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  • Patch Lady – 31 days of paranoia – day 12

    Posted on October 12th, 2018 at 23:10 Susan Bradley Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    We are at day 12 of our month long trip through paranoia.  Today our topic is about routers and specifically router hardening.  No matter if your router is provided by your Internet Service Provider or you purchased it, there are a few steps to take to ensure that you are as secure as you could be.  Many of these steps are covered in this FBI video.

    First if the router is provided by your ISP, often they enable guest access.  I make a rule to find the section of the router that Comcast enables their allowed access and disable it.  Next I reset all default passwords of the router and ensure that the router can not be accessed externally.

    Then I ask myself… how long have I had this router?  If you can’t remember when your ISP provided it to you, or when you purchased it, it’s time to contact your ISP and inquire about a hardware upgrade.  Often you need a hardware upgrade, but they forgot to tell you that you need a replacement.

    Review your wifi security settings and ensure that they are as secure as they could be.  Ensure they are set to be at least WPA2.

    Routers can be used by attackers in all sorts of ways.  As noted in the video:

    Bad actors could watch your Internet traffic and see or steal your sensitive data.

    Bad actors could send a simple command to your router and permanently disable it.

    Bad actors could use your router to launch a network attack on another device.

    Time to review how your router is setup and how secure it is.

    How well is yours set up?

     

  • Microsoft confirms bug triggering bluescreens in Win10 HP computers

    Posted on October 12th, 2018 at 07:32 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Toldja so….

    The problem with WDF_VIOLATION bluescreens in HP computers after installing the latest Win10 1803 or 1809 cumulative updates isn’t, exactly, the fault of the updates.

    The problem lies in the interaction of those updates with an HP keyboard driver that Microsoft pushed as part of the update process.

    We have official confirmation now. KB 4468372 was just issued, and it says:

    Microsoft has identified an HP driver with known incompatibility with certain HP devices on Windows 10 versions 1803 and 1809.  On October 11, Microsoft removed the driver from Windows Update to reduce the number of devices affected. Additionally, we have released KB 4468304 to remove the incompatible driver from devices pending reboot. HP is actively working on this issue.

    I just don’t understand why Microsoft insists on pushing drivers — and why they don’t test their pushed cumulative updates with their pushed drivers.

    Sigh.