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  • Q: Is it time to install Win10 version 1809?

    Posted on March 4th, 2019 at 13:08 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Just got a great question from SC:

    I need clarification. About mid-January 2019, amid all the 1809 version hullaballoo, I followed AskWoody guidance and set my system to “metered connection” in order to not get the automatic updates.

    I understood the guidance said we would be notified when it would be safe/appropriate to turn the “metered connection” off. I have been awaiting that guidance. Its possible I have missed it or did not recognize it when I saw it.

    To say I am just a little savvy to Windows & IT is a serious overstatement, thus I depend on your help more than might make you comfortable!

    The articles on 1809 updates in this newsletter seem somewhat mixed to me as to whether I should now have version 1809 installed .

    So, I ask, should I now turn off the metered connection or wait? And if/when I turn metering off will all updates/versions needed be automatically installed or do need to take other action, such as implied in this newsletter?

    I have Windows 10, Home Edition, Version 1803 (OS Build 17134.590)

    Many thanks for all you do!

    You’ll see that there are many voices on the forum, and in the newsletter, with different advice. Right now, I still say it’s best to wait until Microsoft gives the go-ahead on Win10 version 1809. But — as Susan notes in this week’s AskWoody Plus Newsletter — we aren’t quite sure how Microsoft is going to announce when 1809 is “ready for business.” The terminology has changed once again (is that the sixth time in the past three years?) and it’s still up in the air. In that same Newsletter, Fred Langa gives directions for upgrading to 1809, specifically so you can use the new feature that shows power usage for each app. As Fred notes, Microsoft screwed up the 1803-to-1809 migration so badly that patching may never be the same.

    We can only hope.

    There are lots of people on the forums who have upgraded to 1809 with no ill effect. It’s certainly in much better shape than it was just a couple of months ago.

    For now, I say sit tight, unless you have a compelling reason to pick up one of the new features (such as the power usage list). I’m gonna wait until Microsoft gives 1809 a clean bill of health (CBOH channel?), and then wait a little while longer, before giving the go-ahead.

    As we get larger, you’re going to see that more and more. Different people — different savvy people — will have varying opinions. If you want to keep up on individual patches, watch Susan’s Patch Watch List and @PKCano’s updating details. But if you’re working on your own machine, and don’t want to turn into a patching guru (trademark pending), keep an eye on the MS-DEFCON number. It’s simple. Maybe even simplistic. But it’s a good way to know which way the wind blows.

    If that helped, take a second to support AskWoody on Patreon

    Home Forums Q: Is it time to install Win10 version 1809?

    Tagged: 

    This topic contains 30 replies, has 14 voices, and was last updated by  anonymous 2 weeks, 1 day ago.

    • Author
      Posts
    • #337072 Reply

      woody
      Da Boss

      Just got a great question from SC: I need clarification. About mid-January 2019, amid all the 1809 version hullaballoo, I followed AskWoody guidance a
      [See the full post at: Q: Is it time to install Win10 version 1809?]

      5 users thanked author for this post.
    • #337095 Reply

      warrenrumak
      AskWoody Plus

      Like a lot of people, I’ve been running 1809 on my production systems for a couple of months.  No problems at all, even though I really beat on the poor thing.  Multiple VMs, tons of desktop & Store apps, 40+GB of memory used, multiple USB and Bluetooth devices…. it never crashes.

      But if Windows Update isn’t offering 1809, it’s probably wise to just wait it out or use the Upgrade Assistant to learn why.  The block for older versions of iCloud is still there, for example…. if you don’t upgrade to the latest version of everything in Apple Software Update, you might never get 1809.

      Actually…….. heh, that might be one interesting way of preventing Feature Updates from being installed.  Find an old app that is blocked…. install it….. and enjoy.

      • This reply was modified 3 weeks ago by
         warrenrumak.
      3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #337104 Reply

        b
        AskWoody Plus

        The block for older versions of iCloud is still there, for example…. if you don’t upgrade to the latest version of everything in Apple Software Update, you might never get 1809.

        It’s no longer listed in blocking issues: Current status of Windows, version 1809

        Cannon fodder Chump Daft glutton Idiot Sucker More intrepid Crazy/ignorant Toxic drinker "Saluted blockhead" (Group ASAP)

        • #337144 Reply

          warrenrumak
          AskWoody Plus

          The block for older versions of iCloud is still there, for example…. if you don’t upgrade to the latest version of everything in Apple Software Update, you might never get 1809.

