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Monthly Archives: August 2019

  • The second August patch for Win10 1903 shoots one core up to 100% utilization

    Posted on August 31st, 2019 at 00:12 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Is your machine red-lining after installing today’s KB 4512941, the second August cumulative update for Win10 version 1903?

    Günter Born has a workaround.

    The problem is caused by a corrupt cache in

    c:\Windows\SystemApps\Microsoft.Windows.Cortana_cw5n1h2txyewy\cache\
    

    The solution is to replace that folder with an old, correctly functioning version. Born has links.

    There’s a reason why I haven’t flipped over to MS-DEFCON 3 or 4 just yet. This patch, in particular, hasn’t been sufficiently tested.

  • Patch Alert: Where we stand with the August 2019 patches

    Posted on August 30th, 2019 at 11:45 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Overview in Computerworld Woody on Windows.

    Wouldn’t ya know it… Microsoft just released the second August patch for Win10 version 1903. Look at all of those fixes.

  • Apple to enhance Siri privacy protection

    Posted on August 29th, 2019 at 16:05 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    From Nathaniel Parker:

    Apple has recently made a statement concerning a series of privacy enhancements to Siri as a followup to Apple’s halting of employees listening to Siri requests as part of their “grading” program

    After briefly mentioning how Siri protects customer privacy in its current iteration and a brief description of how Siri’s “grading” program works, Apple issued an apology for how it has not fully communicated the current “grading” program, has reiterated that the current program is now halted, and has also announced that the program will be resumed in the fall after a software update (likely in iOS 13 and the other major Apple operating system updates that utilize Siri).

    When the “grading” program resumes in the fall, the following changes will be made, according to Apple’s statement:

    • First, Apple will no longer retain audio recordings to help improve Siri. Apple will, however, continue to use computer-generated transcripts to help improve Siri.
    • Second, Apple will allow customers to opt-in to help improve Siri by learning from their audio samples. Those who choose to opt-in can also choose to opt-out anytime, and Apple will apply strong privacy controls to this collected data.
    • Third, when customers do opt-in to help improve Siri by learning from their audio samples, only Apple employees (not third-party contractors) will be able to listen to the audio samples. Apple employees will also work to delete audio samples which are determined to inadvertently trigger Siri.

    Two points Apple did not specifically include in the statement are:

    • Whether customers can choose to opt-in or opt-out of allowing Apple to use computer-generated transcripts to help improve Siri. From the reports I have read on other Apple and tech news sites, it sounds as though Apple will continue to use computer-generated transcripts to help improve Siri, without the ability for customer’s to opt-out (although the data should be randomized as to not tie it to a user’s personal information according to Apple’s current iteration of Siri’s privacy protections).
    • Whether customers will need to upgrade to iOS 13 (or the other major Apple operating system updates that utilize Siri) to take advantage of the new “grading” program opt-in. I am concerned especially for those on older Apple hardware that cannot upgrade to the latest operating system updates and wonder if Apple would possibly address such concerns in minor updates to older Apple operating system releases.

    In general, I trust Apple’s privacy stance with Siri more than I do Apple’s competitors.

    With Apple’s competitors such as Amazon (Alexa), all of my Alexa recordings are stored in Amazon’s servers and tied to my Amazon account (although I can delete any of my recordings anytime).

    It is good, however, that Apple is addressing concerns with and is being forthcoming with the current Siri “grading” program and making the necessary adjustments this fall. I hope Apple will clarify the other two points above, and I look forward to seeing how Apple fully rolls out the new privacy enhancements this fall.

    I respect Apple for working hard to keep privacy at the forefront of the customer experience, and it another reason I enjoy using Apple’s products and services.

  • Why I won’t buy a new Surface Pro: Battery problems and support

    Posted on August 29th, 2019 at 06:50 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    With new Surface Pro(s) and Surface Laptop(s) likely coming soon, a friend has asked me if she should plan on buying a new one.

    My answer? A resounding no.

    Yes, I know that thousands (millions?) of people are very happy with their Surfaces. But many are not. The biggest complaints I hear are about the batteries and TypeCovers.

    According to Barb Bowman, Surface Pro 5 and 6 and Surface Laptop 2 batteries are going down the tubes. If you’re using Win10, open the Feedback Hub and type “battery drain.” You’ll see what she means:

    It isn’t just the bad batteries or dead Type Covers. The over-arching problem: The way Microsoft is handling the problem.

    In short, they aren’t.

    Complaints on the Microsoft Answers Forum go unanswered. Complaints on the Feedback Hub go unanswered. Complaints from key players – MVP Barb included – go unanswered.

    Every hardware manufacturer has battery problems. Keyboard problems, too. Most of them at least take a swing at customer support. From Microsoft these days, it’s just crickets.

    That’s no way to run a support organization. And that, more than anything else, is the reason I won’t buy — and won’t recommend — a Surface Pro or Surface Laptop, of any version.

  • Patch Lady – Avast does…what?

    Posted on August 29th, 2019 at 05:05 Susan Bradley Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Spying on HTTPS

    Spotted that post.  Read it.  Now why this appears to be the RIGHT way for the vendor do to this inspection process, it still makes me shudder.  As is pointed out in the post, all it takes for a vulnerability to be introduced into the implementation or some other extension or add in that is nefarious to slither in and get this information and there’s your encrypted info out the door.

    While antivirus can be great as Symantec showcased lately it can also be our worst enemy.

  • Patch Lady – what’s this thing called Teams

    Posted on August 28th, 2019 at 13:56 Susan Bradley Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    If you have Office 365 pro plus you are in the group that Microsoft is your deployment admin.  And your deployment admin (Microsoft) pushed out Teams in the July release.

    If you now have clients/customers/…. uh you… asking how to turn the automatic log on … OFF… read on

    https://office365itpros.com/2019/08/27/stopping-teams-starting-automatically-windows/

    If you want to know what teams is all about… think of it as a client for SharePoint the sharing site, or Facebook for business.  Bottom line it’s a collaborative tool to help communication inside teams.  It is replacing Skype for Business.

     

  • More than two weeks later, still no VB/VBA/VBScript fix for Win10 version 1903

    Posted on August 28th, 2019 at 12:51 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Fixing bugs introduced by Windows security patches be like:

    Oh, if Microsoft only worked that well. RIP SRV.

  • Microsoft removes the update block for August Win7 patches on Symantec/Norton systems

    Posted on August 28th, 2019 at 07:18 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Symantec advises that it and Microsoft have come to an agreement about Symantec and Norton antivirus problems with the August Win7 and Server 2008 R2 patches. As a result, MS relaxed its weeks-long block on installing the August Monthly Rollup and Security-only patches on systems running Symantec and Norton antivirus products.

    Details in Computerworld Woody on Windows.

    Thx, @RDRGuy