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  • Microsoft yanks buggy cumulative update for SQL Server 2016 SP2, KB 4293807

    Posted on August 20th, 2018 at 14:22 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    The SQL Server engineering team just posted this on the MSDN SQL Server blog:

    On Tuesday August 14, we published a Security Update for six different releases of SQL Server 2016 and 2017. For one of those releases, SQL Server 16 SP2 CU (KB4293807), we inadvertently published additional undocumented trace flags that are normally not on by default. We are working on replacing the update in the next few days. If you installed KB4293807 and are experiencing issues please uninstall the update until the replacement update (KB4458621) is available.

    Günter Born reports one of his correspondents couldn’t get the cumulative update to install, failing with an error 0x80070643. Trying again this morning, the patch wasn’t available.

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    Home Forums Microsoft yanks buggy cumulative update for SQL Server 2016 SP2, KB 4293807

    This topic contains 10 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by  gborn 1 month ago.

    • Author
      Posts
    • #211852 Reply

      woody
      Da Boss

      Them SQL Server engineering team just posted this on the MSDN SQL Server blog: On Tuesday August 14, we published a Security Update for six different
      [See the full post at: Microsoft yanks buggy cumulative update for SQL Server 2016 SP2, KB 4293807]

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #211859 Reply

      mcbsys
      AskWoody Lounger
    • #211871 Reply

      Mr. Natural
      AskWoody Lounger

      In other words, SQL patches used to be exempt from all the bugs and instability from Microsoft updates. Since July these updates can also no longer be trusted along with all the other updates including .Net as well. Congrats Microsoft, you’re really making a mess of everything now. Things are getting worse, not better.

      I’m angry and I’ve had my fill. I may be stuck wrestling with this at work but personally I will never buy any Microsoft product again. This includes any hardware or software made by Microsoft. Especially after the way they responded and treated Susan.

      It’s obvious now. A total disregard for the consumer and full steam ahead with their ridiculous agenda. It takes a lot to get me angry. Microsoft has finally pushed enough buttons to accomplish that.  Did I mention I was angry? Someone should ask me what I really think….. meh maybe not.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #211909 Reply

        anonymous

        I’m with you. Where I work (~70 users across the US), previously we had a full MS backend like SQL, Exchange, Dynamics GP, WSUS, AD, etc., but we finished the full transition to cloudy SaaS stuff. On the endpoint side, we are now fully transitioned from Windows to Mac, except for a handful of Winblows systems for apps not available on macOS (e.g. our bank RDC system). It’s been a good switch overall.

        Similarly, I also use a Mac at home as my daily driver, although I still have a couple of Windows PCs around for specific purposes. I bought a couple of Windows 8.1 Pro licenses early this year when I saw that Windows 7 was swirling the drain, thanks to MS’s ardent patching missteps. But that’s all I’m buying ever again. I’ve had it with Microsoft. I’ve had it with Windows 10 (I also provide freelance tech support within reasonable driving distance).

        I wrestled with two Windows 10 systems over the weekend. This retired couple each had their own HP desktop running Windows 10 Home, and each system had upgraded to 1803. The husband’s PC…well, the upgrade had somehow broken his login credentials. He fought with it for 3 days before giving up and calling me. I also spent time cleaning up the system from all the cr–, I mean junk that MS has to put on there. The wife’s PC, somehow the 1803 upgrade had messed up the built-in Mail client, and she was running into messages that would auto-delete, change the date/time of the messages (there were messages in there from the year 2021), and a bunch of other issues. They kept asking me “why this” and “why that” and complaining about all the hoops they had to jump through, complaining that Edge was in their face constantly wanting them to switch from Chrome, and complaining about all these stupid advertisements for games and tips they didn’t want.

        I spent 4 hours at their house fixing the 1803 carnival show, fixing system settings that were modified during the upgrade, and uninstalling the ridiculous stuff that MS insists everyone have on their computer. I really dislike Microsoft’s constant micromanaging of Windows 10.

