• 6000005 Registry keys and Group policy info to keep Windows 10 from going to 11

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    #2409829

    Click here to install the Registry key to keep your machine on Windows 10

    Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

    [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate]
    “TargetReleaseVersion”=dword:00000001
    “ProductVersion”=”Windows 10”

    To reset the values at a later time to allow the install of Windows 11– use this registry key which blanks out the Windows 10 Product version entered above:

    Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00
    [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate]
    “TargetReleaseVersion”=-
    “ProductVersion”=-
    “TargetReleaseVersionInfo”=-

    Click here to download the registry key to reset these values

    To use group policy to do the same change (assuming you have Windows 10 professional):

    To use Group policy on Windows 10 to stay on Windows 10:

    If you have group policy on Windows 10 Professional, drill down to Computer Configuration>Administrative Templates>Windows Components>Windows Update>Windows update for business. Look for “Select the target Feature Update Version.” Click to enable it and enter Windows 10 in the box, “Which Windows product would you like to receive feature updates for? E.g. Windows 10.” You can then leave the feature release version blank.  If you would like to install Windows 11 at a later date, just go into the group policy and remove Windows 10.

    Note:  Steve Gibson has posted up a new GUI program that does similarly:

    https://www.grc.com/incontrol.htm

    Susan Bradley Patch Lady

    Viewing 19 reply threads
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    • #2409901

      …Look for “Select the target Feature Update Version.” Click to enable it and enter Windows 10 in the box, “Which Windows product would you like to receive feature updates for? E.g. Windows 10.”…

      Just for added clarity, once you find that exact policy, you will probably need to double click the name of the policy in order to bring up the options and settings shown in the screenshot. Once that is open, then you can click on the circle labeled “Enabled” and proceed with the remaining instructions.

      For me, with Windows 7 Pro and Windows 10 Pro, I’ve always had to double click on the name of the policy to bring up the box/es with the settings options.

      …You can then leave the feature release version blank.

      Did you mean to say the “Target Version for Feature Updates” box??  😉

      Seriously, must’ve been a long night, especially for those caught up in the Exchange server debacle created by an update from MS as detailed by the post on the main blog page here (“Okay Microsoft this is not how to start off 2022”).

    • #2412978

      Susan:

      Thanks for the key. Stay safe.

      BluezMan

    • #2413100

      Clicking the link merely downloads a .reg file.   According to this article from How-To Geek, it’s necessary to double-click the file to modify the Registry:

      https://www.howtogeek.com/382727/what-is-a-reg-file-and-how-do-i-open-one/

      To allow Windows 11 to install, presumably the Registry must be edited to delete the Key:

      [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate]
      “TargetReleaseVersion”=dword:00000001
      “ProductVersion”=”Windows 10”

      Ed

    • #2413238

      I understand Ed’s post about installing the Registry Key – < Windows stay on 10.reg >.

      Later, however, when you might want W11, then what do you do?

      Myron

      • #2413255

        To reset the values at a later time to allow the install of Windows 11– use this registry key which blanks out the Windows 10 Product version entered above:

        Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00
        [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate]
        “TargetReleaseVersion”=-
        “ProductVersion”=-
        “TargetReleaseVersionInfo”=-

        Click here to download the registry key to reset these values

        Just added that to the post.

        Susan Bradley Patch Lady

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2413256

      I still don’t see my post, but I did look further and found this webpage from ASKWOODY and Susan B:

      https://www.askwoody.com/forums/topic/6000005-registry-keys-and-group-policy-info-to-keep-windows-10-from-going-to-11/?mc_cid=8d4291179c&mc_eid=5583484da6

      It tells you what to do, but that means you have to open the Registry yourself.

      Susan said on that page:  ”

      Click here to install the Registry key to keep your machine on Windows 10

      but on my FireFox browser there was no link, just the words.

      Lo and behold, when I visited the above page using Brave, the link showed up, so I have now downloaded the restore registry file.

       

    • #2415965

      Hi Susan
      I am looking for a confirmation on this topic. Your initial text January 2 at 1:22am last paragraph after entering Windows 10 in the box, you state “you can then leave the feature release version blank. This implies it is optional.
      You earlier issued an Ask Woody Plus Alert Issue 18.37.1 2021-09-28 and under Consumer and home users, 2nd para, Last sentence, Click on Enabled, fill in the product version in the first box (“Windows 10”) and then the feature release version you want to keep.
      I have no interest in Windows 11 at this stage and will probably stay with Win 10 until 2025. I have recently used entering the Target Version for Feature Updates and letting Microsoft tell me when ready for download.
      I am ready to go for 21H2 now. So I enter Windows 10 and then 21H2 and wait?. I am not the impatient type when It comes to Microsoft/Windows.
      Thanks in advance for any guidance.
      Bryan Booth(bsqrd)
      Dell Inspiron 15-3567 laptop 8GB memory, 1TB HDD Win10 Pro, Version 21H1 Build 19043-1415

      • #2416024

        “you can then leave the feature release version blank.” This implies it is optional.

