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  • Microsoft re-re-re…-releases KB 4023057, the “Update to Win10 1507, 1511, 1607, 1703, 1709, and 1803 for update reliability”

    Posted on April 6th, 2019 at 08:18 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    I last talked about it on Nov. 19:

    KB 4023057 has been updated, with a lengthy KB article and very little substance that I can discern.

    This update includes files and resources that address issues that affect the update processes in Windows 10 that may prevent important Windows updates from being installed. These improvements help make sure that updates are installed seamlessly on your device, and they help improve the reliability and security of devices that are running Windows 10.

    We saw it on Sept. 9 and earlier on January 8.

    @ch100 has offered the only explanation that makes sense to me:

    KB4023057 was and still is one of the most weird and unexplained updates in the recent times. This update has never been offered to WSUS, but only to Windows Update. This would indicate that it meant for unmanaged end-users and unmanaged small business users…

    This patch may be harmless, but why it was released and where it actually applies, it is still a mystery.

    The KB article has been updated with a release date of April 4. No doubt this version has more goodies to break the back of any system trying to avoid Win10 1903. Which is funny because 1803 and 1809 are supposed to grow native, built-in 1903 blocking features. More about that Monday morning in the AskWoody Plus Newsletter.

    If you want to well and truly hide it — which isn’t easy — follow @PKCano’s directions.

    Odd that MS hasn’t added Win1o 1809 to its list of affected versions.

    If that helped, take a second to support AskWoody on Patreon

    Home Forums Microsoft re-re-re…-releases KB 4023057, the “Update to Win10 1507, 1511, 1607, 1703, 1709, and 1803 for update reliability”

    Tagged: 

    This topic contains 30 replies, has 13 voices, and was last updated by

     PKCano 1 week, 1 day ago.

    • Author
      Posts
    • #349304 Reply

      woody
      Da Boss

      I last talked about it on Nov. 19: KB 4023057 has been updated, with a lengthy KB article and very little substance that I can discern. This update in
      [See the full post at: Microsoft re-re-re…-releases KB 4023057, the “Update to Win10 1507, 1511, 1607, 1703, 1709, and 1803 for update reliability”]

      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #349308 Reply

      b
      AskWoody Plus

      … the only explanation that makes sense to me: … This patch may be harmless, …

      If you want to well and truly hide it — which isn’t easy — follow @pkcano’s directions.

      Who needs reliability anyway? Much better to block it and whine about “instability”. 🙄

      Cannon fodder Chump Daft glutton Idiot Sucker More intrepid Crazy/ignorant Toxic drinker Saluted blockhead "Finger sharpener" (Group ASAP) WX1903

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #349321 Reply

        woody
        Da Boss

        HA! You have a point there….

        But tell me… you won’t be upgrading to 1903 as soon as it’s available, will you?

        • #349328 Reply

          b
          AskWoody Plus

          Of course!

          I’m on Release Preview ring, so should have 1903 in a few days.

          Cannon fodder Chump Daft glutton Idiot Sucker More intrepid Crazy/ignorant Toxic drinker Saluted blockhead "Finger sharpener" (Group ASAP) WX1903

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #349494 Reply

        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        Who needs reliability anyway? Much better to block it and whine about “instability”.

        KB 4023057 has nothing to do with reliability nor with stability. It has only to do with letting Microsoft push Windows 10 feature updates.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #349309 Reply

      anonymous

      I updated the day after we went to defcon 4 and before doing so , I ran wushowhide and sure enough it was there. I hid it and the update went okay. I believe, and I may be wrong, that this update does no good if you’re looking to not upgrade to the next version of Windows. I suspect it installs files needed for the next upgrade and phones home with the message that ” I’m ready, hit me with it”.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #349320 Reply

      warrenrumak
      AskWoody Plus

      I updated the day after we went to defcon 4 and before doing so , I ran wushowhide and sure enough it was there. I hid it and the update went okay. I believe, and I may be wrong, that this update does no good if you’re looking to not upgrade to the next version of Windows. I suspect it installs files needed for the next upgrade and phones home with the message that ” I’m ready, hit me with it”.

