers. If you have the problem with your dot matrix printer, you have a couple of choices.

        If you were already running Win10 v1709 (Fall Creators Update) already, and you received KB4048955 Cumulative Update, you can uninstall the CU.

        If you were running Win10 v1703 (Creators Update) or an earlier version, and you were Upgraded to V1709, your option at this time is to roll back to the earlier version.

        Please see Woody’s ComputerWorld article explaining this.

    • #146488 Reply

      anonymous

      I thought the site was still down since my bookmark went to your http not the https link. All I got for days was “400 bad request” I experimented and added the s and got here fine. Both of your Twitter links still lead to the error page.

    • #146516 Reply

      ky41083
      AskWoody Lounger

      Not entirely sure where else to post this, it’s definitely monthly update related, so, here it goes…

      I have noticed, that my non-domain (workgroup mode) group policy settings (i.e. gpedit.msc) seem to be randomly reset upon monthly update installs. Basically, different registry settings get reset by different patches, regardless of if they have been set by group policy, or not.

      System restore is just one example I have seen changed on multiple occasions. I have system restore disabled via gpedit.msc, and have seen it turned on, while still being disabled via gpedit.msc, at least 3 separate times to date, on multiple Windows 10 systems. Screenshot:

      SystemRestoreDisabledOn

      I have been running a gpupdate /force (without the /force switch, it does not always heal all settings), followed by (another) reboot, as a final step, after every monthly “patch to current” WU operation. I do this after the final reboot that finishes installing all available updates. This has restored all of my custom workgroup mode group policy settings to date, and I’ve been testing this workaround for at least 3 separate WU runs now.

      No clue if this applies to domain joined Windows 10 or not. I would assume not, as the domain controllers should be enforcing group policy settings, and reapplying them on clients as needed.

      Another somewhat related issue…

      I’ve also noticed, that manually running Start maintenance, from the Security and Maintenance control panel, will re-enable the Windows Update service, if you have disabled it for any number of reasons. I have not seen this behavior, with the automated idle time maintenance runs Windows 10 does in the background, no matter how long I let them run (24+ hours). These two operations are supposed to be exactly the same, but, this happens only from a forced maintenance run.

      This WU service enable behavior is new to me, as I’ve been manually forcing maintenance runs, after WU updates install, and I disable the WU service, for a long time now (over a year), on multiple Windows 10 installs. In the past, maintenance runs had never re-enabled a disabled Windows Update service. Now they do, so, something has changed.

      These are things I’d like to see noted on a blog dedicated to issues and quirks specifically with Windows Updates, so I posted them here, in the latest monthly rundown thread, as they do technically apply to it as well 😉

      That, and, I’ve not seen any info from anyone suggesting that settings set via group policy, local or domain, are being reset by updates. In fact I’ve read nothing but the opposite at this point, so, I feel these issues are important to recognize, so we can better understand what sh*t updates break in the future, why, and a solid course of correction (like a gpupdate /force script run post update installs).

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      • #146524 Reply

        anonymous

        I’m noticing something strange too. My Windows Update is acting strange as well. I always disable it, but now after accidentally installing updates last week-It would switch to manual (trigger start). I just noticed it today.

         

        Do you suppose it could relate to KB4049011 or maybe KB4048954? If I uninstall those updates do you suppose that’ll fix the problem or cause something else?

        • #146532 Reply

          PKCano
          AskWoody MVP

          KB4048954 is the Cumulative update for Win10 v1703.
          KB4049011 is the servicing stack for WIn10 v1703.

          You can try uninstalling them one at a time and and check to see if it corrects the problem. I would reinstall any that do not correct the problem.

          • #146537 Reply

            anonymous

            Well since there has been issues with the updates lately and since were on level 2, if I uninstall both updates-I can always reinstall them once were at level 3 and when there is correction to the updates perhaps?

             

            I mean no harm will happen if I remove both updates right?

        • #146548 Reply

          ky41083
          AskWoody Lounger

          That could possibly “undo” the issue, but my guess is that this was an intentional change by MS, and as such, installing any future updates will restore this behavior.

          Technically speaking, the Windows Update service should never be disabled, so MS would have no reason to leave it disabled if it included a check for that in a background maintenance task.

