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  • Patch Lady – proving that documentation is key

    Posted on March 7th, 2018 at 01:40 Susan Bradley Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Patch Lady here:  Tonight I noticed that the recent update for Windows 10 1709 KB4090913 now includes the following in the release notes indicating that it DOES address the problem with the race condition that occurred in the January and February updating cycles.

    • Addresses issue where some USB devices and onboard devices, such as a built-in laptop camera, keyboard, or mouse, stop working. This may occur when the Windows Update servicing stack incorrectly skips installing the newer version of some critical drivers in the cumulative update and uninstalls the currently active drivers during maintenance.  (that sentence was there before)
    • Addresses issue where some devices may fail to boot with “INACCESSIBLE_BOOT_DEVICE”.  (AH HA, this is new!)

    That last one was not in the original KB release.  So now that it appears that this KB does help prevent this issue, let’s look at the issues left to worry about:

    Windows Update History reports that KB4054517 failed to install because of error 0x80070643. Even though the update was successfully installed, Windows Update incorrectly reports that the update failed to install. Select Check for Updates to verify that there are no additional updates available.

    You can also type About your PC in the search box on the taskbar to verify that your device is using the expected OS build.

    Microsoft is working on a resolution and will provide an update in an upcoming release.

    This is a minor cosmetic-y issue in my opinion and can be (annoyingly) ignored.

    Because of an issue that affects some versions of antivirus software, this fix applies only to computers on which the antivirus ISV updated the ALLOW REGKEY. Contact your antivirus manufacturer to verify that their software is compatible and that they have set the following REGKEY on the computer:

    Key=”HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE”Subkey=”SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\QualityCompat”

    Value Name=”cadca5fe-87d3-4b96-b7fb-a231484277cc”

    Type=”REG_DWORD”

    Data=”0x00000000”

    That is a standard “known” issue after the Spectre/Meltdown patch era and will be included as a known issue going forward for all cumulative updates.

    Because of an AD FS server issue that causes the WID AD FS database to become unusable after a restart, the AD FS service may fail to start. There is no way to undo the database corruption. To return your AD FS server to a functional state, you must restore it from a backup.

    That side effect only impacts customers running 1709 Server core and Windows server 2016.  While concerning (and pointing out that we still need backups), it won’t impact Windows 10 1709.

    Am I ready to give this update the all clear?

    Well?  Um… how about we still wait a few more days to just make sure there isn’t any more side effects.

    If that helped, take a second to support AskWoody on Patreon

    Home Forums Patch Lady – proving that documentation is key

    This topic contains 21 replies, has 13 voices, and was last updated by  anonymous 9 months, 2 weeks ago.

    • Author
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    • #173091 Reply

      Susan Bradley
      AskWoody MVP

      Patch Lady here:  Tonight I noticed that the recent update for Windows 10 1709 KB4090913 now includes the following in the release notes indicating th
      [See the full post at: Patch Lady – proving that documentation is key]

      Susan Bradley Patch Lady

      4 users thanked author for this post.
    • #173095 Reply

      woody
      Da Boss

      Man, I have my fingers crossed.

      Wonder why they didn’t document the INACCESSIBLE part, in the first place?

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #173096 Reply

        Susan Bradley
        AskWoody MVP

        No kidding.  That was a biggie to overlook.

        Susan Bradley Patch Lady

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #173116 Reply

        Ascaris
        AskWoody MVP

        Remember this quote from Microsoft‘s Brad Anderson?

        “Our long term vision on Windows 10 management is that organisations should rely on Microsoft to do more for them on their behalf. Let us worry about your images. Let us keep your devices updated through Windows Update for Business. Rather than you approving which patches you want, we are saying let them all flow because the way organisations get the most secure, the most compliant, the most reliable and most performance devices is to stay updated with all of our updates.”

