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  • Microsoft confirms problems with June 2017 security patches for Outlook, provides workarounds

    Posted on June 19th, 2017 at 11:12 PKCano Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Microsoft has acknowledged that the June 2017 security patches for Office Outlook can cause Email attachment blocking problems. This affects Outlook 2007 (KB 3191898), Outlook 2010 (KB 3203467), Outlook 2013 (KB 3191938), and Outlook 2016 (KB 3191932). The description of the Security Updates comes with this warning about known issues:

    If an email message includes an attached email message, and the attached email message’s subject line ends with an unsafe file name extension as listed in the Blocked attachments in Outlook page, the email attachment will be blocked for recipients. To fix this issue, save the email message to the computer and rename its subject line so that it does not end with an unsafe file name extension. Then, attach it to the email message to be sent.

    The blocking of attachments with file extensions that are on the list is meant to protect against opening files that could be harmful to your computer. However there have been reports that other attachments such as Rich Text (.rtf) and Word and Excel are also being blocked. Microsoft has issued several workarounds for this.

    For Office 2007 and 2010 Rich Text attachments (.rtf)

    • Forward the email to yourself and then open the attachments from the forwarded email.
    • Change the email format to HTML, or Text format.
    • Save the attachments to your computer, using one of the following methods, then open them from the saved location:
      • Drag and drop the attachments to your desktop.
      • Go to File > Save Attachments.
      • Copy and paste the attachment to your computer.

    For Outlook 2007, Outlook 2010, Outlook 2013, and Outlook 2016 attachments containing consecutive periods (…) or exclmation mark (!).
    If you’re sure the attachment was sent from a trusted source, proceed to Open or Save the attachment.

    For Outlook 2013 and Outlook 2016
    If you set ShowLevel1Attach to allow Outlook to display Level 1 attachments, you may see the error: “One or more objects in this file have been disabled due to your policy settings

    • Change the email format to HTML, or Text format.
    • Save the attachments to your computer, using one of the following methods, then open them from the saved location:
      • Drag and drop the attachments to your desktop.
      • Go to File > Save Attachments.
      • Copy and paste the attachment to your computer.

    For a complete description of the warning messages, and the workarounds Microsoft has issued, see You receive an error when opening attachments in Outlook

    @gborn is also reporting issues with Outlook after installing June 2017 security patches on Born’s Tech and Windows World

  • Office non-security patches for June 2017 are here

    Posted on June 6th, 2017 at 13:47 PKCano Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    No, you don’t want to install them yet. We’re still at MS-DEFCON 2

    Office 2013

    Update for Microsoft Excel 2013 (KB3191940)
    Update for Microsoft Office 2013 (KB3172501)
    Update for Microsoft Office 2013 (KB3178709)
    Update for Microsoft Office 2013 (KB3191872)
    Update for Microsoft Office 2013 (KB3191874)
    Update for Microsoft PowerPoint 2013 (KB3191935)
    Update for Microsoft Project 2013 (KB3191941)
    Update for Microsoft SharePoint Server 2013 Client Components SDK (KB3172527)

    Office 2016

    Update for Microsoft Excel 2016 (KB3191922)
    Update for Microsoft Office 2016 (KB3115281)
    Update for Microsoft Office 2016 (KB3141457)
    Update for Microsoft Office 2016 (KB3191859)
    Update for Microsoft Office 2016 (KB3191868)
    Update for Microsoft Office 2016 (KB3191920)
    Update for Microsoft Office 2016 (KB3191929)
    Update for Microsoft Office 2016 (KB3191933)
    Update for Microsoft PowerPoint 2016 (KB3191921)
    Update for Microsoft Project 2016 (KB3191934)
    Update for Microsoft Visio 2016 (KB3191918)

  • Microsoft pulls botched Office 2010 non-security patch KB 3128031

    Posted on May 4th, 2017 at 09:38 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Article at InfoWorld Woody on Windows

    Thanks to our anonymous poster

    UPDATE: As of 5 pm US Central Time, the links in the KB article are working. The date on the download file is 18 April – which would be a reasonable date for a patch held until the first Tuesday of the following month.