          Edit to remove HTML

          • This reply was modified 4 weeks ago by  PKCano.
          • This reply was modified 4 weeks ago by  ky41083.
          • This reply was modified 4 weeks ago by  PKCano.
      • #146536 Reply

        JohnW
        AskWoody Lounger

        Don’t know what to say, but I haven’t observed any of these issues on my system following updates.  Running Windows 10 Pro x64 version 1703, with latest patches, and local account only.

        Also using GPEDIT to set several policies, including disabling automatic updates (Configure Automatic Updates = Disabled).  The policy settings stay put just fine from update to update.  However I do not find it necessary to disable the update service.  The policy seems to do the job just fine.

        • This reply was modified 4 weeks ago by  JohnW.
        • #146554 Reply

          ky41083
          AskWoody Lounger

          The policy settings do not change. The registry entries they control are what is being changed.

          • #146565 Reply

            JohnW
            AskWoody Lounger

            Maybe I should have stated more clearly that nothing changed in the areas you have described on my PC.  My Windows behavior regarding GP, registry, and services, remains consistent from update to update, with the exception of major feature changes.

            In the case of major feature changes, for example some options in the Windows Settings UI are sometimes changed, according to Microsoft’s latest plans.  But those are usually announced and written about in the tech press coverage, so no surprises there.

            So what you are describing sounds unusual, and if it was common I would expect a lot more folks would be going bananas.  Sounds like something is wrong somewhere.

            I will mention that my Windows 10 install was a clean wipe and fresh install originally.  It has been generally been problem free for almost 18 months.

            • #146577 Reply

              ky41083
              AskWoody Lounger

              Understood.

              I am seeing this issue on 2 completely separate Windows 10 installs. Both fresh installs. Both stock, aside from the WU service being disabled, and some GP settings (which are still considered stock).

              One other user has chimed in and said they can confirm the issue at this point. WU service re-sets itself to the default Manual (Trigger Start) after being set to Disabled.

              You also stated that you do not disable the WU service, so I’m not sure why you would see that issue?

              • This reply was modified 4 weeks ago by  ky41083.
              • This reply was modified 4 weeks ago by  ky41083.
            • #146582 Reply

              JohnW
              AskWoody Lounger

              No need to disable WU service.  GP prevents all updates, until you manually click on ‘Check for updates’.  Works great!  No worries!

      • #146561 Reply

        abbodi86
        AskWoody MVP

        Hace you disabled schedule tasks related to WU in categories: UpdateOrchestrator & WindowsUpdate?
        they can reset WU settings

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        • #146570 Reply

          ky41083
          AskWoody Lounger

          No, I have not disabled any stock tasks in Task Scheduler. That is much further than I am willing to go, to simply keep the WU service disabled. If MS wants it on that bad, on it will probably stay for me. There is enough control via GP as far as installs go, having it off was just stopping it from being irritating by checking for updates at random times.

      • #151643 Reply

        ky41083
        AskWoody Lounger

        I just got re-re-bit by this behavior. On my laptop I finally stopped disabling the Windows Update service, for sanity sake. It was hibernated for about a month or so, since I last used it.

        Upon resuming, Windows Update proceeded to check for, download, & install updates. Even though my Group Policy settings are absolutely, and have always been, set to “notify for download”. This setting was working and in effect when I hibernated the laptop. It was one of the things I was checking, per my post above.

        To fix it, I again, had to run a gpupdate /force, and reboot before the updates finished downloading and started installing. Without changing a single GP setting, this worked, and when the laptop booted, Windows Update once again had the correct settings applied, and stopped downloading updates I did not ask for.

        Now I know I’m not crazy, and the registry settings that GP settings control, can, and are, on occasion, being changed / reset…

        I still have no idea what causes this.

        • This reply was modified 5 days, 15 hours ago by  ky41083. Reason: typo
    • #146559 Reply

      anonymous

      Is there a SuperUser (SU) policy (over and above admin rights) is being used by MS to circumvent admin changes in W10? Nothing would surprise me at all..

    • #146595 Reply

      amraybt
      AskWoody Lounger

      I’ve seen this thread on bleepingcomputer that some Win 7 x32 systems are hanging on reboot after installing the November rollup, requiring users to use Startup Repair or otherwise restore the system to an earlier point to undo the damage.

      Apparently uninstalling AVG before installing the rollup avoids the issue on following attempts for affected systems. Some people are mentioning a conflict with another software called “Trusteer Rapport” which I haven’t heard of before.