          It’s no longer listed in blocking issues: Current status of Windows, version 1809

          Please read what I said:  The block still applies to older versions of iCloud for Windows.  Apple fixed the bugs in their product and released a new version, 7.8.1, that is compatible with Windows 10 1809.

          Try it for yourself and see.

          • #337533 Reply

            EP
            AskWoody_MVP

            but why would you stick to using old versions of iCloud, warrenrumak?
            I mean c’mon, upgrade when given the opportunity since apple may retire support for older versions of it

            • This reply was modified 2 weeks, 6 days ago by
               EP.
    • #337098 Reply

      Lars220
      AskWoody Lounger

      CBOH Channel amateur flopperoo reporting in with news from Bogdan Popa at Softpdeia News website, here are two interesting links to review and consider:

      https://news.softpedia.com/news/october-update-slowly-becoming-microsoft-s-biggest-windows-10-flopperoo-525109.shtml

      https://news.softpedia.com/news/does-it-still-make-any-sense-to-install-windows-10-version-1809-right-now-525121.shtml

      Best advice is from our Fearless Leader Woody who said: “For now, I say sit tight,”

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #337295 Reply

      anonymous

      I never really understood the whole concept of delaying feature updates. With that I mean: I have setup Win 10 pro at the semi annual schedule (that is: NOT targeted) with a delay of 365 days. But actually a delay from which moment? From the moment I upgraded, from the date Microsoft declared (in my case) 1803 business ready or from the moment the NEXT version (in this case 1810) is declared business ready? To be honest I got lost and I have more and more the feeling that by using Win 10 I am sitting on a ticking timebomb…

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #337302 Reply

        b
        AskWoody Plus

        … or from the moment the NEXT version (in this case 1810) is declared business ready?

        Yes, that one. In the past, and probably just once more in the near future. With those settings you shouldn’t get 1809 for at least the next year. But don’t get too used to it because Microsoft have said our ability to select the Targeted or non-Targeted Semi-Annual Channel will not exist after the update to 1903:
        Windows Update for Business and the retirement of SAC-T

        Cannon fodder Chump Daft glutton Idiot Sucker More intrepid Crazy/ignorant Toxic drinker "Saluted blockhead" (Group ASAP)

        • #337923 Reply

          anonymous

          Thanks, that’s good to know. Worried that I had to upgrade yet again this summer. Now that’ll be probably next year. I saw the removal of SAC etc. Yet another kick from Microsoft to its clients: they MUST obey them. I switched to macOS for production, some Windows machines that are too new to just throw away are still running 10. But if they break down they will for sure not be replaced. The update terror and related problems of them became just unbearable.

    • #337299 Reply

      Fred
      AskWoody Lounger

      Just got a great question from SC: I need clarification. About mid-January 2019, amid all the 1809 version hullaballoo, I followed AskWoody guidance a[See the full post at: Q: Is it time to install Win10 version 1809?]

      Woody: great to ask this question. In my point of view: there has been such an effort from many others and me , with the never underestimated advices from the great  AskWoody_Family , to get W10-v.1803 a bit right and smooth…… that I am tired and anxious to start all over again. I never read something from (holy) Microsoft or the many many experts that the near future will be better in update-behaviour.  There is so much more to do in life and with more fun to make a computer getting to work. After all, this @#€#@(beep) thing is just A TOOL TO GET THINGS DONE. So I will try to wait a while, and will explore Linux (what a pleasant experience that is, running smooth on a Windows-Vista laptop) !

      • This reply was modified 3 weeks ago by
         Fred.
    • #337337 Reply

      Mele20
      AskWoody Lounger

      I never really understood the whole concept of delaying feature updates. With that I mean: I have setup Win 10 pro at the semi annual schedule (that is: NOT targeted) with a delay of 365 days. But actually a delay from which moment? From the moment I upgraded, from the date Microsoft declared (in my case) 1803 business ready or from the moment the NEXT version (in this case 1810) is declared business ready? To be honest I got lost and I have more and more the feeling that by using Win 10 I am sitting on a ticking timebomb…

      The delay (if set to 365 days) is until the final day of Microsoft Support for that version of Windows 10 Pro.  I got a new computer mid Dec 2017 with 1709 installed.  I set it for a delay of 365 days but I still have it. 1709 goes UNsupported on April 9 so that date is what you go by not the date a version was installed and you set it for 365 days.  1803 leaves Mainstream support on Nov 12 2018.

      https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/lifecycle/search?alpha=Windows%2010%20version%201803%20(Home%20Pro%20Pro%20for%20Workstation%20IoT%20Core)

      I’ve got one month before I have to decide if I want to upgrade to 1803 for six months or get 1809 which reaches EOL on May 12 2020 and have slightly over a year before I have go through it all yet again.

