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  • AskWoody Plus Newsletter 16.1.0 Woody’s Windows Watch: Would you pay to rent Windows?

    Posted on January 14th, 2019 at 08:18 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Before you jump in with a knee-jerk reaction, realize that there are some compelling arguments.

    What do you think?

    If that helped, take a second to support AskWoody on Patreon

    Home Forums AskWoody Plus Newsletter 16.1.0 Woody’s Windows Watch: Would you pay to rent Windows?

    This topic contains 43 replies, has 31 voices, and was last updated by

     rfinney 11 hours, 2 minutes ago.

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    • #310058 Reply

      woody
      AskWoody Plus

      Before you jump in with a knee-jerk reaction, realize that there are some compelling arguments. What do you think?
      [See the full post at: AskWoody Plus Newsletter 16.1.0 Woody’s Windows Watch: Would you pay to rent Windows?]

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #310091 Reply

      anonymous

      I’d be willing to pay if your site provides useful information for me.

      • #310093 Reply

        PKCano
        AskWoody Plus

        The first issue of the Newsletter has just been published. For of the sections are available topics on the main blog page. The button “Newsletter/Alerts” in the top bar may be accessible at this time to everyone to view the Newsletter in its entirety. Eventually it will be a AskWoody Plus perk/exclusive. (Or use the “over here.” link)

        3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #310154 Reply

      Canadian Tech
      AskWoody MVP

      No chance what so ever. It is like asking me to pay rent on a house I bought 5 years ago.

      CT

      10 users thanked author for this post.
      • #310162 Reply

        Microfix
        AskWoody MVP

        Home-use: It’s like implementing PPP..(Pay Per Patch) given the high quality patches of the last few years, they can do one!
        Small Business: the clock is ticking..
        Enterprise: no affect whatsoever

        | W10 Pro x64 | W8.1 Pro x64 | Linux x64 Hybrids | XP Pro O/L
        2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #310163 Reply

      NetDef
      AskWoody Plus

      I and many of my SMB clients would be willing to pay IF:

      We could avoid Open License.

      The Microsoft 365 edition would include all the management features of Enterprise Editions.

      No minimum seats per site.

      Advanced CPU core count and ReFS (Workstation edition?)

      Advanced Windows Update management.

      Cloud/Azure VM and Desktop rights.

      Direct Access/Access anywhere feature set (aka Essentials).

      We would get the rights to use “golden masters” (currently also an ENT perk.)

      And it included the advanced Defender features announced last year.

      And finally, packaged at a discount with Office 365 . . .

       

      ~ Group "Weekend" ~

      • This reply was modified 4 days, 17 hours ago by
         NetDef.
      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #310190 Reply

        NetDef
        AskWoody Plus

        Perhaps a better way to express what I would expect from Windows/Microsoft 356:

        If you add a fourth column to their comparison chart, representing the “rental” product . . .  every single row would contain a check mark relative to the “legacy product versions” (Workstation, Pro and ENT.)  It might also have new rows that detail USEFUL new features that only the “rental” edition would provide – aka Office 365 versus Office 2019.

        https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/windowsforbusiness/compare

         

        ~ Group "Weekend" ~

    • #310195 Reply

      Seff
      AskWoody Plus

      I’d pay a reasonable monthly fee to rent a fully supported Windows 7 from next year on, provided they fixed the reliability issues where patching is concerned. In other words, I’d subscribe to a sensibly priced maintenance package aimed at home users with one or two machines as a means of keeping Windows 7 support viable beyond January 2020.

      For me to “upgrade” to a new version of Windows that was entirely based on monthly payments I would need convincing that it was a genuine “upgrade” worth paying for (which Windows 10 is not at present) and that there would still be a way of accessing and using my computers in the event of my ceasing those payments for whatever reason, be it unreliability on MS’s part or financial circumstances on mine etc. I would also need convincing that paying a rental/subscription wasn’t simply a way to obtain all the basic fundamentals that ought to be in the base version to start with! If it offered something extra that I wanted, then I’d happily pay for it.