      Some of the comments are a little confusing/strange, so I’m not sure how reliable the information in there actually is.

      • This reply was modified 4 weeks ago by  amraybt.
      • #146725 Reply

        David F
        AskWoody Lounger

        Trusteer is used as an anti fraud solution by some Banks. It’s had a “mixed” reception as in the early days it ate cpu cycles like anything. I gather it has been improved but would not use it myself (my last bank used to offer it as a freebie but it seemed a bit more trouble than it was worth)

    • #146612 Reply

      Pepsiboy
      AskWoody Lounger

      Well, I got this list of 12 updates available from Windows Update this morning.
      KB3031432
      KB890830
      KB3004375
      KB3184143
      KB2871997
      KB3046269
      KB2676562
      KB3033929
      KB4049016
      KB4048960
      KB4047206

      Also, my program list through ‘control Panel’ shows that NO UPDATES have ever been installed. Windows Update does not function. I checked ‘System Restore’ and the only restore point available was the last one done Manually.

      I would like to attach screen shots of this, but I don’t know how here.

      I’m running Win 7 Home Premium x64 on a HP G62 laptop.

      I’m thinking about restoring to that restore point and see what happens.
      Any thoughts or comments are appreciated. Thanks to all, in advance.

      Dave

    • #146635 Reply

      Pepsiboy
      AskWoody Lounger

      I find this strange. KB4048960 is the Nov security only update and KB4047206 is the IE Cumulative update. Neither of these patches are offered through Windows Update. They are manual download/manual install. I would certainly like to see the screenshot of the Windows Update list. You might try the snipping too.

      PKCano,

      I would like to show screen shots, but have had trouble with attachments. The updates shown were given through WUMT, not Windows Update. Sorry. I think I have fixed the problem myself. I ran System restore to the only restore point shown, 11-15-17.  So far, everything looks good. Only thing that had changed was Adobe Acrobat Reader update and Flash update. They reverted back and got REUPDATED with no more trouble.

      Thanks for the tip.

      Dave

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #146654 Reply

        abbodi86
        AskWoody MVP

        You seem to have used offline mode with wsusscn2.cab

    • #146643 Reply

      Sessh
      AskWoody Lounger

      It was only a matter of time before MS started sneaking things into updates in order to make it harder for people to be prudent and decide the exact time they want to update their machines. This proves once again that MS demands people update on their schedule as opposed to yours and also proves they are willing to slip things into updates to take control away from users in an attempt to stop them from doing this because as we all know, allowing users to easily have full control over the machines they paid for is a very, very BAD thing!

      Group W not viable, huh? Turns out I was right in thinking they would eventually start sneaking stuff into updates and there’s no reason for me personally to doubt that they would be willing to get more aggressive with this in the future if necessary. There’s just no trust left for me.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #146647 Reply

        JohnW
        AskWoody Lounger

        If you have Windows 10 Pro, there is no need to disable the WU service.  GP is all you need to use to prevent automatic updates.  The perceived problem was one of the user’s own making.

        We all suspect that Windows 10 is one giant crapshoot. But in this specific case, if Microsoft is ‘sneaking’ in a re-activation of a disabled process, it is really not a big deal.  I sympathize with the poster for being alarmed at this behavior, but in reality this instance has little real-world impact.

        However, we should continue to remain vigilant for any changes that really do matter!

        Resistance is futile…  welcome to the Borg!  🙂

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        • #146757 Reply

          Sessh
          AskWoody Lounger

          Well, I wouldn’t touch Windows 10, but why should a Windows update be sneaking anything into updates that aim to change user settings and not change them back? Considering MS has already done the far more serious GWX thing, it’s clear they are not above sneaking things in like that to get their way.

          The issue isn’t negated, IMO, just because the settings can be re-applied or altered in GP settings. The issue is MS shouldn’t be undoing things that the user has done in accordance to their preferences and certainly shouldn’t be doing so VIA Windows Update. At that point, you’re just fighting the OS which is time that could have been spent using your PC for the things you actually bought it for instead.

          I know this is Windows 10, but I tend to view it more in terms of Microsoft in general and what they are willing to do to force change on users. I understand this is a rather minor thing compared to some of the other things they’ve done, but it’s just one more notch in the totem pole of reasons to be skeptical of trusting them.

