• 38 years ago an Apple was born

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    #2420942

    Steve Jobs presenting the first Mac in 1984 – YouTube “Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak and their ingenious team at Apple announced on January 24, 1984, the
    [See the full post at: 38 years ago an Apple was born]

    Susan Bradley Patch Lady

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    • #2420960

      The original Mac, sold for $US2495 in 1984 — equivalent to $US6695 in 2022 — marked a watershed moment in tech history, revolutionizing the way most people interacted with computers.

      A fully loaded MacBook Pro laptop with a 15″ screen may cost now days around $6000, so Macs may be the same or even have come down in price since 1984 after taking inflation into account!

      So when you hear someone complaining about how expensive Macs are compared to Windows PCs, and that is why they are sticking with Windows, just shrug it off and think: “There, but for the grace of Jobs, go I.”

      Ex Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7) since mid-2020. Now: running macOS Big Sur 11.6 & sometimes, Linux (Mint)

      MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
      Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
      macOS Monterey; browsers: Waterfox "Current", Vivaldi and (now and then) Chrome; security apps. Intego AV and Malwarebytes for Macs.

      • #2420964

        Couldn’t afford one then, can’t afford one now!

        cheers, Paul

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        • #2421004

          same boat, although linux distro’s have done/do a good job with a minimal cost outlay (contributions for devs) with self research.

          "-rw-rw-rw-" extreme computing
        • #2421116

          Me too.  I was looking for a new computer in 1984 (my first!), so I went to a large department store that sold the Mac.  I had trouble even turning it on, so I asked for assistance from the store staff, who told me they were too busy.  I eventually discovered how to start it, but could do nothing with it,  Then the price blew me away.

          So I thought, for a lower price, I can get a color monitor with an IBM PC clone instead of the standard black and white monitor with the Mac.

          I was going to buy a Compaq, but didn’t like the mushy keyboard or the price, so I ended up buying a IBM PC with a color video card but originally a composite black and green monitor which I eventually upgraded, 256KB memory (also upgraded to 640KB) and a cheap daisy-wheel printer.  You also had to buy IBM DOS extra.

          This for an obsolete computer.  The XT was $6000-$7000), and the AT (just out – was $10000).  I couldn’t afford that on my meager salary as a computer technician,

      • #2421191

        Hmmm, I guess this is the age of the emojis… I don’t use them, trusting people will pick up on heavily ironical comments, but may be not. Hard to say.

        Ex Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7) since mid-2020. Now: running macOS Big Sur 11.6 & sometimes, Linux (Mint)

        MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
        Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
        macOS Monterey; browsers: Waterfox "Current", Vivaldi and (now and then) Chrome; security apps. Intego AV and Malwarebytes for Macs.

    • #2421002

      That’s ugly, also highlighted elsewhere on askwoody

      "-rw-rw-rw-" extreme computing
    • #2421013

      My first PC was a Mac Plus. Bought it in May 1987 for $1,479, along with an Apple Imagewriter II dot-matrix printer for $495. Since it did not have an internal hard drive, I bought a 20 MG external one for $589. It was called the Photon 20 and made by a company called Warp Nine Engineering. I soon followed up with an external floppy drive as well. I thought the Mac Plus was great and a lot of fun. But it didn’t take long for it to start to seem slow and not-so-fun. I replaced it in Oct 1990 with a 386SX system, which was a huge improvement.

      I eventually got rid of the old Mac Plus at a yard sale about twenty years ago for just $20. It was still in perfect condition. I suppose it would now be a museum piece. Oh well.

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    • #2421067

      Maybe “A Mac Was Born” would be a better title?

      Apple computers were around in the ’70s, more than 40 years ago. They brought graphics to the masses, and in color.

      By contrast the first Mac was monochrome, though it introduced the GUI that opened up computer usage to non-geeks. I’m still not sure that last effect was good all in all. We’ve not reached the kind of positive future portrayed in Star Trek, where citizens walk around talking about wave theory and scarcity is nonexistent, but rather a significantly more dumbed-down reality.

      -Noel

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      • #2421102

        Noel: Well, yes, “Apple” had been around already for a few years. But “Mac” is short for “Macintosh” and that is a particular variety of apple that Jobs liked, so it was and still is identified with the stylized apple with a bite taken off, for example at the back of my laptop’s screen. So “a certain kind of apple was born” would be more correct … But “an Apple was born”, to me at least, seems like a more elegant way to put it.

        And “a Macintosh Apple was born” would be redundant.

        Ex Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7) since mid-2020. Now: running macOS Big Sur 11.6 & sometimes, Linux (Mint)

        MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
        Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
        macOS Monterey; browsers: Waterfox "Current", Vivaldi and (now and then) Chrome; security apps. Intego AV and Malwarebytes for Macs.

    • #2421214

      For maybe ten years I used Macs furnished by NASA, starting in the late 1980s with the two first regular Mac desktop models (not all-in-ones). I employed them as dumb terminals to run jobs in a mainframe, so my use was not exactly demanding. All the same, these two Macs burned their motherboards. So not a great experience. The following desktop Macs were better, but I was still only using them as dumb terminals to do work.

      Finally, in the late nineties, I decided to have my own laptop and after much consultation I decided to buy a Toshiba running Windows 98, because at the time I was mostly working for the Navy and they used 100% Windows PCs. Win 98 was OK. I kept the machine for 7 years, then bought an IBM Thinkpad laptop running XP. It was pretty good, but back in 2005 the size of the internal HD I could get was 36 GB and that meant I had to move on to a new machine in “just” over 6 years. That was an HP running Windows 7, with 3/4 TB HD and 8 GB RAM. Great deal all around.

