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  • Patch Lady – 1803 declared Semi-annual

    Posted on June 14th, 2018 at 13:11 Susan Bradley Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Microsoft today declared 1803 as “ready for business” and is flipping from the Semi-annual targeted (the old CB) to Semi-annual (the old CBB). (*)

    What this means:

    If you have your Windows 10 pro settings to defer feature updates for Semi-annual channel and have a deferral setting of “0”, you will soon get 1803.  I have mine set at 364 days of deferral so that I can choose exactly when I deploy 1803.

    Susan’s take:  I think it’s still a bit early to roll out 1803 to businesses.  I’m still seeing nagging issues.  Check with your vendors if they are ready for 1803, and if they aren’t ask they why they haven’t been testing for 1803 already?

    As long at 1803 is getting updates twice a month (it’s had two already in the month of June one of which was fixing a big bug for my industry the multi-user QuickBooks problem) I’m not comfortable with rolling out 1803 widely at this time.

    https://blogs.windows.com/windowsexperience/2018/06/14/ai-powers-windows-10-april-2018-update-rollout/

    Things still unfixed:

    1.  SMBv1 issues – patch later in June per known issues in 1803 – https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4284835

    Some users running Windows 10 version 1803 may receive an error “An invalid argument was supplied” when accessing files or running programs from a shared folder using the SMBv1 protocol.  

    Enable SMBv2 or SMBv3 on both the SMB server and the SMB client, as described in KB2696547.

    Microsoft is working on a resolution that will be available later in June

    2.  https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_10-files/new-partitions-may-appear-in-file-explorer-after/115d2860-542e-410f-983c-2aeb8bbd7d13

    As far as I am aware the partition issue is still unfixed.

    3.  Watch out for third party vpn programs  Barb helped a recent forum user that had kerio VPN software – it got to a certain percent and barfed

    Issues that have been fixed

    1.  Alienware no longer blocked  – https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_10-windows_install/hybrid-laptops-with-discrete-gpu-connected-to/3518f6b4-c267-4d38-b5b9-d5ea0c16e975

    2. Surface SSD’s okay to install since May — https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_10-windows_install/devices-with-intel-ssd-600p-series-or-intel-ssd/703ab5d8-d93e-4321-b8cc-c70ce22ce2f1

    (*) yup screwed up and had them the other way around, now fixed.  Thanks Zero2Dash

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    Home Forums Patch Lady – 1803 declared Semi-annual

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    This topic contains 33 replies, has 15 voices, and was last updated by

     mcbsys 9 months, 1 week ago.

    • Author
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    • #197851 Reply

      Susan Bradley
      AskWoody MVP

      Microsoft today declared 1803 as “ready for business” and is flipping from the Semi-annual targeted (the old CBB) to Semi-annual (the old CB). What th
      [See the full post at: Patch Lady – 1803 declared Semi-annual]

      Susan Bradley Patch Lady

      7 users thanked author for this post.
    • #197856 Reply

      zero2dash
      AskWoody Lounger

      You goofed up on SAC(T) being CBB and SAC being CB…it’s the other way around. 🙂

      1803 being changed to SAC is absurd, absolutely absurd. I don’t recall seeing this many issues with any other build of Win10 at this point in its’ life as they’ve had with 1803, so them actually choosing to push it on everyone who isn’t specifically deferring by x days is just absurd.

      1703 and 1709 should remain SAC; 1803 shouldn’t be until 1809 IMHO.

      Every commercial and talk I see of MS and AI just makes me question whether there’s not a rootkit in Win10 that works (similar to distributed computing such as Folding@Home) and takes 1% or less of every computer running 10’s CPU on the planet, to provide MS with one giant botnet. AI AI AI…Win10 Win10 Win10. Coincidence? You be the judges. 😮

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #197869 Reply

      John
      AskWoody Lounger

      I agree, seems a bit premature to claim 1803 is ready especially after last month mess.

    • #197874 Reply

      woody
      Da Boss

      Oh brother.

      I hope this isn’t a preview of inanities to come — when MS tells us the new SAC-T definitions and criteria.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #197875 Reply

      anonymous

      According to https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/itpro/windows-10/release-information, Windows 10 1803 is still Semi-Annual Channel (Targeted).