        While that blurb was clearly about enterprise updating, it’s quite obvious that their attitude about “let us worry about it” carries over into the consumer sector as well, with even more control demanded by Microsoft over the machines upon which Windows runs than in the enterprise sector.

        Wouldn’t the relative paucity of documentation just fit very well with the sentiment expressed in that quote?  If we are to let Microsoft handle updating and not pick and choose the patches ourselves, do we even need patch notes?

        Whether that omission was a mistake or a deliberate decision, of course, is yet to be seen, but it can safely be said that ever since the dawn of the Windows 10 era, Microsoft has been seen many times engaging in behavior that can only be described as testing the limits, finding out what Windows users will tolerate and what they will not.

        Interesting times we live in– unfortunately.

         

        Group L (Linux): KDE Neon User Edition 5.14.4 (based on Ubuntu 18.04) + Windows 7 in Virtualbox VM

        3 users thanked author for this post.
        • #173142 Reply

          WildBill
          AskWoody Lounger

          Whether that omission was a mistake or a deliberate decision, of course, is yet to be seen, but it can safely be said that ever since the dawn of the Windows 10 era, Microsoft has been seen many times engaging in behavior that can only be described as testing the limits, finding out what Windows users will tolerate and what they will not. Interesting times we live in– unfortunately.

          That is also the famous (infamous?) Chinese curse: “May you live in interesting times.”

          Windows 8.1, 64-bit, now in Group B!
          Wild Bill Rides Again...

          2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #173238 Reply

          anonymous

          It could be argued that Microsoft isn’t testing the limits of what Windows users will tolerate but that it is continually setting new limits.  Unfortunately, the painful reality is that Microsoft has no limits when it comes to forcing its own agenda on users and disingenuously minimizing the fallout from policies and procedures that have turned Windows Update into a malware delivery channel.

          2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #173532 Reply

          anonymous

          In an age where transparency is becoming more and more important to computer users the world over, isn’t it interesting that Microsoft thinks they can get away with not releasing patch notes and saying “We know the best for you, so shut up and just install our patches!”?

          Who knows what they’re installing onto our computers: spyware and adware and bloatware, no doubt. Yep, we really should trust you because you are omnipotent and omnibenevolent, and we should just fall in line with you and not question you. Yeah, no. There’s no such thing as an incorruptible human. Be transparent, hold yourself accountable for your blunders, and let everyone see what you’re doing so we can be more confident that you’re not up to anything nefarious.

    • #173110 Reply

      GoneToPlaid
      AskWoody Lounger

      I love your new super cool Patch Lady logo.

      5 users thanked author for this post.
    • #173111 Reply

      WildBill
      AskWoody Lounger

      Forgive me for being very petty (since I’m still on Windows 8.1 & any Win 10 updates are irrelevant to me)… but I Love your New Logo for these posts! The 4 Windows colors in the shield… & the band-aid caps it off. Plus your title… “Susan Bradley — Patch Lady”. If you don’t have business cards like this… you Should!  You & the main MVP’s should get “00” designations, like a certain agent does in the movies. Agent “001”… “Bradley… Susan Bradley. I’m the Patch Lady.”

      Windows 8.1, 64-bit, now in Group B!
      Wild Bill Rides Again...

      3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #173112 Reply

        GoneToPlaid
        AskWoody Lounger

        Hah! I initially didn’t notice the band-aid. Yeah, Patch Lady’s logo is slicker than greased lightning.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #173119 Reply

      JB
      AskWoody Lounger

      Have downloaded KB4090913 and now have 16299.251.

      However a peculiar problem on 3 PCs. Everything appears to operate correctly for about half an hour then some apps take a minute to open and then can freeze when closed down. All happened since changed to 16299.214

      Google Chrome does not seem to be affected but some short cuts in GOOGLE sometimes do not function but going directly to the web site does function!!!