      No, that’s not quite right.  All this component does is keep Windows Update healthy.

      It replaces a bunch of manual techniques people used to need to do when things went wrong with Windows Update on their machine, such as resetting a corrupted Windows Update database, deleting registry entries or backup files that are getting in the way, and temporarily compressing files to free up disk space for updates.  If you’ve never had to fight any of these issues manually on a machine, lucky you.

      I can’t overstate how helpful the compression thing is when you’ve got the OS crammed onto a small SSD.  There are lots of highly-compressable files hanging around on our file systems.

      Note that this is for -all- Windows Updates, including Defender, .NET and drivers.  It’s not just for feature updates.

      This component also ships with Windows, but it gets updated independently of the rest of the updates in order to ensure that Windows Update has the best chance of succeeding, regardless of  how many security updates you’re missing.

       

      • This reply was modified 1 week, 4 days ago by
         warrenrumak.
      5 users thanked author for this post.
      • #349323 Reply

        woody
        Da Boss

        I was surprised that it isn’t advertised for 1809. Any idea why?

        • #349333 Reply

          MrJimPhelps
          AskWoody_MVP

          I was surprised that it isn’t advertised for 1809. Any idea why?

          Windows is supposed to be a work in progress, continually improving. Maybe the improvement or fix that this patch addresses is already in 1809, and they are merely bringing previous versions of Windows 10 up to date on that one fix.

          Group "L" (Linux Mint)
          with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
          • This reply was modified 1 week, 4 days ago by
             MrJimPhelps.
        • #349338 Reply

          PKCano
          Da Boss

          I believe KB 4023057 resets settings to Microsoft defaults (Scheduled tasks, Services, etc) to facilitate UPGRADE. At the moment, there is no upgrade for v1809, so there is no current need to install it in that version.

          2 users thanked author for this post.
          • #349399 Reply

            anonymous

            Yes KB4023057 is for facilitating upgrading Windows 10 to new versions as he described, its other primary purpose is also to prevent tampering with windows update.

            This statement does need verification:

            Note that this is for -all- Windows Updates, including Defender, .NET and drivers. It’s not just for feature updates.

            1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #349388 Reply

          Alex5723
          AskWoody Plus

          Probably deferred for a week or two like other 1809 updates in the last months.

      • #349348 Reply

        Tex265
        AskWoody Plus

        Warrenrumak writes:

        No, that’s not quite right.  All this component does is keep Windows Update healthy.

        This sounds quite positive if correct.

        Could you please tell us where you obtained your information? As no one else seems to have been able to find out what specifically this KB contains.

        Thanks

        Windows 10 Pro x64 v1803 and Windows 7 Pro SP1 x64
        2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #349331 Reply

      CADesertRat
      AskWoody Plus

      I just got it again yesterday. I just let it update but it’s irritating that it requires a reboot every time.

      Don't take yourself so seriously, no one else does 🙂
      Grp. A with 2 Win 7 Pro, also 2 Win 10 Pro currently 1803 (1 Desktop, 1 Laptop).

      • #349382 Reply

        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        I have installed KB 4023057 on my 1803 7 times ! never required re-boot.
        I usually uninstalled the current KB 4023057 (it is an application, not under updates) and than installed the new KB 4023057.

        • #349449 Reply

          CADesertRat
          AskWoody Plus

          The last few times it has installed on my 1803, it required a restart. Maybe I’m just special 🙂

          Don't take yourself so seriously, no one else does 🙂
          Grp. A with 2 Win 7 Pro, also 2 Win 10 Pro currently 1803 (1 Desktop, 1 Laptop).

          • This reply was modified 1 week, 4 days ago by
             CADesertRat.
    • #349336 Reply

      anonymous

      Question for PKCano or Woody ?  So, based on the reply #349320, I was under the impression that we do not install this and to hide it. What is the recommended path for this. Do we install or not install ?