      • This reply was modified 4 days, 17 hours ago by
         Seff.
      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #310202 Reply

      cptomes
      AskWoody Lounger

      No.

       

      That would be like leasing a Yugo.

      Hey look! Another Feature Update!

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #310243 Reply

      zero2dash
      AskWoody Lounger

      As it currently is – no. I would not pay a rental fee on what we currently have as Microsoft Windows.

      If I was given more control and ability to strip out the cruft of Win10 by renting it – possibly, depending on price.

    • #310274 Reply

      anonymous

      I would consider paying under the following circumstances:

      1) Microsoft ends ANY and ALL telemetry not required for troubleshooting purposes, and ends the sale of any of this data to third parties for paying subscribers. No ifs, ands, or buts.

      2) Microsoft allows me patch control over the operating system. No forcing.

      3) Microsoft removes any advertising bits from the operating system attempting to get me to use Edge, or some product (e.g., MineCraft, XBox, etc.).  In its stead, they could have some form of newsletter, or opt-in subscription to their offerings.

      4) I receive actual quality support for the Windows product from people who are of higher quality than Microsoft AnswerDesk Level I or answers.microsoft.com, both of which provide inferior support (likely because Microsoft either doesn’t pay well, or doesn’t train well).

      6 users thanked author for this post.
    • #310398 Reply

      HappyElderNerd
      AskWoody Plus

      If and when Microsoft actually CARES about the reliability of their product on a class of computer that they SPECIFY, so hardware providers can comply, I’d consider it.  But, Microsoft’s own practices undermine our confidence in their products so thoroughly, it’s unreasonable to expect they’ll suddenly have a change of heart and actually CARE about the customers’ experience.  Their attitude is simply, “Hey, we have your money, what else do you expect from us???”

      “Updates” are a public admission of a failure of robust design and implementation.

      Give us a product that is stable, and can grow with new hardware as it emerges.  Design and implement it with good, robust programming practices, expose the ARCHITECTURE to anyone who wants to understand HOW its’ supposed to function, with the goal of not REQUIRING arcane bug fixes to overcome original programming errors, only offer performance/feature upgrades, instead of monthly bug fixes (that, in themselves, are usually bug-laden), and I’d consider “renting” the product.

      How is it that I can buy an automobile today and expect it to work for years, but I can’t buy a Windows that is predictable and reliable for more than a month or so, and which then must have frequent “maintenance” updates to keep it functional?  It’s because there is an insufficiently robust design methodology behind all Microsoft software products.

      Fix that overwhelming suite of bad practices, prove to me the product is reliable for my needs for at least a few years at a time, and I’d consider “renting” the product.  Until then, we’re stuck in the dark ages of computing, with bugs and fixes required for an inadequately designed, implemented and tested product.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #310404 Reply

      Bluetrix
      AskWoody Plus

      I think I would finally make the move to Linux as my full time OS before paying rent. My Windows OS computer usage gets less and less enjoyable as I grow older. M$ will outlive me for sure.
      A new Windows ad might start off: “For less than 10 cents a day you can drive …”

      (snip long winded reply)

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #310423 Reply

      lurks about
      AskWoody Lounger

      No, I do not think MS is really going to change how they treat customers. So it would throwing good money after bad.

      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #310443 Reply

      anonymous

      Answering as a consumer: Considering the general cost scale for Cloud-based software (paying full price over the course of 12 months): No.  I already pay for Pro licenses.  Most of them are Win8.  I bought mine for $50 for 5 PCs when they were on special, imagine if I had to pay 5x$200 every. Single. Year.  That’s a cost of $250 dollars vs 5x200x6, or over $6,000.

      No.  Just no.