        It is optional for the purpose of this topic (“… to keep Windows 10 from going to 11”).

        I am ready to go for 21H2 now. So I enter Windows 10 and then 21H2 and wait?

        Yes (if you want to avoid moving to the next feature release version as soon as it’s released towards the end of this year).

        Windows 11 Pro version 22H2 build 22621.1194 + Microsoft 365/Edge

    • #2418056

      [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate]
      My registry does not have the “WindowsUpdate” option.
      What am I missing?
      Thanks
      Marnolla

    • #2423042

      WindowsUpdate DOES NOT exist in this Registry string (Win10 Home 21H2) on my machine — [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate]

      • #2423051

        The key does not exist by default, you need to add it.
        The easiest is to download  and run the reg file linked in Susan’s first post at the top of this thread.

        cheers, Paul

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2423056

      when i execute Windows stay on 10.reg i get the error Cannot import C:\users\downloads\Windows stay on 10.reg” Error accessing the registry.

      any suggestions.

      • #2423063

        Do you get any other messages before that?
        Are you an admin on your machine? Is it a corporate machine?
        Can you run the Registry Editor? (Win R, regedit, Enter)

        cheers, Paul

    • #2423427

      Thanks Susan

    • #2424252

      Toda Raba is Many Thanks in Hebrew, so toda raba for Windows stay on 10(1).reg
      laksi, ISRAEL

    • #2426899

      regarding Steve Gibson’s InControl app, he has posted updated versions around mid-February 2022. download & run the newest version of InControl from his web site.

      Version History of InControl listed here:
      https://www.grc.com/incontrol/details.htm

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2429549

      Hi, I have:

      Edition: Windows 10 Home
      Version: 20H2
      Installed: 08/18/2020
      OS build 19042.1348
      Windows Feature Experience Pack 120.2212.3920.0

      When I check on the ‘Updates’ to my system, it says it’s up to date.

      Do / should I update to Version 21H2?  If so, HOW?
      I'm pretty good with computers, but this has me baffled.
      Do I also need to iinstall this regedit?  It says that I 
      can't upgrade to windows 11 anyway.
      TIA,
      • #2429557

        Susan recommends version 21H2.
        See AKB6000003.
        To upgrade to 21H2, download the .reg file for that version.
        Double click on the file and give it permission.
        It will change the Registry value to the 21H2 version and Windows Update will provide the upgrade the next time it runs.
        When it is time to upgrade again, you can use the proper .reg file to choose the next version.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2429573

      I am a Windows Desktop technician with corporate experience for about 35’ish years). I have some personally experience running Windows Servers at home (Windows NT/2000/2021R2 and 2016). I only ever had my own “home” domain for about 2 years on Widows 2012R2 – it was just to learn and over kill for a home network server so I got rid of it after about two years.

      I find the best combo to ensure no non-controlled updates occur is GPO for targeted version and Windows Update Blocker for prevention of Microsoft’s aggressive update pushes to avoid “accidental updates installed by Microsoft even when you have precautions in place to stop this from happening” that Microsoft will deny they ever did.

      In earlier versions of Windows 10, when I had windows updates waiting to install for a day or so but never installed them, eventually I would wake up one morning and everything would work perfectly except I could not run an *.exe file — I would click start menu and it all looked like it was working, but I click to open an app (any non windows app that is) and the mouse would go busy like it as opening something but nothing would ever open. SO, I would restart (thereby installing the waiting updates) and after the updating everything worked as per usual once more.

      I questioned this behaviour on an MS forum and was always told it was me or my mistake or something like that but always I was told, “Microsoft does not force reboots for installs and certainly wouldn’t cripple running apps for an update reboot”. However, it happened twice to me, so I invested in Macrium Reflect, a backup software (I take 4 backups per day each to a separate drive on my storage / media server) and I use Windows Update Blocker to just turn of windows update until I am ready to do it. It sets permissions on the Windows update registry keys that basically remove system and user permissions to them so they can’t be turned on by the system or a user “accidentally” AND oddly enough with those two combinations set, Windows 10 has been a pure pleasure to use.

      With the above settings I can completely control Windows Updates at no financial cost.

      My updates are always set to to download but let me chose when to install them, so when I decide it is time to do an update I re-enable windows updates and do them.

       

      Any security update that feels like it applies to me gets installed, other than that I couldn’t care a less about new features (most of the time) as my PC is generally used for play not work – although the PC was used for a combination of work / play for the first 3 years of it’s like with me for the past 3 years it has been 99% play only, my employer pays all of my work PC needs now 🙂

      • #2431307

        When updates are installed and the machine hasn’t been rebooted weird stuff can occur just as you are describing.  I never recommend keeping a machine unrebooted.  Once it installs the update, reboot soon.  Exactly as you describe, weird stuff starts happening.

        Susan Bradley Patch Lady

    • #2431326

      I never recommend keeping a machine unrebooted.  Once it installs the update, reboot soon.