      • #338388 Reply

        anonymous

        It’s EXACTLY that feeling I lost with 10, from the first day I installed there were troubles. Troubles that started to cost more and more time. It started feeling like fighting against a moloch with totally different ideas about using and maintaining computers than I had. I lost countless nights on repairing the damage bodged updates and especially upgrades caused.

        What I learned though is that ‘we’ here and at some other forums are only a small percentage of Windows users. The vast majority are home users. They don’t use their computers for work. They don’t see the signs that something is going terribly wrong. And if it goes wrong, well then they just reinstall everything. For them, that’s just common practice of Windows; it always was.

        If you have to earn your income with a computer it’s indeed just a tool. If that tool doesn’t fit your hands or costs more time to operate then needed, it’s time to switch the tool. I think that most people at Woody know deep in their hearts that – for them – Windws 10 is a dead end road. They are just understandably scared to make a switch to an alternative. But in the end it’s the only right thing to do. There is no other option, unless you want to keep wondering every day again if your computers fire up normally and no unwanted updates are going to he installed before you are allowed to start working. That’s not good for ones heart and neither good for productivity.

        We all just need a reliable tool, that is under our control. Stable, safe and secure. That’s just not Windows. Times are changing luckily and there are many alternatives nowadays. So maybe let’s all stop ‘nagging’ about something Microsoft is simply never going to listen to anyway. They think they know what us good for us. If you don’t feel the same, it’s really time to change to an alternative.

        3 users thanked author for this post.
        • #338399 Reply

          Zaphyrus
          AskWoody Lounger

          What is scarier dear anon is that people aren’t even aware of how messed up is Windows 10

          They aren’t even aware that their computers re-install their OS each 6 months

          Just someone who don't want Windows to mess with its computer.
          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #338400 Reply

            b
            AskWoody Plus

            They aren’t even aware that their computers re-install their OS each 6 months

            Because the free upgrade downloads and installs automatically in the background and then restarts outside active hours? Smooth!

            Cannon fodder Chump Daft glutton Idiot Sucker More intrepid Crazy/ignorant Toxic drinker "Saluted blockhead" (Group ASAP)

            • #338410 Reply

              anonymous

              Because the free upgrade downloads and installs automatically in the background and then restarts outside active hours? Smooth!

              This would be great news if the updates were 100% reliable. The 1809 initial update demonstrated just how “un-smooth” this process can be. Even though not as bad as that one, there is a history of regular bad upgrades for Windows 10.

              1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #338778 Reply

              anonymous

              In reality, mst pc’s are switched off outside what Windows defines as active hours. The end result is that after some time the upgrade is just installed no matter what. Even during office hours at critical times. Not exactly my definition of smooth. And no, we are not going to leave Windows running unattended after leaving office. Big chance that the next morning there will be no functioning computer left.

              2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #337393 Reply

      anonymous

      Thanks Woody for the update on your advice to installing the win10 versions! I find it really helpful! I’m still on 1607 as I speak, and will jump to 1809 once it comes or once you recommend it.

      • #337536 Reply

        EP
        AskWoody_MVP

        the v1607 version is no longer supported unless running either education or enterprise edition of 1607, which is supported until April 2019

        • #338028 Reply

          anonymous

          Yes, I realize that it’s no longer supported as of last year, but considering the amount of hassle constantly upgrading at the speed MS is going at, I’m ready to risk manage this until something comes up that tells me otherwise. I don’t want to upgrade to one currently stable version, only to have it become obsolete in a few months again.

    • #337836 Reply

      DriftyDonN
      AskWoody Plus

      I pushed the envelope I think. I Upgraded from Home ver 1803 to Pro ver 1803, then after about 2 weeks, got antsy and upgraded to ver 1809. Now I notice some minor tics, but one in particular…updating even tho set to delay 365 days for feature upgrade and 30 days for quality updates, still win 10 checks for updates. Pause says if activated will pause until april xx.

      Perhaps there are bugs I’m unaware of so am thinking should I go back to 1803 until further notice?

      Thank you!

      D

      • #337847 Reply

        PKCano
        Da Boss

        If you “Pause” updates, at the end of the “Pause” time Windows Update will download and install everything that is is the updates queue.

        Delaying Quality Updates for a given time, Windows may check for for updates but I don’t think they will show up in the Update queue until the end of the delay (from release date) time.

        There is a setting in Group Policy in Pro that will keep them from downloading until you say so. It won’t keep them from showing up in Windows Update, but it will keep them from downloading until you give the go-ahead.

