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  • Patch Lady – vendors start to shut the doors on Windows 7

    Posted on December 31st, 2018 at 11:56 Susan Bradley Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    CCH or Commerce Clearing House is one one of several major tax software vendors — they just sent me this email this morning …..

    CCH will discontinue support of Microsoft® Windows® 7 in our software products as of November 30, 2019. While we expect that many of our products will continue to function on the Windows® 7 operating system, CCH’s ability to sufficiently test products and diagnose software issues for customers using Windows® 7 will officially end November 30, 2019. For tax customers, this means that our first release of the 2019 tax software, scheduled for early December 2019, will not be officially supported on the Windows® 7 operating system, although it is likely to continue working for some period of time. In addition, customers using Windows® 7 who contact CCH Technical Support may be asked to upgrade their Microsoft® software if their issue cannot be reproduced with currently supported software, or if the problem is determined to be linked to the use of Windows® 7.

    Much like Windows® XP, the Windows® 7 operating system was very popular. However, Microsoft® has announced that they, too, will discontinue support for Windows® 7 as of January 14, 2020. Here is a link to their Windows 7 Lifecycle page. We are requesting that customers using Windows® 7 begin upgrading following the mid-April filing deadline so we can continue to provide the high level of support you expect from CCH. We are providing advanced notice in an effort to give our clients ample time to upgrade.

    Note: This notice regarding discontinued support for Windows® 7 will have no implications on the upcoming 2018 tax filing season. Additional reminders will be sent out post April 15, 2019.

    The countdown has started….

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    Home Forums Patch Lady – vendors start to shut the doors on Windows 7

    This topic contains 44 replies, has 20 voices, and was last updated by  anonymous 1 week, 1 day ago.

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    • #243333 Reply

      Susan Bradley
      AskWoody_MVP

      CCH or Commerce Clearing House is one one of several major tax software vendors — they just sent me this email this morning ….. CCH will discontinue
      [See the full post at: Patch Lady – vendors start to shut the doors on Windows 7]

      Susan Bradley Patch Lady

      8 users thanked author for this post.
    • #243343 Reply

      Charlie
      AskWoody Lounger

      Why??  There is still a full year of MS support on Win 7.  Why jump the gun?  It sounds to me like someone at CCH got their dates wrong!

      Win 7 Home Premium, x64, Intel i3-2120 3.3GHz, Group B

      • This reply was modified 2 weeks, 1 day ago by
         Charlie.
      • This reply was modified 2 weeks, 1 day ago by
         PKCano.
      • #243359 Reply

        Susan Bradley
        AskWoody_MVP

        Not really jumping the gun – end of support is January of 2020, the tax season starts then.  CCH doesn’t want folks to install the 2019 tax software and then in January – before we start to efile for the 2019 tax year – they are unsupported by Microsoft.  So saying as of November you are out is just a clean cut off.  We need to be on a supported software platform BEFORE we start the tax filing season.

        Susan Bradley Patch Lady

        3 users thanked author for this post.
        • #243545 Reply

          MrJimPhelps
          AskWoody Plus

          That’s true – most people will use the 2019 software AFTER Windows 7 goes out of support in Jan of 2020. So it makes sense that they would announce this BEFORE people buy the 2019 tax software.

          Group "L" (Linux Mint)
          with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
      • #243518 Reply

        Ascaris
        AskWoody_MVP

        If they think it is in their best interest to cut off up to half of their Windows customer base (depending on whose statistics you use), by all means, they should do it.  I wouldn’t!

        At least they understand what “not supported” means, unlike Microsoft (who thinks that “not supported” means “you’d better not try it, or we’ll break your stuff.”)

        It seems to me that this would be the perfect kind of thing to use a web application for, more so than a web version of a word processor or spreadsheet.  If you trust the company, anyway… but if you don’t, entering all that same data into a Win32 program published by a company you do not trust isn’t really much better.

        There’s always the option of a VM, of course, even if you still run Windows.  You could have a Windows 10 VM (guest) running under a Win 7 host, if it became absolutely necessary.