      • #197890 Reply

        anonymous

        We saw it happen three times with Win10 1709. Now we’re getting reports of Win10 1803 being pushed to Pro PCs with “branch readiness” set to Semi-Annual Channel — the setting that’s supposed to specifically keep 1803 away until it’s ready.

        https://www.computerworld.com/article/3275955/microsoft-windows/microsoft-pushing-win10-version-1803-to-pcs-specifically-set-to-avoid-it.html

      • #197961 Reply

        anonymous

        I chuckled when I read this page and saw 1803 highlighted with “Microsoft recommends”

      • #197973 Reply

        anonymous

        Windows 10 April 2018 Update (1803) is now fully available

        Based on the update quality and reliability we are seeing through our AI approach, we are now expanding the release broadly to make the April 2018 Update (version 1803) fully available for all compatible devices running Windows 10 worldwide. Full availability is the final phase of our rollout process. You don’t have to do anything to get the update; it will rollout automatically to you through Windows Update.

        Enterprise customers can also follow the same targeted approach for the Semi-Annual Channel and fully deploy Windows 10, version 1803 when ready. IT administrators can decide when to broadly deploy once you have validated the apps, devices, and infrastructure in your organization work well with this release.

        ???

        https://blogs.windows.com/windowsexperience/2018/06/14/ai-powers-windows-10-april-2018-update-rollout/

        M$ seems to be ignoring the fact that computers that have been bricked or borked(and then converted to Win 7/8.1 and Linux) by the Windows 10 1803 Update would not be sending back any Win 10 Telemetry & Data to M$.

        AI = artificial intelligence = not real super human intelligence = can sometimes be non-intelligent or stupid.

        3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #197881 Reply

      anonymous

      Up to Win 10 1703, the designation of SAC/CBB was about 4 months after release.
      For Win 10 1709, the designation of SAC dropped to about 3 months after release.
      Now for Win 10 1803, it has drastically dropped to about 1.5 months after release.

      Seems, M$ can’t wait to forcibly recruit more Beta-testers among Win 10 Pro users.

      P S – In March 2018, M$ issued Win 10 CU KB4023057 to unblock Windows Update that had been disabled by users.

      • #197957 Reply

        Ascaris
        AskWoody_MVP

        1803 is declared semi-annual?  Did you mean semi-usable by any chance?  <g>

        Up to Win 10 1703, the designation of SAC/CBB was about 4 months after release. For Win 10 1709, the designation of SAC dropped to about 3 months after release. Now for Win 10 1803, it has drastically dropped to about 1.5 months after release.

        It seems that the time from release to SAC is inversely proportional to the amount of bugs within it.  The more buggy it is, the faster it is pushed to SAC, exactly opposite of what you would expect if you are in the habit of expecting things that make sense.  I guess that habit is another thing incompatible with Windows 10.

        Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.15.3 & Kubuntu 18.04).

        2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #197904 Reply

      Mr. Natural
      AskWoody Plus

      Microsoft is obviously aware of all the complaints and concerns over the handling of the “Windows as a service” model and having to change the entire update process due to this ridiculous notion of releasing a new OS version every 6 months.

      It’s really interesting that I rarely hear of any issues with updates that are still issued the old way such as MS Office activated with a product key and SQL server. Hats off to PKCano on the swift status update on these as they are released. Gee whiz even .Net updates are more reliable than Windows 10 cumulative updates.

      I feel like this is a “in your face” statement with a complete disregard for everyone that makes use of their products. I’m beginning to think there are high level corporate salary bonuses based upon set goals and accomplishments.

      Red Ruffnsore reporting from the front lines.

      3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #197907 Reply

        PKCano
        Da Boss

        By 2020, when Windows is an Azure cloud-based VM and not a local OS, they will put whatever they like in it and change it whenever they please. You will have absolutely no say-so and absolutely no control.

        They are just getting you ready for it.

        Absolute power corrupts absolutely.

        • #197909 Reply

          Mr. Natural
          AskWoody Plus

          I’m not sayin’ nothin’ man…….I’m just sayin’.  🙂

          Red Ruffnsore reporting from the front lines.

        • #197912 Reply

          RamRod
          AskWoody Lounger

          Wow…shoulda seen it coming.

          You’re a visionary PK. Wow. I’m depressed.