      6 users thanked author for this post.
    • #310446 Reply

      BobbyB
      AskWoody Lounger

      What another Monthly bill? Do you think I am nuts Mr Nadella?
      110% reliability, decent quality patching, the ability to remove useless “fluff” easily without resorting to Power Shell, Xbox and the like that I never have, or will use, a “Cast Iron” Guarantee that there’s no more “Snooping”, no more Ads, handing back complete control to me or as to near complete as it was of yore.
      Oh and don’t forget to throw a decent copy of Office in there, not that C2R/Office2019/365 Nonsense something where I can control the patches say Office 2016 is decent enough, i’ll settle for that.
      Then maybe we will talk, I dunno $5 a month? you can bundle it with the Cable/Internet and Phone that fluctuates Month to Month so I probably wont notice too much 😉

      • This reply was modified 4 days, 14 hours ago by
         BobbyB.
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    • #310448 Reply

      Christopher Harrison
      AskWoody Plus

      Depends on the price and also agree with others that eliminating MS “suggestions” to use Edge and similar advert popups would be essential.

    • #310523 Reply

      ScotchJohn
      AskWoody Plus

      I’m far from being a fan of subscription ware, and have taken care to avoid them as possible.

      My Quicken is version 2002 Deluxe, and has not yet taken to refusing to run.  xplorer2 x64 is a lifetime licence, as is Malwarebytes, when they still sold it.  I take WinZip on some long-term licence that seems to give me updates but not upgrades.  I have declined Revo’s invitation to move to their version 4 subscription model.  RoboForm had such a good five-year offer that I went for it.

      Bottom line is that I won’t go for subscription-ware routinely, but I would for software that I like to use.  Otherwise, I don’t mind being years/decades out-of-date if it works, or I don’t need to connect to the internet with attendant dangers.

    • #310555 Reply

      anonymous

      Previous paid Windows was fixed price. For this you leased the OS and received a set period  of support.

      Subscription Windows you still don’t own your copy of Windows but pay a monthly fee  instead of a fixed cost. The cynics might say its nothing more than a marketing trick to increase the overall price and make it easier to raise the price for the already hooked fish (errr, ‘users’).

    • #310611 Reply

      Steve S.
      AskWoody Plus

      Having Windows as a subscription service may be of value to some, though I’d definitely prefer a one-time price that includes a known “service” period.

      I dislike the move toward “rentier capitalism” that’s enamored businesses over the last 10 or 15 years. (Just one example: the push for ever-lengthening copyrights so profits can continue to be extracted for longer periods of time.)

      There are monthly bills that I don’t take issue with, though: water, electricity, phone, internet access and so on. These are clearly services or metered resources. But to me, an OS should be more like a one-time product with a given support period —  a clearly defined, time-limited thing. Similar to buying a car with a 5 year 50K mile bumper-to-bumper warrantee. After the support/warrantee period, the dimes on me. But at least it’s my choice.

      From Wikipedia: “Current usage of the term ‘rentier capitalism’ describes the gaining of ‘rentier’ income from ownership or control of assets rather than from capital or labour used for production in a ‘free’ competitive market.”

      Win 7 Pro x64 (Group B), Win 10 1709 (defered upgrades), Linux Mint (dual boots on all)

      5 users thanked author for this post.
    • #310634 Reply

      BobT
      AskWoody Lounger

      As a business? Sure.

      As a home user? Lol. Get out.

      If I rented it MS could turn round in a year or two and change it beyond recognition, or simply switch it off, they have my **** in their hands.

      When I own something, I have control. It still works years later and it’s up to me what I do with it. Unless on W10 of course..

      6 users thanked author for this post.
    • #310638 Reply

      cesmart4125
      AskWoody Plus

      Woody, in the past I’ve read the excellent articles by you, Susan Bradley, Tracy Capen, and Fred Langa.  These articles contained helpful information for me as a computer user, and I’m willing to pay for your new newsletter.

      As a writer myself, I understand you have to be paid for your work.  You’ve got to put food on the table like the rest of us.

      You may want to let us know about what you think it will cost to produce the news letter each month or what you consider a reasonable contribution to be.  (Since I hate to owe money every month, I probably will pay you twice a year.)

      Hopefully my suggestions will be of assistance to you and your colleagues.  Best wishes in what I see as an exciting new venture.