      • #349346 Reply

        PKCano
        Da Boss

        My interpretation is that you can install it if you want to UPGRADE to the next (or later) version.
        I have completely avoided installing it on all the versions I have had (all are Pro and able to defer updates) and had no problems with UPDATING the CUs each month when I wanted to do the updating. To be honest, I have never had a problem with UPGRADING when I chose either, by backing off the deferrals and changing SAC to SACT, even leaving the other settings changed that I have manipulated.

        So my personal assessment is, that it is not necessary for either operation.

        • #349351 Reply

          anonymous

          Thank You…that was my understanding also and since I don’t was to upgrade every 6 months, I will continue to hide it. I have not had any problems with updating so far and I’ve been hiding it all along.

    • #349379 Reply

      anonymous

      KB4023057 is not a patch. It is a program and it ultimately gets listed in Programs and Features.  This is why it can’t be blocked effectively with the same techniques used to block other monthly updates. It can be uninstalled like a normal program.

      The purpose of KB4023057 likely addresses the possibility of insufficient storage when installing the next Feature upgrade.  This can be confirmed by running Disk Cleanup as Administrator after KB4023057 is installed and observing the additional line items with check boxes.  They include Compress OS, delete all Restore Points, etc.

      The Feature upgrade installer probably runs Disk Cleanup with the additional boxes checked when it needs more storage, especially for the Windows.old folder on PCs with 32-64GB of flash storage. What will happen on a PC with larger storage that is filled up with videos, photos, etc. is an interesting question.

      3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #349410 Reply

        anonymous

        This might explain why it keeps popping up. If it is a “repair” program, MS might like it to be run regularly much like with the Malware Removal Tool which pops up each month.

    • #349416 Reply

      NetDef
      AskWoody_MVP

      From the current MS KB article:

      “This update is not intended for use in enterprise environments.”

      Thus the reason you don’t see this on WSUS.  My suspicion (untested) is that this KB might break WSUS dependent workstations until they do a GPUpdate.  Not a big deal.

      For home users, or small office users, there appear to be some fixes in this KB to help mitigate corrupt update store issues.  Or if you need such, there is always the FixIt tool from MS, which appears to do the same thing on demand.

      https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/10164/fix-windows-update-errors

      Note that this fixit also breaks WSUS temporarily – until the fixed workstation re-syncs with group policy.

      Not sure why all the fear around this KB . . .  it’s a regular update to portions of the WU Service Stack, that’s it.

       

      ~ Group "Weekend" ~

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #349460 Reply

      anonymous

      “Not sure why all the fear around this KB . . .  it’s a regular update to portions of the WU Service Stack, that’s it”

      No it isn’t. It’s a program (not an update) that does a number of changes to Windows Update and the rest of the PC in order to ensure feature updates are installed. It will be pushed onto your PC every month as long as you are not running the most recent feature version of Win10 and KB4023057 is not installed. It is not part of Windows. It’s a potentially unwanted program Microsoft plops on your PC when you are not running the version of Win10 they want you to be running.

      Here is what it does:

      (Source: https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4023057/update-to-windows-10-versions-1507-1511-1607-1703-1709-and-1803-for-up )

      – It might change your power settings so your PC stays awake longer in order to install updates. Yeah, cool.

      – It might change your network settings. Some people have had problems with network connectivity because of this.

      – It might compress your files in the users folder. Note that Microsoft doesn’t offer to delete their telemetry or all the trash they scatter around the drive in ProgramData, AppData and so on.

      – It might nag you about too-low drive space cause Windows 10 needs to nag more, right?

      – It might run Disk Cleanup, which will actually clean up much of the garbage Windows scatters around. Cleaning out windows update’s leftovers potentially takes hours though.

      – KB4023057 installs a service or two (can’t remember anymore, I reverted to Windows 8.1 due to disgust at 10’s behavior and I have never felt better!), that monitor and periodically reset windows update’s settings to what Microsoft wants them to be. There are tasks added in task scheduler and various other things that re-enable parts of KB4023057 so that you can’t just stop it executing. You can, however, uninstall it in Programs and Features. But windows will just reinstall it, lol! There is a way to block installation using permissions. This is what I did when I still had 10.

      – “This update is not intended for use in enterprise environments.” That’s because businesses would immediately freak out at what this thing does.