          RamRod

          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #197960 Reply

            Ascaris
            AskWoody_MVP

            That’s why I started the migration to Linux at the end of 2015.  Even by then, it was evident that Windows as we had known it was on borrowed time.  Windows 10 was released at the end of July 2015, and I found it terrible the first time I used it.  I hoped it would show some signs of improvement as feedback from real users poured in to Microsoft, and I had it installed on a test PC so I could monitor its progress.  Instead of getting better, it just kept getting worse.  I don’t mean that in terms of bugs, but in terms of the continued erosion of control a PC owner had over his own computer.  People called Microsoft’s actions boneheaded or tone-deaf, but the scenario was really something a lot more sinister than that.

            That was when I wiped my test PC’s Windows 10 installation (a free upgrade from 7, but one that was definitely not a good value even so) and repurposed its SSD as a Linux boot device for my main PC (so Windows and Linux each have their own 128GB SSD, with data on a conventional rust spinner).

            I’ve come to appreciate many things about Linux, but I’m not migrating because of some lofty ideas about free software or because I oppose commercial software (I don’t).  It’s more that I don’t have any other reasonable choice with my own hardware.  I could go Mac, but then I would have to buy yet another PC (officially) and I already have way too many for one person.  I only need a new OS, not a new PC.

            MS fans like to tease Linux users who suggest that Windows will fall and be replaced by Linux.  They invariably make some joke about this finally being the year of Linux (which apparently was predicted many times in the past, but it never came true).  It’s different now, though; in all those other times, betting on Linux would mean betting against Microsoft.  Now, betting against Windows (such that we have known it, as a standalone, general-purpose OS) is betting on Microsoft.

            I don’t know if it will be Linux that takes up the mantle of being the definitive PC OS.  I would like it to be, rather than some other proprietary corporate product that has all of the same inherent issues as Windows.  It seems that no matter what the software, there will come a point when the devs seem to lose the plot and go in some weird direction, alienating a substantial part of their customer base.

            It’s not just proprietary software that often ends up in disaster when the developers of the product decide to go off in some weird, unpopular direction.  With open source, though, this will almost invariably lead to a fork, if there isn’t one already.  Spreading the already scarce resources in the open source world even thinner is not ideal, but it is a lot better than having to accept whatever the developers have decided for you.  GNOME 3 gave us Cinnamon; Firefox gave us Waterfox, Basilisk, and Pale Moon; Ubuntu gave us Mint. The latter two were forked years before the devs of the original products lost their minds, but they became that much more important when that happened.

            Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.15.3 & Kubuntu 18.04).

            4 users thanked author for this post.
            • #197962 Reply

              anonymous

              “there will come a point when the devs seem to lose the plot and go in some weird direction”

              The current state of Windows perfectly described!

              2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #197991 Reply

          anonymous

          I’m thinking that an in-between step – between what we have now and the possible Azure service – would be a “windows 10 click-to-run” where everything happens silently in the background like it currently does with office.

        • #198035 Reply

          Jan K.
          AskWoody Lounger

          By 2020, when Windows is an Azure cloud-based VM and not a local OS, they will put whatever they like in it and change it whenever they please. You will have absolutely no say-so and absolutely no control.

          They are just getting you ready for it.

          Oh! I’m ready for it!

          And Microsoft will have absolutely no say and no control.

          2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #198064 Reply

          Mr. Natural
          AskWoody Plus

          Cue Rush sound byte – “We have assumed control”

          Red Ruffnsore reporting from the front lines.

          Attachments:
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          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #198070 Reply

            BobbyB
            AskWoody Lounger

            “We have assumed control”

            Might Just have to delve in the Groove Archive and play Some early Rush again 🙂

            • This reply was modified 9 months, 1 week ago by
               BobbyB.
            • #198093 Reply

              anonymous

              Red Barchetta from Moving Pictures always feels good to me. I have to stop myself from setting it on loop. I want it to always be fresh. Right up to the time of two-lane air cars. Can Azure cross a one lane bridge? (does an air car need a bridge?)

      • #197983 Reply

        anonymous

        PKCano wrote; … By 2020, when Windows is an Azure cloud-based VM and not a local OS,

        Doubt this will happen.

        I think, after 2020, Win 10 will become more like subscription-based Office 365. Subscription-based Micro$oft 365 and Win 10 Ent E3 & E5 are already available. M$ is likely salivating at the prospect of getting increased and assured annual revenue stream like that of Netflix, AT&T, Comcast, etc, after 2020.