        Did I say I was done with Microsoft? Yeah, cause I am.

      • #211913 Reply

        Chronocidal Guy
        AskWoody Lounger

        I think the only thing that will get Microsoft’s to take action at this point is if this discussion overflows the “proper” channels, and begins leaking into mainstream media.  Maybe we’ll get lucky, and Windows will force an update on the Superbowl jumbotrons this coming year.  I would pay good money to see that.

        I know a lot of people don’t have issues with Windows 10, but with so many varying levels of expertise and expectation, there is no way to get a representative sample that can bring any kind of conclusive judgement to how bad this is getting.

        There is a very wide sample of commentary on how Windows is pushing updates now, and they range from gentle nudges, as in Susan Bradley’s letter, to vitriolic diatribes that could strip all the hair on your body, and leave you missing a few layers of skin.  I’ve seen a few posts on the MS Answers site that consisted almost entirely of asterisks from aut0-censoring, but they disappear very quickly.  Things like that tend to be either down-voted into obscurity, or buried beneath the more popular questions, if not being outright deleted for their content.

        Still, even amongst the more civil discussions… the fact remains that most queries about broken Windows updates that I have read end in one of two ways:
        1.  The user crying uncle, and being forced to install Windows again from scratch (possibly losing all of their data)
        2.  The volunteers stating that they don’t actually work for Microsoft, and urging the user to take their complaints to an official channel (as if that might elicit some kind of useful response)

        Bottom line, it’s feeling like all of these problems aren’t becoming public enough for Microsoft to care yet.  Keyword, yet.  I don’t know what kind of public mess it will actually take before they bow to the demands of their customers.

        • #211944 Reply

          lurks about
          AskWoody Lounger

          The adage where there is smoke there is a fire is applicable. There are enough creditable reports of severe problems every month for there not to be a major problem inside MS. But as you observed, the damage is limited right now as it is only widely reported in the tech press and not the mainstream press.

      • #212012 Reply

        JCCWsusser
        AskWoody Lounger

        In other words, SQL patches used to be exempt from all the bugs and instability from Microsoft updates. Since July these updates can also no longer be trusted along with all the other updates including .Net as well. Congrats Microsoft, you’re really making a mess of everything now. Things are getting worse, not better.

        They’ve obviously moved all of their resources from patching to working on 1809.

        I never approved this one. Thank you, MS-DEFCON.

    • #211902 Reply

      techweenie
      AskWoody Lounger

      In other words, SQL patches used to be exempt from all the bugs and instability from Microsoft updates. Since July these updates can also no longer be trusted along with all the other updates including .Net as well. Congrats Microsoft, you’re really making a mess of everything now. Things are getting worse, not better. I’m angry and I’ve had my fill. I may be stuck wrestling with this at work but personally I will never buy any Microsoft product again. This includes any hardware or software made by Microsoft. Especially after the way they responded and treated Susan. It’s obvious now. A total disregard for the consumer and full steam ahead with their ridiculous agenda. It takes a lot to get me angry. Microsoft has finally pushed enough buttons to accomplish that. Did I mention I was angry? Someone should ask me what I really think….. meh maybe not.

      I’m in the same boat you are.  I’ve been pushing Synology very hard on all my clients.  For the few instances Microsoft is required, it can run in a VM on Synology.  Very soon I think UCS (Univention) can fully replace Microsoft.

    • #211931 Reply

      anonymous

      Ruined MSSQL QA as well? This company is really hitting new lows every day; almost sounds like corporate suicide.

    • #212005 Reply

      anonymous
    • #212019 Reply

      gborn
      AskWoody MVP

      SQL Server 2016 SP2: Update-Revision KB4458621

      • This reply was modified 1 month ago by  gborn.
      • This reply was modified 1 month ago by  gborn.

    Please follow the -Lounge Rules- no personal attacks, no swearing, and politics/religion are relegated to the Rants forum.

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