      By 2017 it was clear that the future of Windows was Windows 10, and I had grown disappointed with how it was handled by MS, having expected as many did, that after the fiasco of Win 8, MS was going to come up with “the next Windows 7 ” — but it didn’t. Not because so much of the OS itself, but because of the fast cadence of upgrades and the bugginess resulting from that and of such things as the show of indifference to the quality of the product, when the QC people got the sack.

      By then I was convinced from talking to several people who were using exclusively Macs for work, that a Mac laptop was, for me, probably the easiest replacement to choose for my Win 7 PC. One thing I liked about Macs was that macOS is close to UNIX and LINUX, which I much preferred to DOS – OS/2 to run jobs from the command line.

      So in June of 2017 I went and bought a Mac, plus Office for Macs and some expensive compilers I need for my work. It has worked out just fine for me. Although it came to over $4K, that was supposed to be a one-time investment on something expected to last many years.

      Now there is the nagging question of how much longer this Mac, with an Intel CPU, is going to be effectively supported by Apple, when there is a new generation of Mac computers coming out with ARM CPUS; and how much longer are the developers of the applications I use going to keep updating and patching them because of that.

      Time, as always, will tell.

      Ex Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7) since mid-2020. Now: running macOS Big Sur 11.6 & sometimes, Linux (Mint)

      MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
      Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
      macOS Monterey; browsers: Waterfox "Current", Vivaldi and (now and then) Chrome; security apps. Intego AV and Malwarebytes for Macs.

    • #2421391

      A walk down memory lane – but first, I know of an art museum that has one of the first (1994) Macs in its art collection. It is the physical design that is important to curators.

      For us, our history of computers at home dates from 1986 and covers more than 11 PCs including an:

      • Epson Equity I desktop purchased in 1986, running MS-DOS 2.11 and GW Basic,
      • Leading Edge Model D desktop purchased in 1986 running MS-DOS 2.11 & GW-BASIC,
      • Compaq Presario 850 tower purchased in 1992 with an Intel Pentium III processor and running Windows Me,
      • Sony Vaio PCV-RS430G tower purchased in 2003 with an Intel Pentium 4 Processor and running Windows XP Home Edition,
      • IBM ThinkPad T40 purchased in 2004 for $1,999.00 with an Intel Pentium M 1.6GHZ processor running Windows XP Professional,
      • Sony VGC-RB30 tower purchased in 2004 with an Intel® Pentium® 4 processor running Windows XP Home Edition,
      • Two Lenovo E20 towers purchased in 2010 for $1,029.99 (each) with Intel Core i3-540(3.06GHz) 64-bit Dual Core Processors running Windows 7 Professional 64-bit,
      • Toshiba Satellite A505-S6985 laptop purchased in 2010 for $799.00 with an Intel Core 3 2.1 GHz Processor running Windows 7 Home Premium,
      • Lenovo ThinkPad Edge laptop purchased in 2011 with an Intel Core i5 Processor,
      • HP EliteDesk 800 G2 tower purchased in 2015 for $912.00 with an Intel Core i7-6700 Processor running Windows 10 Pro 64/Windows 7,
      • HP Envy Desktop 795-0050 Tower purchased in 2019 with an Intel Core i7-8700 Processor running Windows 10 Home 64 (upgraded to pro).

      And yes, we have more then one computer use at the house who have used the machines to write dissertations, professional papers and books, as well as conducting fundamental and quantitative analysis.

      For desk top computers our practice has been to spend about $1,000 per machine with that amount purchasing progressively more powerful equipment over time.

      We still have in storage all of the PCs that we have purchased since 2003.

      And, there is at least one early notebook that I owned but have forgotten.

      At work I started using a Compaq Portable, aka luggable, in 1983 and by 1984 insisted that my staff receive and use IBM personal computers.

      Prior to our PC days it was card punching with deliveries to the computer lab for processing and/or smart/programmable calculators.

      We have come a long way since the introduction of the Mac and IBM personal computers and if I have learned one thing, above all others, related to PC operating systems is don’t mess with Microsoft’s Windows.

    • #2423401

      The original Apple personal computer was the Apple II, not the Mac.

      According to Steve Wozniak, Apple wasn’t making much if any money on the Mac; but they were making tons of money on the Apple II series.  But Steve Jobs insisted on emphasizing the Mac and deemphasizing the Apple II series.  They even came up with an Apple III, which had all sorts of problems, so people didn’t want to buy it.  Woz said that Apple almost went broke as a result of abandoning the Apple II series.  Then lo and behold, Bill Gates of all people purchased a huge amount of non-voting Apple stock, which saved Apple.  (Gates was being investigated for monopolistic practices, and apparently to get the government off of his back, he invested in a competitor.)

      Soon after this, Apple released the iPod, iPad, iPhone, etc., and they are now one of the richest companies in history.

      Group "L" (Linux Mint)
      with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
      • #2423412

        A minor correction: the iPad, etc. came years after the first Mac and also of Gates facing charges of monopolistic action, because of MS wrapping IE around Windows and, allegedly, buying Apple stock to smoke-screen himself from the prosecution. The iPhone, for example, came out in 2007.

        Quite right about Apple II.

        Ex Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7) since mid-2020. Now: running macOS Big Sur 11.6 & sometimes, Linux (Mint)

        MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
        Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
        macOS Monterey; browsers: Waterfox "Current", Vivaldi and (now and then) Chrome; security apps. Intego AV and Malwarebytes for Macs.

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