      Charles

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    • #310655 Reply

      fernlady
      AskWoody Lounger

      My answer is no I would not pay a rental fee, and I would like to know how this rental fee is going to paid? We need to give Microsoft our credit card number? I don’t think so!

      Windows 7 Home Premium x64 AMD Group A Realtek PCLe GBE Family Controller

    • #310758 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Lounger

      One problem with setting up recurring payments is that sometimes it can be really hard to stop them when one does not want the service anymore.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #310770 Reply

      Elly
      AskWoody MVP

      I’m sorry, Woody, but what are the compelling arguments for renting Windows?

      I have another perspective. I’m someone that has bounced around from able-bodied employed, disabled employed, and disabled and unable to work, for 20+ years. That wasn’t a straight line of progression… and it played havoc with depleting my savings and periodically pulling my income from me. People who haven’t had to deal with this may assume that there are resources that disabled can access, but in truth, I’ve been without any income for 5-6 months at a time, while ‘resources’ could be approved. I don’t rent anything. If I was renting Windows, I’d be involuntarily on again/off again… and especially when I am unable to work, or leave the house, my computer becomes a life saver, giving me access to a larger, more interactive, and normal world.

      I’m sure that a company that focuses on milking their customers for all they can get simply disregards those of us that can’t achieve a living wage, let alone a comfortable one… yet for many disabled folks, the ability to access the internet, to communicate, learn, interact, and even work on-line, opens up the world, for less money and energy than almost anything else.

      A lot of people are saying they’d be willing to rent if Microsoft offered something of more value… and are willing to look at a computer OS as a glorified cell phone… but for a rather a large number of people, such renting can become a barrier to accessing services any time their income falters. These aren’t lazy, or addicted, or (add other disparaging label here) people who choose this particular path. Maybe Microsoft doesn’t see it this way, but the equivalent of wheel chair access to buildings needs to be present for everyone to access the internet… and it is amazing how much people can accomplish when such barriers to access are overcome or removed… we become able to do so much more…

      There are times I haven’t been able to keep my internet access paid for, but I was still able to use and benefit from my computer… being creative and productive, rather than stewing in my limitations…

      One other objection to renting Windows- Microsoft has broken trust with me, over and over, in trying to force me into W10, forcing telemetry, forcing updates, forcing unwanted apps and advertising, forcing local searches to Bing… using malware tactics to enforce their bullying. While I might purchase a particular product from them, if it met my needs, I do not want to really partner with, or support their tactics. So, no, I won’t be renting Windows from them.

      Win 7 Home, 64 bit, Group B

      11 users thanked author for this post.
      • #310791 Reply

        lurks about
        AskWoody Lounger

        Compelling arguments for whom, MS or the user? For MS is gives a much more even and reliable income stream and more control of what the users have as they will have more freedom to push out ‘upgrades’. For the user, it really depends. I would say for most there is no compelling argument to have an MS subscription but the opposite; there is no real value in the subscription but money out the door. A few will have a compelling reason to opt for the subscription as will add value for them, though I am hard pressed to find one myself.

        As far as the plight of those who are not flush with cash, a subscription makes someone to install Linux a more reasonable option as Linux distros are almost always free to get.

        3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #310777 Reply

      anonymous

      I also wonder what the supposed benefits are. The only benefits I could see would require that which already exists to no longer be offered. Normally you get the OS subsidized by the hardware, free basic support, and free security updates.

      Maybe they could offer more support, but how is that better than just paying for support but still getting the OS?

      I have no interest in an OS that is constantly adding features or changing looks or anything. That shouldn’t happen at the OS level. Just focus on keeping it secure. New hardware just means new drivers. And if I need new features, that’s what non-OS software updates are for. The OS should just be a solid bedrock, not a part of feature creep.

      The only thing I can think of is if people need computers for less upfront, but OSes aren’t expensive enough right now (with subsidies) to need that sort of thing. The hardware is the main cost.

    • #310797 Reply

      anonymous

      I bought this computer like I bought my house. Asking for rent is just getting seriously greedy.