        Group "L" (KDE Neon Linux, based on Ubuntu 18.04)

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #243344 Reply

      EstherD
      AskWoody Plus

      Not entirely unexpected. Will be interesting to see what the consumer tax vendors do.

      As for me, NOT going to bring up and maintain a win10 system just to do taxes!

      Unfortunately, support for consumer tax SW on Mac and Linux is abysmal, IMHO. So it looks like it could be online tax prep for me in future… or back to paper 😉

    • #243353 Reply

      Charlie
      AskWoody Lounger

      This kind of thing is what speeds up a real EOL (End of Life) rather than just EOS (End of Support).  The support may get extended once the 80 or 90% of the Windows 7 users find out about it and hopefully raise cain.

      Win 7 Home Premium, x64, Intel i3-2120 3.3GHz, Group B

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #243387 Reply

      Karlston
      AskWoody Plus

      If Windows 7 folks have to upgrade, then give 8.1 a try. 8.1 support ends January 10 2023, 3 years after 7’s support ends.

      Once you replace the tile-infested native Start Menu with a cheap third-party one like Stardock Start8’s 7-like Start Menu, and turn off the Charms bar, it’s so much more like 7 than 10. Not a tile to be seen anywhere 🙂

      I can honestly say that my 2.5 year old 8.1 install has had zero BSOD’s, lockups, spontaneous reboots. Rock solid and reliable, even, dare I say it, more than 7 IME.

      Hanlon's Razor: Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by stupidity.

      • This reply was modified 2 weeks, 1 day ago by
         Karlston.
      3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #243416 Reply

        anonymous

        I may be wrong, but I don’t think there is a direct upgrade path from Win 7.1 to 8.1.  If one doesn’t want to blow away all the software installs on the computer, they must upgrade to 8.0 and then apply updates until the service pack upgrading to 8.1 show up.

        Under that understanding, that’s what I did about 2 years ago.  Remember 8.0 is pretty old now.   It kept some software installs intact, software I can’t easily replace.

         

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #243520 Reply

          Karlston
          AskWoody Plus

          Personally, I’d backup the 7 install as an image that can be file/folder accessed (Macrium Reflecty Free is my go-to for this), do an 8.1 clean install, then install all software and restore data. I’m ultra-careful, so I’d do the 8.1 install to a new SSD, keeping the 7 drive as a second backup.

          Yep, 8/8.1 are pretty old now, but newer than 7. And 8.1 gives you 3 more years of support over 7.

          IMO, still the preferable option over moving to 10.

          Hanlon's Razor: Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by stupidity.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #243532 Reply

            anonymous

            Once you configure a few things, 8.1 isn’t bad, there’s a few tiny features I like in it over 7. The only downside is the task bar is transparent. I have a hack in place to force it to be opaque, but really this should have been a built in feature.

            • #243629 Reply

              Microfix
              AskWoody_MVP

              W8.1 taskbar can be modified by settings in either Classic/Open shell or WinAeroTweaker, the two most useful tweakers for W8.1 in my book. The most annoying feature missing from W8.1 which should have been built in, is a white text function on dark windows themes.

              | W10 Pro x64 | W8.1 Pro x64 | Linux x64 Hybrids | XP Pro O/L
      • #243456 Reply

        anonymous

        The support for Windows 7 ends on January 2023. Yes, you get to pay the extra fee, but it’s well worth if for keeping using the best OS around.
        https://www.techspot.com/news/76354-microsoft-extends-paid-windows-7-support-until-2023.html

        • #243466 Reply

          DrBonzo
          AskWoody Lounger

          As stated in your link, you can only get the extended support for a fee if you have volume licensing. Most individuals don’t have that so for us the end of support or life or whatever you want to call it is January 14, 2020.

          2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #243395 Reply

      willygirl
      AskWoody Plus

      As noted, no surprise. I’ll go offline and use other equipment sources for online production. Very frustrating to live on the edge of what will take you the distance in safe mode. Not just an MS thing, Apple of course is running neck in neck with them for EOL products, creating mishaps to force users to upgrade with each OS. One way or another I’ll find a way to carry on without the headaches.

