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  • Patch Lady – Last call for your opinion

    Posted on July 6th, 2018 at 17:21 Susan Bradley Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Just a heads up for any procrastinators…. I’ll be closing up the patching survey over the weekend and then will be writing up some overall thoughts regarding the feedback gathered.

    As others have pointed out… this isn’t scientific.  It’s not a random survey taken with random people with margins of errors that can be quantified.  I’m asking in venues where people are hyper sensitized to patching…but that’s my point.  We are the deep in the weeds folks and this survey is to hear from you.  John Q. Public who doesn’t care about Windows updating is more than likely the typical Windows user of today… that is they use Windows at the office where it’s managed by someone or something and at home they have tablets and phones…. and NOTHING at home is on Windows any more.  It’s all Android tablets and Kindles and Rokus and Alexas and FireTV and…. you get the point.

    A few years back I had a good friend that at least once a quarter called me to help him and other family members get out of a jam on their PCs.  And then the kids bought Macs and … you get the idea… I don’t talk to him that much regarding computers anymore.

    The typical Windows user of old, is no longer the typical Windows user.  It’s no wonder that 7 still holds market share over 10.  Don’t get me wrong I really like 10, but for all of the fixes and changes in Windows update, it still very much feels like a work in process.  And the lack of communication and documentation doesn’t help.  Too often we assume based on what we see on the systems we control and don’t get any sort of confirmation of new changes or behaviors other than confirming with each other that we’ve seen that as well.

    Case in point is the new “cumulative” process.  If you manually “MU” a Windows Server 2016 it will install KB4284880… the June 12th security/cumulative update.  Reboot and it will be offered up KB4284833, a June 21st cumulative update that includes the security updates from June 12th.  Say what?   I thought we are in the cumulative updating model for Windows 10/Server 2016?  (remember server 2016 GUI version is back on the 1607 release — it’s the equivalent of Windows 10 1607 LTSB).  Also it’s not on WSUS for those that do corporate patching.  So why the inconsistent “metadata” so that a cumulative update isn’t seen as cumulative?

    I also noted recently that https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4284848 is called “Dynamic Cumulative Update for Windows 10” in my WSUS server.  Normally the use of “dynamic update” was used in the compatibility fix updates needed to fix blocking issues.  So exactly what meant by a dynamic cumulative update?  Normally the use of the word “dynamic” meant that the update had code in it to help you get from version to version.  But KB4284848 is for Windows 10 1803?  We’re not going to a new feature release yet.  And why are just about every Windows 10 release getting two updates a month now as the norm?

    And speaking of dynamic updates — why can’t Microsoft provide a list somewhere of when issues have been resolved?  Case in point the issue with the additional drive letters that get triggered on OEM partitions after 1803 is installed.  I can’t tell you definitively if it’s been fixed or not through the dynamic updating process.  All it would take is to document in this KB what the fixed items are.

    Bottom line there’s a lot of patching issues that could be resolved with plain old communication and documentation.  So here’s your chance to join with others and communicate to Microsoft.  Last call for the patching survey!  And look for my thoughts and conclusions on the topic.

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    Home Forums Patch Lady – Last call for your opinion

    This topic contains 20 replies, has 12 voices, and was last updated by  AlexEiffel 1 month ago.

    • Author
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    • #201910 Reply

      Susan Bradley
      AskWoody MVP

      Just a heads up for any procrastinators…. I’ll be closing up the patching survey over the weekend and then will be writing up some overall thoughts
      [See the full post at: Patch Lady – Last call for your opinion]

      Susan Bradley Patch Lady

      5 users thanked author for this post.
    • #202011 Reply

      anonymous

      KB4284848 is not showing up on my WSUS server.  Any idea why?

    • #202014 Reply

      lurks about
      AskWoody Lounger

      While not really a target for the survey, I think trying to get a sense of the problems people are facing is a critical first step (good job btw). I am not to concerned about the ‘scientific validity’ of the survey (most surveys are not really valid anyway) but what types of problems are reported with some sense of the relative frequency of those problems.

      Unfortunately, I do not think MS will pay any attention to these results because they will probably undermine the entire WaaS strategy.

      My Windows boxes are not allowed on the Internet and are only used for a couple of ancient legacy programs.

    • #202016 Reply

      PKCano
      AskWoody MVP

      There’s another real-life case of what the updates do to unsuspecting people here. This is really a shame.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #202027 Reply

      anonymous

      Windows used to be a PC user’s dream because it was so easily customisable to one’s own preferences, thanks – in many ways – to the registry.

      Now that Micorosoft has deliberately obfuscated not just the registry but also filenames and folders, it’s just an unholy mess. No wonder that people like Ivo Beltchev (creator of Classic Shell) have given up.

      Who in their right minds would buy into this new MS paradigm unless they had no choice?

      4 users thanked author for this post.
      • #202089 Reply

        anonymous

        The registry is a huge burden from the past and one of the main reasons Windows sooner or later will run into troubles. For an average user the only solution left then is – if the problems are severe enough – clean install. As also often is the standard advice of their fantastic Indian helpdesk. It’s why people see it as normal to reinstall Windows clean about once a year. It’s like swapping the engine of your car on a yearly basis. For some strange reason, no one would accept that though… 😀

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #202196 Reply

          Jan K.
          AskWoody Lounger

          The registry is a huge burden from the past and one of the main reasons Windows sooner or later will run into troubles. For an average user the only solution left then is – if the problems are severe enough – clean install.

