News, tips, advice, support for Windows, Office, PCs & more. Tech help. No bull. We're community supported by donations from our Plus Members, and proud of it
Home icon Home icon Home icon Email icon RSS icon
  • A list of good, reasonably up to date books on Linux Mint

    Posted on OscarCP Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Home Forums AskWoody support Other platforms – for Windows wonks Linux for Windows wonks A list of good, reasonably up to date books on Linux Mint

    Tagged: 

    This topic contains 17 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by

     LHiggins 2 weeks, 2 days ago.

    • Author
      Posts
    • #344909 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      I have installed Linux Mint 19 in dual boot with Windows 7 in preparation for next January, and now I have a question I have been unable to find its answer, first by doing a search in Woody’s with it’s “search” feature, and then by scanning the threads in the section, or forum “Linux for Windows Wonks”.

      I am asking for A list of a few good books on Linux Mint, both its GUI (Cinnamon, in my case) and also line commands to install and uninstall applications, update software and other common maintenance and upgrade tasks. It doesn’t much matter if they are printed on paper, or distributed as files in epub, PDF, or some other also most commonly used digital format.

      Any helpful information on this matter will be deeply appreciated.

      I know that things are different with different versions, and books on a particular OS may not apply exactly to releases that came up after the book was written and (maybe) last updated. But a good book could be very useful, and if it is really good, the differences with versions that came out after it did can often be investigated profitably by searching for explanations on the Web.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #344919 Reply

      JohnW
      AskWoody Plus

      There doesn’t appear to be a huge market for Linux Mint books, but a search at Amazon turned up this list of Linux Mint books.

      This looks like the most recent: Linux Mint 19: Desktops and Administration

      I decided to try Ubuntu as my daily driver about 5 years ago, and found an earlier edition of the book, “Ubuntu Unleashed”, was indispensable. Linux Mint 19 is based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS. The latest edition is: Ubuntu Unleashed 2019 Edition: Covering 18.04, 18.10, 19.04 (13th Edition)

      4 users thanked author for this post.
      • #344973 Reply

        Chessie
        AskWoody Lounger

        As you seem to at least be familiar with Linux, could I ask you a question, please, @OscarP?
        Do you know if Linux is compatible with running WordPress websites? I help my husband out with 2 of his WordPress sites and he basically does the content and leaves the rest up to me. I’m feeling rather daunted at the prospect of not being able to use Windows 7 come January. Or perhaps I should be posting this question in a different section of AskWoody.

         

         

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #345050 Reply

          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          Chessie, sorry, I use Linux only for my work, mostly creating (writing, debugging, testing and using) computer programs or editing files I need to use. It involves only plain ASCII files.  I think there is a recent thread already that might be relevant to what you need to know, something about moving from Windows to Linux, probably in “Linux for Windows Wonks.”

          Or you could start a new thread with just your question for a title (limited to 80 characters). In case you have not done this before: the place for creating a thread is at the bottom of the page listing all previous threads in the forum where you want yours to appear. (To get there, click on the name of that forum at the lower end of the brown right side-bar in all of Woody’s pages.) The place to write your first entry, explaining what you need to know, looks like the regular space to write a posting, but there is an additional little space above it where you can also write the tittle. I think that “Linux for Windows Wonks” would be a good place for yours, should you decide to start one. Good luck!

          1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #344926 Reply

      anonymous

      This may help:
      https://linuxmint.com/documentation/user-guide/Cinnamon/english_18.0.pdf

      Note the link is a .pdf

      More documentation, in more languages listed at:
      https://linuxmint.com/documentation.php

      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #344928 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Another, related question I would like to add to the previous one:

      I have looked online for a good text editor for Mint, one can produce good quality “.txt” files and where one can copy and paste text in just about any original format and font, and it will appear in nice plain text in the “.txt” file where it is copied.

      I’ve found articles recommending a number of text editors online, but they were all illustrated with screen-shot examples where, invariably, what was shown were pages of code with different elements shown in different colors. Which is nice, but none of those examples actually showed that one can also have a menu-driven ability to set up and then create plain text in a font and letter size of one’s choice, in plain black type (that can then also be formatted, if one so chooses, as to be in bold, italic, underlined, etc. characters), which is what I am really after.

