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  • Win7 Servicing Stack updates: Managing change and appreciating cumulative updates

    Posted on September 21st, 2018 at 16:38 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    You may recall the problem we had earlier this month with Error 0x8000FFFF in the Win7 Cumulative Update?

    John Wilcox has just posted an item in the Windows IT Pro Blog with some (eminently readable!) details:

    Some Windows 7 devices recently experienced issues installing either the August or September 2018 Monthly Rollups or Security-only updates. The intent of this blog is to share why these issues occurred, what we are doing about it, and how this relates to Windows 10 cumulative updates.
    To tell this story, we need to travel back to October of 2016, when we released the Windows 7 Service Pack 1 (SP1) servicing stack update (KB 3177467). Servicing stack updates, or SSUs, are periodic updates released to specifically service or update the software stack for Windows platforms. These are fixes to the code that process and manage updates that need separate servicing periodically to improve the reliability of the update process, or address issue(s) that prevent patching some other part of the OS with the monthly latest cumulative update (LCU).

    It’s an interesting tale, well worth reading.

  • Has Microsoft moved the cumulative update cheese?

    Posted on September 21st, 2018 at 10:20 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    UPDATE: There’s another possibility. Is it possible that Microsoft has pulled KB 4458469 (and possibly the other cumulative updates released yesterday) from Windows Update? It’s still available from the Catalog, but apparently has never been in WSUS. Big problems with the patch? Is MS waiting for a Friday Night News Dump opportunity?

    I’m trying to figure out whether yesterdays Win10 patches are installed automatically by Windows Update. Could use some crowdsourced intelligence. (Or any intelligence, for that matter.)

    Many people are complaining that they don’t see the 1803 patch even if they manually invoke Windows Update. It’s possible (as @PKCano notes) that the difference lies in whether Win10 Pro users have Semi-Annual Channel or Semi-Annual Channel (Targeted) selected. Home users don’t have the option of course.

    It’s also possible that KB 4458469 is being rolled out verrrrrrrry slowly.

    There’s another possibility.

    The terminology in the KB article has changed. The Sept. 17 patch says:

    How to get this update


    This update will be downloaded and installed automatically from Windows Update. To get the stand-alone package for this update, go to the Microsoft Update Catalog website.

    Which is what you would expect. On the other hand, the Sept. 20 patch says:

    Install this update

    To download and install this update, go to Settings > Update & Security > Windows Update and select Check for updates.

    To get the standalone package for this update, go to the Microsoft Update Catalog website.

    That seems to imply that only “seekers” — people who click on Check for updates — will get the patch. But, demonstrably, not all Win10 1803 “seekers” — users who check for updates — actually get it. There’s no reference to SAC/SAC(T).

    Can anyone shed some light on the availability of any of yesterday’s patches, based on:

    • Whether you’re using Pro or Home. (Both Home and Pro users have confirmed that they’re getting the 1803 update — but both Home and Pro users have said they aren’t getting KB 4458469 .)
    • If Pro, whether you’re set for SAC or SAC(T)
    • Whether you’re a seeker — you manually click on Check for Updates, or just let the Windows Update steamroller jugger your naut.
    • Any other chicken entrails you can discern.

    FWIW, my 1803 machine is Pro, SAC(T) — I have it intentionally at the default update settings — and even when I seek I don’t see the update.

    Observations greatly appreciated.