          If it was only little things like this, it would be different. Unfortunately, it is not. Whether a poke berry bush produces small or large berries doesn’t change the fact that the berries are poisonous. Microsoft has also become poisonous coming in small and large doses and can infect any OS MS still actively has their hands on. Even the little things add up.

          Microsoft will eventually fall just like the Borg did. 🙂 Except 7 of 9; she can stay.

          2 users thanked author for this post.
          • #146783 Reply

            JohnW
            AskWoody Lounger

            Well what Microsoft should be doing vs. what they are doing, has been a hotly debated topic in recent times!  So I will leave that to others for now…

            What I will say here is that I have been using Windows 10 Pro for almost 18 months, and through three major versions.  And all this time, I have not experienced a single Group Policy setting being reset on my PC during updates.  I have set GP to turn off:  automatic updates, Cortana, use location, application telemetry, steps recorder, and Windows Defender.  And they have stayed that way.

            I would not be surprised if drivers, services, registry settings, etc. are being mucked with every now and then during updates, but I must say that I have very high confidence now in using the Win 10 Group Policy settings to retain as much control as possible.  However one glance at my firewall logs shows Windows is still a bit chatty.  Sigh… just have to trust Microsoft and their privacy policy, or move on, I suppose…

            And 7 of 9 is always welcome in my collective!  That was actually one of my PC names for a while. 🙂

            3 users thanked author for this post.
            • #146837 Reply

              Noel Carboni
              AskWoody MVP

              Microsoft has NO BUSINESS changing the settings we make. Nor do they have any business trying to protect those settings from users. But they ARE doing these things, slowly, methodically.

              Calling Windows “as a Service” doesn’t make it right.

              Getting people to agree to whatever then abusing their trust doesn’t make it right, though it probably makes it legal for them to do whatever they want. The legal thing to do and the right thing to do can be two different things.

              Most people probably don’t remember that Windows Update has always had the ability to override people’s settings. I think it was in the era of XP or Vista that it happened before. The Group Policy settings are only settings; they don’t actually prevent anything. In my case I keep my systems in a condition where a firewall (among several other things) prevent unwanted/unexpected updates.

              And yeah, Microsoft is DEFINITELY now in the habit of re-enabling specifically disabled services. It’s one of several reasons Win 10 doesn’t run my serious computer hardware and remains only a curiosity in a virtual machine still. I simply can no longer trust Microsoft.

              Just a precious few short years ago any software that got its foot in your door then wouldn’t relinquish control was called MALWARE. Now Microsoft is trying to change the culture to get people used to this kind of abuse.

              -Noel

              4 users thanked author for this post.
            • #146845 Reply

              JohnW
              AskWoody Lounger

              Yup, well sorry Noel, but from that perspective your options in the current Microsoft environment come down to either encapsulating your “safe” environments (e.g. VMs), or moving to an alternate OS.

              Thinking that we can change Microsoft, is well… doh!!!

            • #151721 Reply

              JohnW
              AskWoody Lounger

              I just re-read this thread and it has occurred to me that some possible confusion may be due to the way Microsoft has blurred the line for the end user regarding the difference between updates and upgrades.  And I believe that the difference is important to know.

              If monthly quality and security updates are changing any user settings, that would be a concern, even if it only occurred under special circumstances.  This has not happened to me yet.

              But the big difference now is how major Windows 10 OS upgrades are delivered automatically.  The changes between versions 1511, 1607, 1703, 1709, etc. are OS upgrades.

              Some settings are going to have to change whenever you run an OS upgrade.  I assume it’s quite similar to the upgrade you get from Windows 7 to Windows 8, or Win 10, except that it’s still called Windows 10.  You will need to re-check all of your default settings, because there is never a guarantee that all will be carried over to the next version.

              I assume it would be impossible to remove old features, add new features, and fundamentally change how the OS functions under the hood without changing a few registry options here or there…

            • #151821 Reply

              ky41083
              AskWoody Lounger

              I completely agree with absolutely everything you in your post JohnW.

              The biggest hangup, for me, at this point, is that between the two Windows 10 “daily driver” installs where I am the only admin user, I am seeing registry settings set by Group Policy modified after the fact, completely outside of Feature Updates.

              One install is an upgrade from fresh 1511, to 1607, where all Windows Update related GP settings were re-evaluated + reset + reapplied more or less immediately after the 1607 update. This install is still on 1607, so no “feature updates” applied since then.