      I have been writing code practically all my rather long professional life, but ever since I graduated from punched cards to terminals and later to PCs, I have been using things like VI with UNIX and LINUX, or, for Windows, an old 32-bit application called PFE and, either way, dealing only with plain ASCII and nothing else. Seeing colors in code’s lines, as with VIM, is OK, but I can also do just fine without them. Plain “.txt” is my immediate concern. But not something from the command line, such as “VI”, that I use only from coding and nothing else, as it is awkward to use in the manner I have described and, preferably, from the Desktop.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #344941 Reply

        Sessh
        AskWoody Lounger

        I am still messing around with Linux, but if you’re looking for a Notepad-like equivalent for Linux that is just a bare bones text editor, Leafpad is a nice choice and very lightweight. I can’t remember the other one I was using occasionally, but it had colored text that appeared while you were typing programming-type stuff. Leafpad never has colors. It’s a lot like the original windows Notepad only it works properly with no weird formatting/spacing issues.

        Anyway, I don’t know if that’s what you’re talking about, but it’s something. It may turn out to be a whole lotta nothin’ though. 🙂

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #344962 Reply

        JohnW
        AskWoody Plus

        If you want a text editor for writing that will allow you to control fonts and layout, I would suggest LibreOffice Writer. It is a very close clone to MS Word.

        LibreOffice 6 Review

        For the other more technical uses of a text editor for coding, thankfully there is no need to resort to command lines any longer, unless that is what you prefer.

        Check out:

        Visual Studio Code – Code editing. Redefined.

        Atom text editor – A hackable text editor for the 21st Century

        Brackets – a modern source code editor

        Sublime Text – A sophisticated text editor for code, markup and prose

         

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #345012 Reply

        Ascaris
        AskWoody_MVP

        Is there something wrong with Xed, the one Mint Cinnamon comes with?  Code highlighting is optional, and it only applies to code it recognizes.  The actual colors are not part of the text, and are just in the way it renders the text.

        If you’re looking for underlining, italics, and what not, it doesn’t sound like you’re really looking for a plain text editor.  Plain text is, er, plain.

        Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.15.4 & Kubuntu 18.04).

        • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 3 days ago by
           Ascaris.
        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #345047 Reply

          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          Ascaris, Thanks for the information, I’ll look into Xed. I have not got that far as finding what are the applications that came with this particular Mint installation. First I need to learn to use the GUI and, or specific line commands well enough to start unwrapping the presents left for me under the tree: the reason for my initial entry in this thread and why I decided to start it.

          As to “plain”: meaning plain black on white, plus some optional features that would be nice to have as well and are sometimes available. For example, and really useful, the ability of the user to choose the size and type of font. Helps comprehension, reduces eye strain.

          A color-code feature and line numbers? Not so much, unless they are optional, so one can turn them on or turn them off at will.

    • #344945 Reply

      Lugh
      AskWoody_MVP

      O’Reilly is a good resource for tech books and other resources.

      Click on “Books” in left-hand menu if that’s all you want to see.

      Lugh.
      ~
      Alienware Aurora R6; Win10 Home x64 1803; Office 365 x32
      i7-7700; GeForce GTX 1060; 16GB DDR4 2400; 2 x 256G SSD, 4TB HD

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #344967 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Thanks, Lugh.

        I can see that there is a great many Linux books out of O’Reilly! I have a few of those: my first, back in the early-Nineties was “UNIX in a Nutshell” on line-commands, plus, a couple of years later, “Running Linux”, that told me the essentials of writing shell scripts and of doing day-to-day tasks with this OS — and also about a new and strange thing called the World Wide Web”. Who’d ever heard of such a thing? I was familiar with the Internet, as well as with BITNET and ARPANET; but this WWW thing?

        I also got the “Linux Bible” and, from O’Reilly, bits and pieces on “Vi”, “Sed and Awk”, things like that. These are no much help, though, when dealing with the Mint GUI (Cinnamon, in my case). But, with a little help, I know I’ll get there.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #345040 Reply

          mn–
          AskWoody Lounger

          I also got the “Linux Bible” and, from O’Reilly, bits and pieces on “Vi”, “Sed and Awk”, things like that. These are no much help, though, when dealing with the Mint GUI (Cinnamon, in my case). But, with a little help, I know I’ll get there.

