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  • Patch Lady – what about server 2008 R2?

    Posted on December 24th, 2019 at 10:58 Susan Bradley Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/cloud-platform/extended-security-updates


    Extended Security Updates for on-premises or hosted environments:

    “Extended Security Updates will also be available for workloads running on-premises or in a hosting environment like another cloud provider. Customers running SQL Server or Windows Server under licenses with active Software Assurance under an Enterprise Agreement (EA), Enterprise Subscription Agreement (EAS), a Server & Cloud Enrollment (SCE), an Enrollment for Education Solutions (EES), or Subscription can purchase Extended Security Updates annually for three years after End of Support date.
    Alternatively, if customers already have active Software Assurance through Open, Select, or MPSA, programs, they can purchase Extended Security Updates as long as product licenses come through an active EA, EAS, SCE or EES agreement or Subscription. Product licenses and Software Assurance do not need to reside on the same enrollment. However, customers cannot purchase Extended Security Updates outside of the EA, EAS, SCE, EES, or Subscription licensing programs.
    Customers can purchase Extended Security Updates only for the servers they need to cover. Extended Security Updates can be purchased directly from Microsoft or a Microsoft licensing partner.”

    Translation… if you don’t already have software assurance with an existing vendor you can’t merely add a license for 2008 or 2008 R2 extended security updates through the CSP process like we did with Windows 7 licenses.

    You can be in the process of moving that server to Azure ….

    “Extended Security Updates in Azure: Customers who migrate workloads to Azure Virtual Machines (IaaS) will have access to Extended Security Updates for both SQL Server and Windows Server 2008 and 2008 R2 for three years after the End of Support dates for no additional charges above the cost of running the virtual machine. For many customers, this is an easy first step before upgrading or modernizing with newer versions or services in Azure. Those that decide to move to Azure SQL Database Managed Instance (PaaS) will also have access to continuous security updates, as this is a fully managed solution. Customers do not need Software Assurance to receive Extended Security Updates in Azure.
    Eligible customers can use the Azure Hybrid Benefit (available to customers with active Software Assurance or Server Subscriptions) to obtain discounts on the license of Azure Virtual Machines (IaaS) or Azure SQL Database Managed Instance (PaaS). These customers will also have access to Extended Security Updates for no additional charges above the cost of running the virtual machine.”

    For the consultants in the crowd reading this… as far as I interpret this, you need to have a Software assurance contract on that Server OS…. or you have to move that server instance to an Azure virtual machine.

    If you are a SPLA hoster…..

    “Hosted environments: Customers who license Windows Server or SQL Server 2008 or 2008 R2 through an authorized SPLA hoster will need to separately purchase Extended Security Updates under an Enterprise or Server and Cloud Enrollment either directly from Microsoft for approximately 75% of the full on-premises license cost annually or from their Microsoft reseller for use in the hosted environment. The price of Extended Security Updates acquired through Microsoft resellers is set by the reseller. Pricing for Windows Server Extended Security Updates is based on Windows Server Standard per core pricing, based on the number of virtual cores in the hosted virtual machine, and subject to a minimum of 16 licenses per instance. Pricing for SQL Server Extended Security Updates is based on SQL Server per core pricing, based on the number of virtual cores in the hosted virtual machine, and subject to a minimum of 4 licenses per instance. Software Assurance is not required. Contact your Microsoft reseller or account team for more details.”

    I am reaching out to my software assurance vendor www.softwareone.com to ask about the details.