      Microsoft’s love for the subscription model makes me want to vomit. How about if you release quality software and patches that work? I think your customers would appreciate that more than being asked to pay a monthly subscription fee just to use their computer.

      Apple and Google do not make you pay a subscription to use macOS, iOS, Chrome OS, and Android, so why should Microsoft feel the need to be different?

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #310819 Reply

      bbearren
      AskWoody Plus

      Usually when I bring this up, it gets some bad reactions.  Go to All settings > System > About and click on “Read the Microsoft Software License Terms”.  You will see in the fourth paragraph, “By accepting this agreement or using the software, you agree to all of these terms, and consent to the transmission of certain information during activation and during your use of the software as per the privacy statement described in Section 3. If you do not accept and comply with these terms, you may not use the software or its features.”

      Microsoft is not forcing anything on anyone.  We have all agreed to Microsoft’s terms, and “If you do not accept and comply with these terms, you may not use the software or its features.”  In the Overview Part 6.  “Updates. The software periodically checks for system and app updates, and downloads and installs them for you. You may obtain updates only from Microsoft or authorized sources, and Microsoft may need to update your system to provide you with those updates. By accepting this agreement, you agree to receive these types of automatic updates without any additional notice.”

      The simple answer is that if you don’t like Microsoft Windows and the licensing terms to which you have agreed, uninstall it and install some distro of Linux; buy a Mac.  Microsoft’s global revenue in 2018 was $110.36 billion.  Their global desktop market share was 82.88%.  In every significant metric in the last 10 years, they have been on the rise.

      If just about everything they’re doing is not only successful but also growing, they are quite likely to continue in those directions.  Will they go to a subscription model for Windows OS?  Office 365 seems to be working out the way they wanted it to.  They still sell individual installation licenses for Office, but they’re liking that subscription model.

      I don’t foresee Microsoft trying to force every desktop OS into a subscription model, but I certainly wouldn’t rule out an Office 365-type offering in the future.  And as Woody said, it isn’t likely to be a Home version.  I have Office 365, have had no issues whatsoever, and I like the terabyte of cloud storage that goes with it.

      Bottom line, as long as we’re holding the ticket (license), we’re along for the ride.

      Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

      "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow
      "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns

      "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

      • This reply was modified 4 days, 6 hours ago by
         bbearren.
      • #310841 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Lounger

        The simple answer is that if you don’t like Microsoft Windows and the licensing terms to which you have agreed, uninstall it and install some distro of Linux; buy a Mac. 

        Inconvenient for some, OK by me. I already have a Mac, with no complaints. For others it could be Linux. For an old person unfamiliar with what makes their computer tick, living frugally on small Social Security deposits from month to month, well…  they should either pay up or have a teenage computer wizard grandson or granddaughter to help them out, right?

        Bottom line: There is no pat answer to the question of how appropriate is for MS to charge people for getting continuing Windows 7 support past the official EOL. Or, more generally, for having something that was bought once, presumably for good, being changed by the company selling it to an “as a service” deal subject to recurring payments (and MS would not be the only one doing that). It depends on the user’s situation — and what the trade offs may be — is the best one can say, in my opinion.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #310952 Reply

        Cybertooth
        AskWoody Lounger

        Folks who bring up Microsoft’s licensing terms provide the best reason for ditching Windows forthwith and, for that matter, anything made by Microsoft. “Compelling arguments,” indeed…

        Keep reminding everyone!

         

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #310901 Reply

      anonymous

      Since seeing this post there has been a quest to identify a compelling reason for Windows rental and it is not found inside my brain. For the cost of any Windows subscription, such money would be more useful in part towards becoming a real drama major.

    • #310919 Reply

      dhdoyle
      AskWoody Lounger

      Probably not. This whole software rental thing is coming at a bad time in my career. I’m in my 60’s and retirement is relatively close. I can forsee myself and my wife living on a fixed income and I will be compelled to cut monthly expenses that will eat into my limited income. We will do without quite a few things we currently enjoy. Software rental is an easy NO for me, for the same reason that we have bought our vehicles without incurring debt. Monthly payments are a good way to ruin a pleasant retirement with worry.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #310920 Reply

      cesmart4125
      AskWoody Plus

      Since seeing this post there has been a quest to identify a compelling reason for Windows rental and it is not found inside my brain. For the cost of any Windows subscription, such money would be more useful in part towards becoming a real drama major.