      Still the same after the updates

      JB

    • #173136 Reply

      MrBrian
      AskWoody MVP

      It’s a good idea to also manually compare the issues in the “Known issues in this update” section of two given Windows 10 builds (or Windows 7 or 8.1 rollups) to check if an issue has been fixed in the newer build (or rollup).

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #173141 Reply

      MrBrian
      AskWoody MVP

      “That last one was not in the original KB release.”

      That is true indeed. Here is an older version of that article: http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:https%3A%2F%2Fsupport.microsoft.com%2Fen-us%2Fhelp%2F4090913%2Fmarch5-2018kb4090913osbuild16299-251.

      Sitemap https://support.microsoft.com/sitemap_en-us_help_81 (one of the many sitemaps used by the KBNew-generating macros) currently lists the “lastmod” date for KB4090913 as 2018-03-05, but the “Last Updated” date on https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4090913/march5-2018kb4090913osbuild16299-251 is “Mar 6, 2018.”

      • This reply was modified 9 months, 2 weeks ago by  MrBrian.
      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #173203 Reply

        woody
        Da Boss

        Thanks for running that down! Amazing what MS sneaks in.

        I just re-ran the KBNew list and, sure enough, the “lastmod” date is March 5.

        Only possible conclusion: Somebody snuck in a change to the KB article without triggering an entry in the update list.

        Oy.

    • #173148 Reply

      Elly
      AskWoody MVP

      Love the logo…. and the good info!

      Win 7 Home, 64 bit, Group B

    • #173199 Reply

      Seff
      AskWoody Lounger

      I too love the new Patch Lady logo, but is it just me or is the formatting of this article broken with different paragraphs all over the place?

      • #173201 Reply

        anonymous

        Hi Seff,

        Broken for me also.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #173235 Reply

          anonymous

          @seff @anonymous –

          are you referring to the portions where PL pasted in the KB release notes?  MS has the same format in the KB article so that’s why it looks that way

          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #173298 Reply

            Seff
            AskWoody Lounger

            I guess so, now you ask the question it does kinda explain it, although it still looks very odd.

    • #173207 Reply

      OlderGeeks.com
      AskWoody Lounger

      So here’s a question… we have many users who we backed out of the bad updates and turned off their updates until they hear from us. If they turn those updates on, will Windows try to go ahead and immediately install the bad update or will it stop that one and install the new one.

      OlderGeeks.com - No ads, no crapware, no b.s.

      • #173240 Reply

        The Surfing Pensioner
        AskWoody Lounger

        On Windows 7, you just change the WU setting from “Never check for Updates” to “Check for Updates but let me decide whether to download and install” and wait for the results. Then you hide the updates you don’t want to install, and download the rest. Finally, you change your WU setting back to “Never check for Updates”. No problem – you get to select the updates of your choice. As I understand it, patches that Windows have acknowledged as buggy and replaced will automatically be withdrawn.

        I believe update control is somewhat more complicated on W10. That’s one reason I don’t want it; there are others.

    • #173208 Reply

      cmar6
      AskWoody Lounger

      It is great to have Patch Lady onboard helping Woody on this key issue of when it is safe to update Win 10, especially ver. 1709. It is better to be safe than sorry, better to be a little late than a little early. So we will watch here for Susan to give us the all clear, even if it takes a week or 2 or 3.

    • #173205 Reply

      anonymous

      Hi Susan,

      Posted in the forums link with Problems with Update about my experience.

      TLDR:
      Machine came up yesterday with Inaccessible Boot. DISM remove last patch Rollup 16299.248.1.17. Reboot. Updates finish installing. Review Installed Updates,  KB4090913 shows it needs restart. After 3 restarts 4090913 still shows it needs restart.  DISM shows 4090914 installed and Rollup 16299.251.1.4 installed. Machine working. Do not know which patch caused boot issue.

      Thanks for your posts,
      Victor

       

    Please follow the -Lounge Rules- no personal attacks, no swearing, and politics/religion are relegated to the Rants forum.

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