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Daily Archives: August 22, 2019

  • Microsoft re-issues the Win7 VB/VBA/VBScript fixing patch KB 4517297

    Posted on August 22nd, 2019 at 09:56 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Bear with me here….

    Microsoft screwed up all of the Windows patches this month, clobbering VisualBasic, VBA and VBScript. You know that.

    It has slowly been releasing Silver Bullet patches — largely single-purpose patches — to fix the error of its ways.

    But there have been problems with the Win7 patch, in particular, KB 4517297. People report that they can’t get it to install, or that it doesn’t fix the problem. Günter Born has details.

    Yesterday, MS released a new version of KB 4517297. The title of the KB article, Update for Windows 7 SP1 and Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1: August 16, 2019, hasn’t changed. Nor has the content of the KB article, as best I can tell — except for a note at the bottom that the article was updated on August 21.

    What’s different? Does it fix the reported problems with the original KB 4517297? Or is it just a metadata change, to fix installation problems?

    UPDATE: Looks like a metadata change.

    Confirming that all of the files inside the download are dated 8/15. That’s not definitive, but it’s highly indicative of metadata changes.

    Thx @PhantomOfMobile, @etguenni, @SBSDiva

  • Chromebook expiration dates

    Posted on August 22nd, 2019 at 06:52 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Just read an article by Tim Anderson in The Reg that explains how to find your Chromebook’s “Auto Update Expiration” date.

    every Chromebook has an “Auto Update Expiration (AUE) Date” after which the operating system is unsupported by Google.

    That’s a concept every Windows user should understand – but the big difference is that Google sets the expiration date before the machine is put on sale. Microsoft arbitrarily decides when a specific chip goes out of support – and the decision is made way after initial release.

    I’ve seen ads for Chromebooks lately that include the AUE expiration date. But if you don’t know your Chromebook’s expiration date, it’s easy to look up. Google has a readily accessible list of machines and their expiration dates.

    If you can’t match up your Chromebook’s specific model name with an expiration date on the list, there’s an additional trick in The Reg article that shows you how to query the OS to get the correct model name. For most people, though, simply knowing which machine you have is enough to get you a definitive answer on when support ends.

    Per Anderson:

    You can continue to use your Chromebook after the AUE but the OS will be frozen in time and Google’s warnings above will apply. The device will show a notification along the lines of: “This device will no longer receive the latest software updates. Please consider upgrading.” … Security is an issue, though a Chromebook is one of the more secure devices out there thanks to the sandboxing of applications and other techniques, so it is less serious than it would be for, say, a Windows PC.

    My all-time favorite Chromebook fell off the AUE turnip truck more than a year ago. It’s still humming along, getting daily workouts both from me and my nine-year-old.

    Thx, @Kirsty

  • Report: The new .NET updates break Veritas Backup Exec

    Posted on August 22nd, 2019 at 06:24 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Two days ago, Microsoft released a bunch of patches for .NET Framework 3.5, 4.7.2 and 4.8.

    Now comes word from Günter Born that they’re breaking Veritas Backup Exec.

    The updates (per deskmodder.de):

    They all claim to fix the bug “Addresses a crash that occurs after enumerating event logs in Bass Class Library (BCL).”

    Born has a translation of a German blog post that says after installing the .NET 4.8 patches, Veritas BackupExec 20.4 won’t start. Apparently, rolling back the patch brings Backup Exec back to life.

    Have you had any problems with the .NET patches?