          Clean installs are for unprepared users only.

          For me that would probably be a full day’s work… instead I’ll just grab latest stable system backup and restore that. 10 minutes job.

          In these days having a detailed and tested backup and restore plan in place is a must.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #202231 Reply

            OscarCP
            AskWoody Lounger

            The registry is a huge burden from the past and one of the main reasons Windows sooner or later will run into troubles.

            This is so right! The registry is indeed a major vulnerability in Windows: a single point of failure that, for such an essential component, would rate a “criticality 1” in NASA-speak, somehow like the infamous rubber coating on the Shuttle or the O-rings in the Shuttle’s solid-fuel boosters. It always has worried me when doing a software install or upgrade of the kind that gets recorded in the register during this operation, that doing so might corrupt this file and brick my much needed PC, because of some faulty design of that particular software installer, something that, while not very likely, still is within the realm of possibilities. And yes, there are ways around this, but why should it even be necessary to take care of such a problem, which in a soundly engineered system should simply not exist?

            I have a Mac, whose OS is based on BSD and, in every way that matters, works just like LINUX. So it does not have a registry, but is, nevertheless, as easy to install software or update it as in Windows, at the GUI-level, and at the command-line level there are applications for installing open-source software, such as “homebrew”, where all it takes is to invoke it with the URL of the download site as argument. Then hit “Return”, sit back, and watch it happen.

            And never mind all those adds offering “cleaning” software that among other wonderful things promise to fix one’s register, that obviously (in the cleaner-makers’ opinion) is in terribly shape and just about to give up the ghost and take us down to computing hell with it.

            • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by  OscarCP.
    • #202074 Reply

      Noel Carboni
      AskWoody MVP

      Responded.

      You didn’t go long enough on the release timing. The most extreme entry, “Every 2 years”, is still too often.

      -Noel

      4 users thanked author for this post.
      • #202320 Reply

        Ascaris
        AskWoody MVP

        Well, Linux Mint releases on a 2 year schedule for major releases, but they’re supported for five years, so if you don’t want the new features (zero pressure to upgrade if you don’t want to), you’re still set for a good half a decade.  The cadence between releases (and how suitable that is) depends on how long they’re supported after the release, IMO.

         

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #202348 Reply

          AlexEiffel
          AskWoody MVP

          And how they handle bugs or “features”. I am on 1703 but the search is still broken and they only fix it on 1709. It was a feature not to show files from outside the documents folder when you search with Cortana after having replaced the better classic Windows search with that inferior click-fest and huge display but short list of results of a mess that Cortana search provides.

          Some companies seem to generate profit by purposefully not fixing issues until a new release so they can charge you for upgrades you wouldn’t do otherwise…

          • #202359 Reply

            anonymous

            I am currently using 1709 .522, but when I got 1703 that re-started the “web search”, I was able to modify / edit the Registry with the instructions at this website:  https://www.ctrl.blog/entry/how-to-disable-cortana  and then only have local computer search with no cortana web search.  It is still working that way with 1709. Do not know if it will work with 1803. Hope that this info may be helpful.

            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #202743 Reply

              AlexEiffel
              AskWoody MVP

              I don’t have web searches with 1703 because I use group policies to disable them. However, in 1803, Microsoft ignores the group policies for this “feature” on the Pro version. They are getting farther away from the “Pro” name with each “feature” update.

    • #202195 Reply

      Jan K.
      AskWoody Lounger

      As others have pointed out… this isn’t scientific. It’s not a random survey taken with random people with margins of errors that can be quantified.

      Well, you’re harvesting empirical data, which is basic science. So… 😀

      Looking forward to your conclusion though I don’t think there’ll be any surprises.

      My guess is, users don’t think Microsoft is building Windows the way they would prefer it to be…

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #202403 Reply

      Seff
      AskWoody Lounger

      I’ve completed the survey although I found it frustrating that it led me into it with a general question about Windows 7 to Windows 10 and then it was all about Windows 10 – which I don’t use. It’s a shame it didn’t probe a bit about post-EOL intentions in relation to Windows 7.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #202417 Reply

        Kranium
        AskWoody Lounger

        Same here – turns out this is a Win 10 survey only. Except for the first question. Should have mentioned this up-front.

        Group B - soon to be Group "I give up - Linux it is!"

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #202551 Reply

      Microfix
      AskWoody MVP

      Ever since the proverbial hit the fan in the global 2008 financial crisis, the business fan has been speeding up and the mess is ever increasing. When times get tough for business irrespective of whether digital, mechanical or products, they engineer things or parts to fail! MSFT’s ability to do this is cataloged in this forum in the form of patches, upgrades and useless features, why don’t they just have a look here.

      Note: Not a W10 user and not likely to be in it’s current / predictive/ road map state.

      | 2x Group A- W8.1x64 | Group A+ Linux x64 Hybrid | Group B W7x64 Pro | Group W XP Pro
        No problem can be solved from the same level of consciousness that created IT - AE

    Please follow the -Lounge Rules- no personal attacks, no swearing, and politics/religion are relegated to the Rants forum.

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