       

      Win7 Home, x64, GrpA

    • #243402 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Lounger

      I plan to continue using Windows 7 with the applications already installed before its end of life, and connecting to the Web only to fulfill certain basic actions needed to keep it working safely, such as using the same anti virus until it becomes incompatible with Windows 7, or until the Windows 7 PC finally gives up the ghost (or I do).

      For all other things that makes it necessary to connect to the Web, as well as for email, at first I will rely of a Mac I have been using without any trouble for the last year and a half and has, at a guess, plenty of life still left in it.

      For later, I am looking at the possibility of buying another PC and installing LINUX on it (with some help from my friends), or buying a PC with LINUX pre-installed, such as one of those Meerkat machines that have already been discussed here, at Woody’s, some time ago, although I would prefer an all-in-one laptop.

      I do have a Windows 8.1 installation disk, and could go the 8.1 route, but I am deeply allergic to fiddling with the operating system, let alone replacing it with a different one in the same machine, so I probably won’t.

      5 users thanked author for this post.
    • #243408 Reply

      Charlie
      AskWoody Lounger

      I’ll have to eventually use only Linux for going on the web.  While I prefer to stay with Windows, MS has lost me as a customer.  I don’t want to have to do a face job on Win 8.1 just to gain 3 more years of support which will fly by.

      Win 7 Home Premium, x64, Intel i3-2120 3.3GHz, Group B

      4 users thanked author for this post.
    • #243409 Reply

      anonymous

      Many people will leave the Windows trail at the end of the year, including companies. But many will also just jump to 10, so Microsoft will not care much about their loss. For them, the future isn’t Windows anyway.

    • #243423 Reply

      anonymous

      Wouldn’t it be nice if the tax code was simplified so that most or all of the IRS was no longer needed and companies like CCH were thus obsolete and discontinued too.

      4 users thanked author for this post.
      • #243562 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Lounger

        I do wonder: am I the only one here who does his taxes “by hand”, without using some tax software? Why is it better to use tax software? Is it because it does more than prevent some occasional error and offer some convenience? I would appreciate hearing from others about this, although I m afraid it might not be quite on topic here.

        • #244206 Reply

          mindwarp
          AskWoody Lounger

          Belated reply, as I just saw this: while I do e-file, using the supported links for free e-filing from my state’s department of revenue for free state and federal filing, I have generally done a rough draft on paper by hand of my (and in the past, when she lived nearby, my mother’s) taxes.  I do find that doing so in the past has helped get everything in order for me.

          That said, this year, anyone doing it by hand needs to seriously read up in advance about all of the changes to the federal forms.  There’s only one 1040 now, which itself is seemingly simpler, but there are more additional forms to file.  The new forms are up on the IRS website already, thankfully.  I’m glad that while I’m not in charge of the tax forms at work any more, I did help the person who took that over from me with ordering them this year, so I saw the drafts of the new forms and know I need to pay attention when doing my taxes. ;-D

    • #243429 Reply

      Nibbled To Death By Ducks
      AskWoody Lounger

      I may be the only one who is not “going quietly”, but I am going to try and do everything possible to raise a ruckus so MSFT finally extends the life of the OS, or someone steps up to support it for a small yearly fee.

      It worked for XP, where there were actually FEWER users vs. Win 7 now.

      We have the clout.   Let’s stop being herded and push back!

      The family motto is “Nihil Sine Conflicto”; (Loosely: Nothing gained without a fight.)

      Win7 Pro SP1 64-bit, Dell Latitude E6330, Intel CORE i5 "Ivy Bridge", Group "A/B [negative] :)", Multiple Air-Gapped backup drives in different locations, "Don't check for updates-Full Manual Mode."
      --
      "The more kinks you put in the plumbing, the easier it is to stop up the pipes!" -Scotty

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #243468 Reply

        anonymous

        MS’s CEO Satya Nadella is not as generous as eX-Past CEO Bill Gates. So, Win 7 EOL in Jan 2020 will likely not be extended unless there is a mass exodus by the enterprises/companies to Linux or MacOS in Jan 2020.