      How can one update without rebooting afterwards ?
      The process of downloading and installing isn’t complete without reboots.
      My PC reboots twice. After first reboot the update process goes to 30% then it auto reboots and continues from 30% to 100% and boots into Windows (I have no password or pin).

    • #2433202

      Susan,

      Do I need to be concerned with this process if Microsoft has informed me that 2 of my Windows 10 machines do NOT qualify for upgrade to Windows 11?

      Thanks for the always great articles.

    • #2433246

      2 of my Windows 10 machines do NOT qualify for upgrade to Windows 11?

      You don’t need to worry.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2433223

      I have set the Windows 10 registry keys/values as described here, but when I go to Settings -> Windows Update, I still see a message telling me that my PC is able to run Windows 11.  Is there a way to stop Windows Update from even detecting eligibility and “offering” Windows 11?  I’ve had some weird experiences with Windows Update not honoring the settings I give it; so far, nothing egregiously bad has occurred, but I don’t trust Windows to respect those settings either, even if they are in the registry.  Is there a way for a Windows Home user to not have Windows Update remind them about Windows 11 every time they need to check for and install current Windows 10 patches?

      • #2433263

        If you are not using bitlocker you can disable the TPM in device manager.

        Susan Bradley Patch Lady

        • #2433286

          Ok ….  Isn’t the TPM a hardware component?  I don’t think I asked about it, but maybe it’s related somehow to Windows Update detecting eligibility for and “offering” Windows 11?  Could you help me understand how?  I don’t think I asked about it in my comment, but if disabling it will get rid of the nagging, I can do that.  I’d just prefer to have a decent understanding of what I’m doing.

          Thanks.

        • #2433763

          Susan,

          I see TPM in my device manager but no ability to disable.  I do have Bitlocker enabled so is this why I have no option to disable?  Do I have to disable Bitlocker first?

          Thank you!

          • #2436800

            I wouldn’t soften my computer’s security by glibly disabling TPM to avoid an upgrade nag.  Tsk, tsk, lol.

            This from Chris Gardner on positekdotnet:

            On the Windows Update page you’ll see a “Stay on Windows 10 for now” link underneath the blue Download and Install button. Click that, and you’ll stop being nagged all the time to upgrade to Windows 11.

            Whether this will continue to work in 2022 or how long it works before you have to do it again, I do not know.  I’m still on Win 7 and dreading the inevitable move to OSaaS on newer hardware.

            I wonder if there is a registry “hack” to report an unsupported version of TPM or complete lack of TPM to Windows Update while maintaining the functionality of TPM 2.0.

          • #2436803

            Yes, BitLocker requires TPM v1.2 or higher.

            • #2436819

              Yes, BitLocker requires TPM v1.2 or higher.

              I don’t know whose question you were answering, but that’s not strictly true as Bitlocker can be used without a TPM:

              Can I use BitLocker on an operating system drive without a TPM?

              Yes, you can enable BitLocker on an operating system drive without a TPM version 1.2 or higher, if the BIOS or UEFI firmware has the ability to read from a USB flash drive in the boot environment. This is because BitLocker will not unlock the protected drive until BitLocker’s own volume master key is first released by either the computer’s TPM or by a USB flash drive containing the BitLocker startup key for that computer.

              BitLocker FAQ

              Windows 11 Pro version 22H2 build 22621.1194 + Microsoft 365/Edge

    • #2454706

      Thank you, and good to “see” you again, Susan (CQ here)!  Mid-June 2022 suggests the game is escalating as Microsoft sees Win11 as ready for general roll-out.  My main objection is forced online sign-in, which binds the user to a unique ID as coughed up via TPM.  The inferior Start Menu (plus inability of adding Toolbar to point to to the legacy Start Menu subtrees via NTFS links) is a functional regression, but at least without exploitable overtones.

      I expected a bun-fight from China and Russia, as those markets forbid TPM in favor of their own solutions, with everyone assuming everyone else will enjoy back-door access to their own <shrug>.  However, it looks like “qualifying” Intel and AMD (ARM?) processors have built-in TPM 2.0, reducing CMOS Settings etc. potentially little more than “security theater”.

    • #2454803

      On disabling TPM; all depends on whether this also disables TPM within “approved for Win11” CPUs, and whether Windows can reach into UEFI and turn it on again.  May only serve to select between motherboard TPM (as a discrete device) vs. CPU TPM support, and such changes may invalidate anything already relying on TPM.

      A client with a new laptop complained he couldn’t save to external storage (USB hard drive and flash drives). Turns out his Windows Home edition had automatically encrypted the laptop’s internal storage following OOBE, with the key held in his online Microsoft Account (yes, he fell for Cortana’s “a little WiFi here, a little sign-in here” vendor UI pressure). That meant he can only save to similarly-encrypted storage, with everything thus dangling on validity of TPM, etc.

      It was up to us to figure that he was encrypted (he didn’t know) and that we could get his key from is online account (which he didn’t intend to have). Certainly forces vendor dependency, and 100% trust in the vendor’s services, etc.  Nasty++, IMO

       

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