        Example: in a Home or Company, one AT&T(ISP) subscriber account is usually used by a few or many Windows Home-users/Company-employees. After 2020, if M$ is able to convert all Win 10 users to subscribers, imagine the increased revenue stream for M$.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #197930 Reply

      JohnW
      AskWoody Plus

      Well, on a whim today I let my Win10 Home 1709 laptop update to 1803.

      Not my main desktop, so it was semi-expendable, but I was just curious…

      Everything seems stable and performing well, nothing out of the ordinary.  Except as in the last few Windows feature updates, it has restored the hibernate feature.  Easy to disable, but some folks might want to avoid that, especially if they had already disabled hibernate (and/or fast startup).

    • #197925 Reply

      anonymous

      I am seriously wondering… All this pushing and disrespecting user settings and wishes might not be allowed under the strict new European laws. Might be interesting to dig into that and ask around a bit at the right people there. What happens with Windows 10 is an absolute depth in how users should be treated. It irritates me personally to the max, and I hear the same sounds from many collegues and people around me.
      Never was anti-anything in relation to software, but this OS in my opinion should dissappear as soon as possible.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #197943 Reply

        JohnW
        AskWoody Plus

        I think that Win10 will eventually be regarded as an office appliance only, as home and independent users seek out and migrate to alternatives for personal computing.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #197985 Reply

        anonymous

        Likely, Anti-trust and Consumer Protection laws will only be applied by governing authorities if Windows is considered a monopoly.
        At present, Windows is only a market-monopoly, ie computer-users can still opt for a different market, eg enterprises can opt for Red Hat Enterprise Linux, en masse.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #198050 Reply

          anonymous

          That’s not true anymore. The new laws forbid companies ignoring users wishes and settings. Plain and clear stated. So that means Windows is not working according those laws.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #197953 Reply

      Noel Carboni
      AskWoody_MVP

      I have to say, I’ve been testing pretty heavily lately, and even doing some development, on my Win 10 v1803 VM. It’s not been bad at all. From my perspective it’s been quite solid and reliable. I can’t say I could object to the promotion from any personal experience.

      Of course, none of us uses ALL of the operating system.

      Microsoft finally has done some good things with per-monitor scaling, for example. Application makers now have no excuse not to support your 100 ppi extra monitor next to your big 200 ppi 4K monitor.

      This ridiculously frantic pace of releases and patches, though, is still a good, hard reason NOT to upgrade a reliable Win 8.1 system running on hardware to Win 10 vanything. Thank goodness for virtual machines.

      Is there an ISO available from Microsoft that represents the Semi-Annual Channel version?

      What’s the build number? I seem to still have 17134.81, while a friend reported he just got 17134.1hundredsomething…

      -Noel

      • #197965 Reply

        anonymous

        According MS’s “Windows 10 update history” page, the latest build for 1803 is 17134.112 (KB4284835)

    • #197974 Reply

      anonymous

      My laptop upgraded to 1803 on its own, and now I – and thousands of others – can’t turn the brightness down. Also every restart changes the keyboard from U.K. to U.S. configuration. Also every restart changes the update settings.

    • #198002 Reply

      anonymous

      We have held off on 1803 because it has a new feature that looks more like a bug to us. Described here.

      As a result, we’re going to hide Account Protection as described here.

      Microsoft may tout how wonderful WaaS is because users ‘love the new features.’ New features like this one simply make IT Pros busier with additional unnecessary support calls.

      We miss the days of rolling out service packs because the IT Pro life was so much simpler back then, despite what Microsoft may believe.

      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #198040 Reply

      AlexEiffel
      AskWoody_MVP

      I wonder how they can declare it SAC without having fixed the issue where a recovery partition suddenly appears as a normal almost full empty drive to lambda users wondering why Windows keeps telling them they have too much file.

    • #198337 Reply

      mcbsys
      AskWoody Lounger

      Susan – Is the deferral period counted from the initial release day (April 30) or from the day they convert it from Targeted to Semi-Annual (June 14)?

      Also, here’s another bug I haven’t seen mentioned here: 1803 breaks AppData folder redirection (could be a deal-breaker in some domain environments):

      https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4294935/folder-redirection-not-available-for-appdata-roaming-folder-win-10

    Please follow the -Lounge Rules- no personal attacks, no swearing, and politics/religion are relegated to the Rants forum.

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