        • #243519 Reply

          Ascaris
          AskWoody_MVP

          The extension of Windows XP support happened during the Ballmer era.

          I think it’s a safe bet that support is not going to be extended for consumer versions of 7 in any way, no matter how many still use it.  They’ve already shown they are willing to deliberately expose their customers to malware (by denying Windows 7 updates on hardware they’ve declared is the sole property of Windows 10) in order to force them to upgrade.  They haven’t gotten any more accommodating since then.

          Group "L" (KDE Neon Linux, based on Ubuntu 18.04)

          6 users thanked author for this post.
      • #243529 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Lounger

        Nibbled To Death: I did love, and still do, the ill-fated “Firefly” science fiction series that run for one season before “the suits” at Fox canceled it because of “too expensive, let’s stick with reality shows: they are cheap and get better ratings.” So I joined the campaign to make Fox reconsider. If you are also a fan, you know how well that went.

        https://www.syfy.com/syfywire/former_fox_president_explains_why_firefly_had_to_be_canceled

        I doubt that Nadella and Co. will go back on their vehemently stated goal to have Windows 10 be “the last Windows ever”. Keeping a legacy version going because many users still prefer it to Windows 10 would be considered a serious loss of face, and a potential loss of million-dollar annual bonuses and several other little perks like that. I suspect that, no matter how unlikely, that would be a worry they won’t want to entertain.

        • This reply was modified 2 weeks ago by
           OscarCP.
      • #243533 Reply

        anonymous

        It won’t matter much anyways. People will just continue to use the version of Windows they have until their machine fails. In my day to day life I still see Windows XP machines being run. There’s local small businesses still running it. It does worry me since they can be hacked, but most people don’t care about upgrading. I guarantee you the first major 7 exploit, there will be patches pushed out. XP got patches in 2017 after one of the shadow broker exploits after all.

        I don’t have a family motto, but I am particularly found of “El Psy kongroo”.

        • #243833 Reply

          anonymous

          Hi Okabe Rintaro.

          The number of discovered CVEs for W10 has just passed Windows Vista & XP.

          -lehnerus2000

          1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #243428 Reply

      anonymous

      On a dual boot machine with Win7, I use Linux Mint 19.1 Tessa Cinnamon.   All apps work seamlessly including TaxAct.  I maintain two Win7 distros on Group B.  I install patches immediately.  Never an issue so far.

    • #243441 Reply

      anonymous

      Interestingly enough, my old IT Guru said, “Just because they’re not supporting XP doesn’t mean you can’t use it, even to go on the Web…just shift to some good, free AV ware, don’t visit questionable sites, use Malwarebytes, and keep good backups.  Practice good PC sanitation.  Don’t jump when the elephant in Redmond stamps it’s foot! The users have the power, not Redmond.”

      And you know, I was able to use XP on both sides of the firewall until AV outfits and many others no longer supported it. The machine I built for it is still going, doing some really complex things, albeit offline. it’s been as stable as a table.

      I might not recommend this for non-techies and tyros, but if you have any PC savvy, you can do it.”

      5 users thanked author for this post.
    • #243500 Reply

      BobT
      AskWoody Lounger

      Don’t give a toss. I’m going to keep using 7.

      If I absolutely HAVE to switch, it will be to 8.1, since I use Classic Start Menu anyway.

      If that is still a problem, I’ll have to give Linux a try.

      One thing’s for sure, I am NOT going to use Win10 unless MS backs off and makes something that isn’t 10. It has nothing I want, and a LOT of stuff I don’t want..

      8 users thanked author for this post.
      • #243514 Reply

        anonymous

        @BobT , I admire your resolve and agree with your conclusions. You already have defined your desires and fallback positions. The timeline has been known for quite a while now. I encourage you to start moving on this transition soon, like February rather than October. Having the whole summer in front of you will be a buffer against the stress of a forced move later. Having more time available when a setback occurs can prevent bad decisions and costly equipment purchases.