        In the search bar type “gpedit” (without quotes. Navigate to :
        Windows Components>Windows Update>Configure Automatic Update.
        Double click on it. Choose “Enable” and set the value to “2” – Notify download and install.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #337858 Reply

          DriftyDonN
          AskWoody Plus

          Thanks! Had to drill down for “Windows Components>Windows Update>Configure Automatic Update” as these were not top of the listing! 😉 did me good. Appreciate the feed back.
          Now, still pondering ver 1809 bugs that are not readily apparent and whether I should go back(?) to ver 1803 and wait as per Woody’s advice…..
          In any case, THANK YOU!
          D

          • #337859 Reply

            PKCano
            Da Boss

            I am running a VM with 1809, but the actual computers I am supporting I have kept on 1803. One is my TownHouse Office’s computer – Outlook, QuickBooks, check reading s/w, etc. Wouldn’t dare risk 1809 at this point in it’s development.

            1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #337862 Reply

      DriftyDonN
      AskWoody Plus

      Yes, that sounds like advice I should have listened to! Hmmm… will reinstalling latest image for 1803(about a week ago) have an adverse effect on my future return to 1809(if ever)?

      • #337864 Reply

        PKCano
        Da Boss

        Not that I know of. You can restore the 1803 image.
        You should be able to reinstall 1809 whenever you (or Microsoft LOL) want to .

        BTW You should be also using wushowhide.diagcab to control things – like no drivers (that’s a setting in GP also) and updates you don’t want like KB4023057.

      • #337881 Reply

        joep517
        AskWoody MVP

        All the Win10 systems I have on 1809 are just fine. I’ve let 1809 install on its own on several and “searched” for it with Windows Update on a few others. They are all running well.

        I recommend you run 1809 for a period of time. If you don’t run across a big problem leave it alone. Try to solve minor issues by posting in the appropriate Windows 10 forum.

        --Joe

    • #337952 Reply

      anonymous

      I’m just going to update from 1803 to 1903 when 1903 stabilizes. At this stage, 1809 is so borked it might as well be skipped.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #339347 Reply

        b
        AskWoody Plus

        Borked how exactly?

        (Posted from an 1809 which has had 18 trouble-free updates.)

        Cannon fodder Chump Daft glutton Idiot Sucker More intrepid Crazy/ignorant Toxic drinker "Saluted blockhead" (Group ASAP)

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #339913 Reply

        anonymous

        Basically, looking at the new ‘features’ that somehow seem to justify a new Windows installation (which gifted programmer moved colors, transparancy and other nonsense effects to the core of Windows we will never know…), it’s absolutely useless for the average person to upgrade every 6 months. In fact, looking at what was rolled out as feature updates the last 18 months or so, none of those upgrades were worth the risks of installing a ‘new’ os over the old. It’s all make-up and fancy nonsense to keep home users ‘happy’. They get frenzy over transparancy-effects, Candy Crush and other needless stuff. But hey, I think we are fighting a long lost battle. Microsoft pushed Windows as a ‘service’. So either we have to drive this rather shabby road under eternal construction or take a detour over a brand new highway. Enough to choose from nowadays.

    • #339311 Reply

      Lugh
      AskWoody_MVP

      If you have to earn your income with a computer it’s indeed just a tool. If that tool doesn’t fit your hands or costs more time to operate then needed, it’s time to switch the tool. I think that most people at Woody know deep in their hearts that – for them – Windws 10 is a dead end road.

      Here’s a Woody person who has no problems with Win10, and hasn’t had since 2016. My better two-thirds has the same experience. We both rely on our computers for our income.

      We both know quite a few other people whose income depends on their Windows computer. No more tales of woe than when they ran Win7 or 8—ie a careless user is always in danger.

      In summary, Windows 10 is as alive as any previous version of Windows for me and my circle.

      Lugh.
      ~
      Alienware Aurora R6; Win10 Home x64 1803; Office 365 x32
      i7-7700; GeForce GTX 1060; 16GB DDR4 2400; 2 x 256G SSD, 4TB HD

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #339362 Reply

      JohnW
      AskWoody Plus

      I find Windows 10 1803 has been very stable and trouble free for me. But I am not ready to take a chance on “1809” until it is “ready for business”.

      I take images daily, weekly, and monthly, so I know that I can always roll back to an earlier system image in a few minutes. But I just don’t care to be a Windows beta tester. My computer is a tool, and I just want it to run. I value stability over having the latest thing.

    Please follow the -Lounge Rules- no personal attacks, no swearing, and politics/religion are relegated to the Rants forum.

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