              The other install is a fresh 1607 install, where GP settings were evaluated and set fairly soon after initial install, and this system is still running 1607 today, so, it’s never had a feature update installed.

              I have seen GP settings modified on both of these installs, with no explanation so far, and where no more than a “gpupdate /force + reboot” restores desired behavior.

              I would expect to have to do things like this after installing any feature update, as you said, and I agree, these are simply upgrades that still call themselves Windows 10.

    • #146937 Reply

      MrBrian
      AskWoody MVP

      Issue added to the Knowledge Base articles of the last 3 builds of Windows 10 v1607 and Windows Server 2016: ‘After installing KB4041688, KB4052231, or KB4048953, the error “CDPUserSvc_XXXX has stopped working” appears. Additionally, Event ID 1000 is logged in the Application event log. It notes that svchost.exe_CDPUserSvc_XXXX has stopped working and the faulting module name is “cdp.dll”.’

      More info: http://borncity.com/win/2017/11/19/windows10-server-2016-issues-with-cdpusersvc/.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #146994 Reply

      Purg2
      AskWoody Lounger

      So should I also move my entire MP3 and video collection to a safe place too? This is the absolute pits! I’d say more but I’d have to do it in the rant section.

      I wouldn’t think that WMP would effect file storage.  However, I keep copies of “all” my media on an external hard drive.

      Win 8.1 Group B

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #146999 Reply

      Charlie
      AskWoody Lounger

      FF 57 is FAST!!!

      It’s also very ugly.

       

    • #147391 Reply

      anonymous

      I run Windows 7 Professional 64-bit.  I have not yet applied any Windows Updates.

      In my research on potential issues, I found the following:

      The poster appears to have applied the “Windows 7 monthly roll-up KB4048957 and what happened was the system was on the enter user and then password. After that was done the screen went to black with the mouse cursor and the had drive light just sitting there flashing. I could get into Task Manager but the desktop or start button or anything would never appear. So I tried restarting and finally had to power down the system and go into Safe mode and roll back to yesterday before the update to get the computer to work and start at all. ”

      Later in the thread, it appears that they were able to eventually get the update successfully installed, but others on the thread reported the same problem. The problem was posted at the following link.  Just a heads up for folks.

      https://partnersupport.microsoft.com/en-us/par_clientsol/forum/par_win/november-2017-windows-update-caused-problems-on/706d00ab-9138-4825-8a53-1057dd39fdba?auth=1

    • #146545 Reply

      anonymous

      I see. So your saying that MS intentionally put something in this month’s updates knowing that people were disabling windows update to wait for the safety level to install new updates.

      So they did it on purpose then. And any future updates will fix the behavior. But your saying right now be careful when you open the panel and don’t check the security panel and/or security/maintenance or anything security. As long as you got your updates in and also hid 1709 then you should be okay.

      Just be careful next time when changing modes and also be sure to install updates when on level 3.

      Anyway I got it disabled and the service stopped so I should be alright, but I’m gonna keep an eye on my computer to be safe. Also I keep it disabled because I hate when WU auto-scans for updates and slows abit my computer.

    • #146555 Reply

      ky41083
      AskWoody Lounger

      I’m saying MS intentionally put something in updates released months ago (not sure exactly when), and I am finally understanding the pattern a bit. Since they are cumulative, installing any new updates will bring in this change.

      There is nothing to fix, this behavior is clearly intentional. To avoid it, you would have to stop installing updates entirely.

      I too disable the WU service to stop it from checking for updates in the background, on top of controlling it through group policy for when I do enable it.

    • #146587 Reply

      anonymous

      Ehhh I’m not one for group policy and changing stuff around. I’m more of your basic external and internal fixer up from dusting and cleaning computer to average stuff like scanning, defragmenting, ccleaner and stuff.

      🙂 Anyway I’ll just be careful when going to security/maintenance, maybe for safety switch to manual and check those areas and then switch back to disabled and stop service.

      I’ll do it tonight and once I check in the morning that it stays disabled, it’ll rest my mind. I’m trying to relax a little this week because it’s thanksgiving week and last week was quite hectic for me even when stopping 1709 from installing when I accidentally left on the manual or something.

       

       

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    Reply To: Roundup of bugs in the November Patch Tuesday crop

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