      You may have a point, anonymous.  As there’s a lot of drama updating Windows at present, it may be a good idea to put money into “becoming a real drama major.”

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    • #310959 Reply

      rc primak
      AskWoody Plus

      Where all of this may be heading is for many users, very similar to where Google is heading after Chrome OS.

      Both Microsoft and Google are heading toward Cloud Desktop paradigms. Google’s approach so far is app-centric. Microsoft has Azure Cloud Services, which is more all-encompassing. It’s going to be for most of us much like extending Office 365 to cover all of the major OS features, plus the entire Microsoft Store of apps.

      Google will eventually charge subscriptions to those who continue to use whatever their Chromebooks may morph into. And modifying the devices to run Linux will no longer be possible, due to Fuchsia OS no longer using the Linux kernel as its basis. Among other changes which will almost certainly take place.

      Microsoft likely will not tie its Cloud OS to the Surface line of hardware, though they certainly could do that. The devices which would be tied to subscription Cloud Desktop environments would be locked into S Mode or something like it, and running anything offline would provide only very limited features. The idea is to make the local device serve only as the launchpad to get you up into the Cloud, where all your major work is conducted, and all your outputs are stored.

      Because it’s a Cloud platform, everyone will be on the same version, have the same basic features, and users will have no input about updating or security. All logins will be MS Cloud Account logins.

      Desktop, fully paid OS and applications will be offered for a time, as they are now. But not forever. Over time, if you want a local OS with local storage, you’ll need a custom-built PC with enough hardware resources, and a local OS, like many Linux distros will still be. (Ubuntu and Mint, and probably Fedora will likely also become Cloud Desktop environments. I base this upon the close ties between IBM and Fedora, and between Microsoft and Ubuntu, which will only grow closer over time.)

      So would I pay a reasonable fee to remain in the loop about Google and Microsoft and their cloud services? No. I don’t pay for Apple now, because they have a hardware and software price structure which is beyond my idea of reasonable. So I would most likely not find enough value in Windows or Google’s next OS to be willing to pay just to be able to tell folks that I know what they are talking about when they ask about their personal devices and the issues they are having with them. For my own personal use I already have next to nothing which Linux is not doing for me, for which I would pay anyone else to provide those features or that file type compatibility.

      I believe that there will always be local, one-time paid or free to download and use computing environments and applications. Most likely, these will be Linux distros and Free and Open Source Software. The hardware will increasingly be build it yourself, but I already do that with my Intel NUC and any of its successors. There will always be a few of us who prefer the control and privacy of owning our own hardware and storage, and being responsible for our own computing successes and failures.

      Let the others (which means the vast majority of people and businesses) pay the piper for convenience vs. control, and ease of access (you simply plug it in and you’re ready to go) vs. privacy. It isn’t just the monetary outlays which bother me about the current trends with Windows, Google and Apple. It’s the other prices people seem only too willing to pay, without really thinking about the long-term consequences.

      -- rc primak

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         rc primak.
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      • #310973 Reply

        mn–
        AskWoody Lounger

        Computers with local storage and no cloud dependencies won’t be going away completely, there’ll be off-the-shelf models still. Though it’s quite possible that eventually it’ll just be equivalents of the current “power workstation” types and up.

        Because, well, such things as mechanical engineering / analysis, medical imaging / modeling and other such fields do produce large amounts of “temporary” data which is quite unlikely to be cost-effective to transfer to cloud and back every time. Especially as some of the instrumentation is driven by that data in near-realtime. (Sheesh, a “powergaming”-class GPU and extra USB buses for a medical workstation…)

        And that’s not getting into information security. That Dutch GDPR hassle Microsoft has with Office 365 really hasn’t helped…

        Oh well, it’ll be years before a cloud model for just the basic desktop functions would be even theoretically possible for some of our users. It’s a question of connectivity / coverage and will be for some time still.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #310974 Reply

        anonymous

        “The idea is to make the local device serve only as the launchpad to get you up into the Cloud, where all your major work is conducted, and all your outputs are stored.”