        Good luck, and see you on the other side.

        3 users thanked author for this post.
        • #243560 Reply

          lurks about
          AskWoody Lounger

          Good advice to anyone considering an alternate OS, start working on the transition now so you know what adjustments you will need to make.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #243674 Reply

          BobT
          AskWoody Lounger

          Cheers for the advice but despite all the tech blog hysteria, this ain’t win2k remember, it’s not like my PC is just going to pack up and stop working on Jan 2020…

          I update nearly a month behind nowadays already (manually, when most of the issues are known), so that isn’t a gargantuan issue either.

          I keep my PC secure enough that I’m not fretting. If I do sense it will become a problem then sure I’ll start the transition earlier, but my good old Win 7 will still be here and working, till ‘I’ decide to upgrade. And that’s the beauty of it, the responsibility and control all lies with me. Another thing I don’t like about 10..

          3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #243515 Reply

      banzaigtv
      AskWoody Lounger

      Happily running Windows 8.1 on my machine. I dropped Windows 10 after all of those shady practices by M$. I’m going to keep running Windows 8.1 until 2023, then either switch to Linux or retire the PC and get a Macbook or Chromebook. So far I have customized it with AeroGlass 8, TileIconifier, and Linkbar. I actually find the Start screen useful for pinning shortcuts to programs, but I partially disabled the charms bar, making it difficult to launch. As for Windows 7, I’d love to mod Windows 8.1 to make it look and sound exactly like it while keeping the Start screen (Shift+Windows Key to launch it), but it’s a tedious process and carries risks of the mods being broken by updates.

      i7-4790k, HyperX FURY 16 GB RAM, Galax GTX 980 HoF, Samsung 850 EVO 1 TB SSD, Windows 8.1 Pro 64-bit

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #243539 Reply

      CADesertRat
      AskWoody Plus

      Report: Windows 10 Takes Over Windows 7                                                                             https://www.thurrott.com/windows/windows-10/196570/report-windows-10-takes-over-windows-7

       

      • This reply was modified 2 weeks ago by
         CADesertRat.
      1 user thanked author for this post.
      b
      • #243578 Reply

        anonymous

        In the bigger picture, Windows world netmarketshare has again dropped from 87.03% in Nov 2018 to 86.20% in Dec 2018.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #243619 Reply

        wdburt1
        AskWoody Plus

        The linked article is pegged to one statistical comparison, which may fluctuate in the months ahead.

        The rest of it is marked by sloppy word choices and sloppy thinking:

        “Taken over” instead of “overtaken.”

        “Growingly” (a made up word) instead of “increasingly.”

        Then–

        “The company has a huge year ahead of itself — with one big Windows 10 update expected in the first half of the year, and another in the second.”

        What about this makes it a “huge” year?

        And this–

        “Microsoft has focused on creativity and productivity in Windows 10 for the past feature updates, and the company’s focus will likely continue to be on productivity this year.”

        Really?  What’s basis does he offer for the claim about the recent past, or the claim about the future?

        It’s just fluff.

         

        • This reply was modified 2 weeks ago by
           wdburt1.
    • #243543 Reply

      anonymous

      Bad move from a business software perspective as for enterprise/volume licensing customers Microsoft is offering paid extended windows 7 support until 2023! There are still plenty of business customers that have their mission critical software only certified for Windows 7 and the cost of re-certification is way more costly than simply purchasing an extended windows 7 support contract. There where loads of XP shops that did not convert over right away to windows 7 either mainly for the very same reason in the form of the expenses related to the costs of certifying mission critical business software on any new OS.

      Folks the cost of  a copy of a new OS/license does not usually represent the reason most businesses put off converting to the latest new and shiny OS. It’s the cost of certifying that enterprise’s mission critical software to work under any new OS that keeps most businesses not wanting to move to the latest OS. That was true for windows XP and doubly true for windows 7. Windows 10 is not the most stable of OSs what with the release cadence undertaken by MS starting with windows 10.