          Mind that the “vi” in UNIX books is probably not exactly the same “vi” you find on Linux. On Linux you may get (g)vim, nvi, BusyBox vi, … In particular the more “advanced” operations can work completely differently.

          Which is sort of annoying as I once learned to use the advanced features of commercial UNIX vi …

          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #345053 Reply

            OscarCP
            AskWoody Plus

            Thanks! Fortunately, I mostly use vi for things like exporting text from one ASCII file to another, or looking at several files in succession that have the same string of characters in their names, besides the basic text editing, of course. But, even so, I have noticed that there are differences between versions, as you have pointed out. So far, I have managed to deal with them.

    • #345549 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Thanks all of you for your suggestions and advice. In addition to a number of things I have downloaded using the links provided in some of your entries, I have also bought “Ubuntu Unleashed (2019 Edition) and “Linux Mint 19, Desktops and Administration” recommended by JohnW. With all that, I feel like anyone starting with Linux Mint will have enough to handle the graphic interface (Cinnamon and Mate) as well as how to do various common operations involving accessing the operating system itself (e.g,installing applications, updates, etc.)

      However, my being satisfied with the advice already given here should not stop others from adding their own suggestions, making this thread into a good source of information for those who might consider using, or are starting to use Linux Mint. Particularly now that we are getting ever closer to the end of support for Windows 7, those of us not interested in Windows 10 might have to decide how to move on to some other operating system, Mint being probably a good choice for many who might prefer to give Linux a try.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #345614 Reply

      anonymous

      @YP

      OscarCP,

      I too remember days of cards, JCL, etc! As for editors on Linux, I spend some time myself on this topic. Mostly, I wanted to get Notepad++, windows app, running on Linux. I like Notepad++ because:
      – I’ve been using this since XP days
      – You can record macros
      – Rectangle block selection of text
      – Choose font size, color etc
      – In my opinion, very capable txt or programmer’s editor.

      If you research the web, comments are to install it using snapd, wine, or run in VM. My choice was to run the portable version under wine. It took some experimenting; but basically:
      – I copy Notepad++ folder from windows to Linux; I’m using xunbuntu
      – Delete Plugin Dspell to avoid exception problem. I had Dspell installed on windows
      – Delete Plugin “PluginManager.dll”
      – Install Wine
      – setup launcher (notepad++.desktop) file looks something like

      [Desktop Entry]
      Version=1.0
      Type=Application
      Name=Notepad++
      Comment=Notepad++ V7.5.8
      Exec=wine ‘/home/abc/PortableApps/Notepad++PortableV7.5.8/Notepad++Portable.exe’
      Icon=accessories-text-editor
      Path=
      Terminal=false
      StartupNotify=false
      Name[en_US]=notepad++

      On xubuntu, I just RT mouse click and choose Create laucher to create *.desktop file, which I edit. I also use the default full screen editor “mousepad” that came with xubuntu.

      Something for you to consider

    • #347920 Reply

      Lugh
      AskWoody_MVP

      O’Reilly is a good resource for tech books

      I couldn’t think of the other big tech publisher earlier, just came back to me 🙂

      Wiley

      Lugh.
      ~
      Alienware Aurora R6; Win10 Home x64 1803; Office 365 x32
      i7-7700; GeForce GTX 1060; 16GB DDR4 2400; 2 x 256G SSD, 4TB HD

    • #347932 Reply

      LHiggins
      AskWoody Plus

      I just got a copy of Linux In Easy Steps – Illustrated Using Linux Mint by Mike McGrath.  The 6th edition was published in Oct. 2018 and uses Mint 19 for the illustrations. Seems to be very clear, easy to understand and very colorful. Be sure to get edition 6. You can find it at Amazon.

    Please follow the -Lounge Rules- no personal attacks, no swearing, and politics/religion are relegated to the Rants forum.

    Reply To: A list of good, reasonably up to date books on Linux Mint

    You can use BBCodes to format your content.
    Your account can't use Advanced BBCodes, they will be stripped before saving.

    Your information:


    Comments are closed.