        What you just described sounds exactly like mainframe computing to me. We’re going backwards in a sense.

        5 users thanked author for this post.
        • #310991 Reply

          geekdom
          AskWoody Plus

          What you just described sounds exactly like mainframe computing to me. We’re going backwards in a sense.

          And I was never too pleased with mainframe: data loss, no backups, profound delay time share, inaccessible printers, unexplained down time, huge fees.

          Group G{ot backup} Win7 · x64 · SP1 · i3-3220 · TestBeta
          2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #311043 Reply

      bbearren
      AskWoody Plus

      The future is now for Windows 7 Enterprise.

      “As an alternative, Microsoft is offering all three years of ESUs to customers of the new Windows Virtual Desktop (WVD) service at no extra cost. This service offers cloud-hosted virtual machines running Windows 7 plus whatever applications are needed, and those virtual machines will continue to be patched into 2023. WVD uses existing Windows Enterprise E3 licenses, and it runs on the full range of Azure virtual machines, with no additional costs incurred. This includes, for example, GPU-equipped VMs, meaning that WVD should be usable for a wide range of workloads, just as long as running them in the cloud in the first place is acceptable.”

      Microsoft has their foot in that door.  How long before offerings similar to the above become an option for consumer-grade Windows is anyone’s guess, but it seems like a “when”, not an “if”.

      Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

      "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow
      "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns

      "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #311116 Reply

      bosun1
      AskWoody Lounger

      Computers are just a hobby to me. Games, and a great access to information. This box is triple boot Win 7, Win 10, and Linux Mint. The box on top of it is just Mint. With Windows I can just shut off the internet and stay on Linux for surfing while still using my Windows software. Win95, Win98, WinXP, Win7 all purchased, Win 10 “New software for old” scam.
      Rental. HAH! Don’t pay (via automatic CC charge) because of cancelled credit card then you are locked out of your files? I think not. Cloud? Could there be a possibility that someone could hack your data? Is there a possibility that you’ll get wet standing out in the rain?

    • #311199 Reply

      radosuaf
      AskWoody Lounger

      No. Simply no.

      MSI H110 PC MATE * Intel Core i5-6402P * 2 x 8 GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 2133 MHz * Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1050 Ti D5 4G * Samsung 840 EVO 250GB SSD * Western Digital Blue 1TB HDD * Seagate Barracuda 1TB HDD * DVD RW Lite-ON iHAS 124 * Creative X-Fi XtremeGamer PCI * Windows 10 Pro 1803 64-bit
    • #312633 Reply

      Kranium
      AskWoody Lounger

      Would I rent Internet Explorer when there’s free alternative browsers out there?

       

      Same thing.

      Group B - soon to be Group "I give up - Linux it is!"

    • #313047 Reply

      anonymous

      Open source here I come if MS wants a subscription to use Windows. Corporate and Enterprise users will benefit from it most. Not the everyday user. Microsoft should take into account all those “insiders” who most definitely will walk away from the OS in general if this takes place. Developing countries will never come into the market to make a difference either. If MS likes the idea of “geo-fencing” themselves into a smaller market share Kudos to them.

      Cheers

    • #313647 Reply

      rfinney
      AskWoody Plus

      I can’t imagine that any rental version would have the exact feature set that I use & need. There is no one set that can cover all the bases for a large enough base of users. I would naturally still check a rental version out before rejecting it out-of-hand . . I have been known to be wrong on rare occasions 🙂

      rfinney

    Please follow the -Lounge Rules- no personal attacks, no swearing, and politics/religion are relegated to the Rants forum.

    Reply To: AskWoody Plus Newsletter 16.1.0 Woody’s Windows Watch: Would you pay to rent Windows?

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