  • Outlook Forms run VBScript even when macros are disabled

    Posted on May 2nd, 2017 at 18:53 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Full story at InfoWorld Woody on Windows.

    Any Outlook Forms experts out there? Can you pass a Form on to an unsuspecting Outlook user and trap them, without the victim having to do something weird, like add the Form to a library?

  • Office non-security patches are here

    Posted on May 2nd, 2017 at 12:49 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    No, you don’t want to install them yet.

    Office 2010

    Update for Microsoft Office 2010 (KB3128031)
    Update for Microsoft Outlook 2010 (KB3191906)

    Office 2013

    Update for Microsoft Excel 2013 (KB3191877)
    Update for Microsoft Outlook 2013 (KB3191889)
    Update for Microsoft PowerPoint 2013 (KB3191871)
    Update for Microsoft Project 2013 (KB3191878)
    Update for Microsoft Visio 2013 (KB3178711)
    Update for Skype for Business 2015 (KB3191873)
    Update for Skype for Business 2015 (KB3191876)

    Office 2016

    Update for Microsoft Access 2016 (KB3178700)
    Update for Microsoft Excel 2016 (KB3191861)
    Update for Microsoft Office 2016 (KB3115501)
    Update for Microsoft Office 2016 (KB3178658)
    Update for Microsoft Office 2016 (KB3178692)
    Update for Microsoft Office 2016 (KB3178706)
    Update for Microsoft Office 2016 (KB3191857)
    Update for Microsoft Office 2016 (KB3191862)
    Update for Microsoft Office 2016 (KB3191867)
    Update for Microsoft Office 2016 Language Interface Pack (KB3191866)
    Update for Microsoft Outlook 2016 (KB3191883)
    Update for Microsoft PowerPoint 2016 (KB3191860)
    Update for Microsoft Project 2016 (KB3191870)
    Update for Microsoft Visio 2016 (KB3191856)

    Thanks to @PKCano!

  • Word 2016 crashes when clicking on the File menu

    Posted on April 26th, 2017 at 12:06 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    A fascinating bug reported by Cave_West on the Microsoft Answers forum:

    Word 2016 is crashing when clicking on the File menu when certain (not all) documents are open…  if we open a document that works (a fresh .docx or any .doc) and while Word is still open try and open a problematic .docx it works.  If we try and open a problematic .docx with Word closed first, accessing the File menu causes Word to crash.  What’s interesting is that it doesn’t seem to be all .docx files, only certain ones, but for the moment we haven’t identified any commonality between the problem files, in fact most are simple documents with no embedded pictures, macros etc.

    Removing the Update for Word 2016 (KB3178720) resolves the issue.

    Anybody else seeing this?

     

  • Non-security Office patches are out. Eight for 2013, Fifteen for Office 2016

    Posted on April 4th, 2017 at 14:04 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Don’t install anything!

    April 2017 Non-Security Office Update Release

  • MS-DEFCON 2: Make sure Automatic Update is turned off

    Posted on April 4th, 2017 at 10:05 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    It’s the first Tuesday of the month. You no doubt know the drill.

    In the next few hours, Microsoft will likely issue a big bunch of “Optional” Office updates. You don’t want to install them. Of course.

    If you followed my directions for installing the March patches, your system is already set to block updates. If you didn’t follow those directions, you should make sure Automatic Update is turned off.

    In Windows 7 click Start > Control Panel. In Win 8.1, press Win-X and choose Control Panel. Click System and Security. Under Windows Update, click the link marked “Turn automatic updating on or off.” Make sure Windows Update is set to “Never check for updates (not recommended).”

    In Windows 10, the situation’s a bit more complex, but I have full details in the InfoWorld article Woody’s Win10Tip: Block forced Windows updates. Short version: With Win10 Pro, bring up gpedit, click Administrative Templates > Windows Components > Windows Update. On the right, double-click Configure Automatic Updates. At the top of the resulting settings box, choose Disabled, click OK, and close out of the Group Policy editor. Reboot and you’re done. With Win10 Home, if you’re on a Wi-Fi connection, set it to metered (see the article). If you’re on Win10 Home and you don’t have a Wi-Fi connection, your options are considerably more complex.

    Let’s wait and see what surprises this month will bring.