      – It will reenable and modify settings in the registry to make Windows Update do stuff Microsoft wants it to do again. What the owner of the PC wants is of no importance to Microsoft.

      ————–

      Some people do not want feature updates (or any update at all, for that matter) installed on Microsoft’s schedule. When I was using 10, I did not want feature updates. They generally add stuff I don’t want at the cost of about half a day. No thanks. Now that I’m using 8.1 again, I install the security-only updates manually about a month late–pretty much when Woody says it’s time. Let the cannon fodder auto-updaters eat it. I’ll wait until it’s safe.

      I have a pretty decent PC that’s about 3-4 years old, and the feature updates for Windows 10 would always take around an hour to install (on an SSD) and then not work properly after. This would force me to install it myself manually. A clean installation always takes a few hours–install the OS, install programs, set all the settings MS scattered around, and on and on. Basically, half a day wasted to install and tune to a tolerable form something I didn’t want in the first place. To get the PC truly back to its fighting form would take weeks of adjusting little settings here and there.

      I even made a couple batch files to speed up the tuning phase, but Microsoft keeps changing some of the settings every version. This is by design, of course–They’re doing the Facebook trick of adding new privacy invasions all the time which are on by default. Pretty sure no one wants Microsoft sending samples of what we type (passwords? emails to loved ones? financial information?) for “analysis” to “make windows better.” Yeah OK.

      3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #349487 Reply

        NetDef
        AskWoody_MVP

        Here’s a perspective for you to consider.

        Unlike most updates – this one is dead easy to remove and it’s not pushed via WSUS. And frankly it’s easy to block if you are a super-user (which if you are reading this you likely are!)

        Why might that be?

        Because it allows IT admins and knowledgeable people that want more control to exercise that control.  You don’t need this update if you are 99% of the people that read this blog.

        But we are a tiny minority of super users.  In the rest of the world people run into problems with Windows Update caused by malware, glitches in the system, poor maintenance, poor computing habits, you name it.  This update is for them – to help keep their machines usable and to keep their machines updated (not just feature updates.)

        ~ Group "Weekend" ~

        • #349489 Reply

          RamRod
          AskWoody Lounger

          Does uninstalling 4023057 remove the Update Assistant and associated directory as well as the tasks in task scheduler? If not it’s not really uninstalled is it?

          • #349497 Reply

            abbodi86
            AskWoody_MVP

            KB4023057 does not install the UA, nor uninstall it

            1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #349478 Reply

      abbodi86
      AskWoody_MVP
    • #349495 Reply

      Alex5723
      AskWoody Plus

      The last few times it has installed on my 1803, it required a restart. Maybe I’m just special 🙂

      Maybe it did because you haven’t removed the current installed version before installing the new version..

    • #349690 Reply

      Fred
      AskWoody Lounger

      A while agoo, I followed the instructions of PCKano to hide these not-asked-for-updates, Though now Microsoft choosed to wakeup my laptop, installed this “update” and restarted instead of closed it down. So it drained my battery. (*ANGRY*)

      • This reply was modified 1 week, 3 days ago by
         Fred.
    • #350021 Reply

      anonymous

      Count me as a person who wished he could block this update. For some reason, after it installs on my kid’s computer, the wireless adapter stops working. It says it is enabled, but it cannot find any networks to connect to. I uninstall it and reboot the computer, and everything is working fine…until windows downloads it again. I am on the latest version of drivers, and it still does not work. In fact, once the computer is updated, I pretty much lose the ability to do anything with the network adapter. Something is going wrong with the services stack that handles wireless networking, and so services cannot start/stop correctly in order to even troubleshoot. (Running the troubleshooter, windows is unable to reset the networking services.)

      So, I do wish it were possible to disable this. If it were needed for some future update, why not wait until that future update is ready? It is only a 1 MB download, and could have easily been packaged with those updates.

    Please follow the -Lounge Rules- no personal attacks, no swearing, and politics/religion are relegated to the Rants forum.

    Reply To: Microsoft re-re-re…-releases KB 4023057, the “Update to Win10 1507, 1511, 1607, 1703, 1709, and 1803 for update reliability”

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