      I suspect that because of windows 8.1 being very similar under the hood to windows 7 that it’s rather easy for MS to offer the extended paid windows 7 support until 2023 anyways and most businesses that took their time converting to 7 will still want to properly amortize their windows 7 conversion costs before they undertake any expensive mission critical software re-certification for windows 10. Even for windows 7 enterprise licensees that have in the past 5 – 7 years just converted from windows XP to windows 7, those businesses would rather get their money’s worth out of that steep expense of re-certifying mission critical software for any new OS.

      If I where any business I’d expect that any software provider would not try any force the matter or they may just risk losing some software sales.

      These Third Party software suppliers better think twice about dropping support for Windows 7 or even 8.1 because most businesses will not look kindly at being forced to go through any expensive mission critical software re-certification process that costs many many times the cost of any OS license.  Microsoft is sure one not to upset their enterprise/business customers and these third party software producers better re-think that forcing of any potential business clients!

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #243558 Reply

      James Bond 007
      AskWoody Lounger

      I don’t care either. I will continue to use Windows 7 and 8.1 (8.1 with Classic Shell using the classic menu). If any of these third party software companies want to drop support for 7 and 8.1 and force their customers to 10 as early as now, they will lose my business.

      I am preparing for a switch to 8.1 once the support for 7 ends. It is pretty easy for me to do since I have installed 8.1 on each of my Windows computers alongside 7, so it will be a simple matter of designating the Windows 8.1 partition as the default OS to run. But I will keep a copy of Windows 7 on each of these computers to run older softwares I still want.

      One thing to worry about using Windows 8.1 is that the hardware companies like Nvidia / AMD / Intel have dropped support for 8.1 already in their latest hardware. So you will have to keep using older hardware to run 8.1. For example the new Nvidia RTX graphics cards and the AMD RX and Vega cards are no longer supported in Windows 8.1 since Nvidia and AMD do not provide drivers for 8.1 (but there are Windows 7 drivers still).

      Hope for the best. Prepare for the worst.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #243575 Reply

        Ascaris
        AskWoody_MVP

        One thing to worry about using Windows 8.1 is that the hardware companies like Nvidia / AMD / Intel have dropped support for 8.1 already in their latest hardware. So you will have to keep using older hardware to run 8.1. For example the new Nvidia RTX graphics cards and the AMD RX and Vega cards are no longer supported in Windows 8.1 since Nvidia and AMD do not provide drivers for 8.1 (but there are Windows 7 drivers still).

        It might be possible to make your own Windows 8.1 drivers from the Windows 10 drivers.  I’ve done this kind of thing for a laptop whose hardware ID (through mix and match of components) was one that never exists in “nature,” and so the Windows nVidia drivers won’t recognize the card.  The Linux proprietary drivers (from nVidia) recognize it and work fine, but not the Windows ones.

        I also have done this with Intel drivers for the integrated GPU on a Kaby Lake CPU.  Intel offered no Windows 8.1 driver for Kaby, but after editing the .inf file, it installed and worked flawlessly (after I rebooted and selected the option to suspend driver signature enforcement.  You only need to do it when installing the driver; after that, it stays in there.  Doing this, of course, is unsupported (in the real meaning of the word, not the MS “you’d better not” one), but it has a good chance of working, I’d say.  This isn’t the ideal place to post the details on how to do it, but I thought I would mention at least that it is possible in some cases.  It’s still a pain not knowing if it will work until you’ve actually got the card in hand!

         

        Group "L" (KDE Neon Linux, based on Ubuntu 18.04)

        • #243613 Reply

          mn–
          AskWoody Lounger

          Well, that and the Linux drivers tend to cover all models where the Windows drivers are hardware-specific. No separate drivers for Quadro and GeForce on Linux. So the Linux driver probably doesn’t even check that it’s an existing board as long as the GPU chip itself is nVidia…?

          That probably has some …interesting… worst-case failure modes, with things like clock range recognition…

          Also really like the point that nVidia supports the same GPU hardware on Linux for some years longer than on Windows, usually.

          So, if you *really* need it… virtualize it on Linux, using QEMU/KVM with QXL guest graphics drivers, pass graphics as OpenGL to the host GPU? (Does funny things for TeamViewer or MspAnywhere remoting into the VM, though.)

    • #243564 Reply

      anonymous

      It has been described that Susan Bradley’s Patch Lady posts target a corporate environment. With a name like Commerce Clearing House, this vendor does not target personal income tax filers among its clientele. Today starts 2019Q1 taxable activity.

      I believe the “heads up” nature of this advance notice came at an appropriate time to alert clients that the deadline for tax records on the entire tax year that started today will fall some months after Windows 7 officially scheduled End of Life. This will be a surprise only to those who do not habitually think of Operating Systems and tax obligations at the same time. (Most of us) Microsoft scheduled their event some years ago, and tax day in the US has been mid-April since 1955. Planning ahead is good business practice.

      Thank you, Susan, for connecting the dots and putting out the word.

       

      Edited for content.

    • #243576 Reply

      Nibbled To Death By Ducks
      AskWoody Lounger

      I doubt that Nadella and Co. will go back on their vehemently stated goal to have Windows 10 be “the last Windows ever”

      OscarCP, resistance is never useless, even if you fail. The only thing useless is rolling over and not trying. And CEO’s come and go, as do policies. We shall see. Nadella’s taking a lot of flak lately.

      (And, yes, I did and still do admire the Firefly series-excellent scripts, due to he fact that the writers had “a good ear”; in other words, the knew the answer to the question, “Do people really talk like this?” Truly a shame they  cancelled this in favor of “Dog The Bounty Hunter” and the like; the basest form of ingratiation with The Great Unwashed, who, it must be said, have their story to tell as well;  but this great piece of work should never have pulled down and replaced with a pinball machine, metaphorically speaking. And BTW, I’m sure you know a movie “Serenity” was made, and won several awards after its release. Resistance is never useless.)

      As for me and Win 7,  to quote the old maxim, “Go and return with your shield, or on it.”

      But then, it wouldn’t be the first time if I came back lying on my shield. 🙂

      A good and happy year to all! 🙂

      Win7 Pro SP1 64-bit, Dell Latitude E6330, Intel CORE i5 "Ivy Bridge", Group "A/B [negative] :)", Multiple Air-Gapped backup drives in different locations, "Don't check for updates-Full Manual Mode."
      --
      "The more kinks you put in the plumbing, the easier it is to stop up the pipes!" -Scotty

    • #244875 Reply

      MrJimPhelps
      AskWoody Plus

      I run Linux Mint as my primary OS. And I run Windows 8.1 in a virtual machine. The Windows 8.1 VM is there in case I need it, for situations just like this.

      The tax software companies have no choice about this. In one year Windows 7 will go out of support – no more security updates from Microsoft. Well, guess what — in one year you will use the 2019 tax prep software. In other words, in the view of the tax prep company, it won’t be safe to use Windows 7 when doing your 2019 taxes with their software.

      If they claim that their 2019 software will work with Windows 7, they will be opening themselves to all sorts of liability. If anyone has any problems related to filing their taxes, and they used this software with Windows 7, a lot of those people will sue for damages. For this reason, they have no choice but to announce to everyone that the 2019 software won’t work with Windows 7.

      Group "L" (Linux Mint)
      with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #244884 Reply

        anonymous

        And the notice is related to activity happening today. We have begun the second week of receipts for the 2019 Tax Year. These are the records that will eventually be summarized in the final tax forms due three months after Win7 EoL. I would feel reassured if all vendors reacted to future events in such a proactive manner.

        Stumbling over mistakes that were not admitted, after they happen, is for Operating Systems. Accountants adhere to a higher standard.

    Please follow the -Lounge Rules- no personal attacks, no swearing, and politics/religion are relegated to the Rants forum.

    Reply To: Patch Lady – vendors start to shut the doors on Windows 7

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