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  • AI generated play

    Home Forums Outside the box Fun Stuff AI generated play

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      • #2348111
        doriel
        AskWoody Lounger

        Hello,
        About week ago, one theatre in Prague played a scenario, which was purely generated by GPT2 AI.

        There was some chcecking mechanism, that allowed to check the output every 11 lines, I think.

        I heard some parts and its quite funny. I find it very interesting. Do you know about something like that happening in your location?

        https://www.svandovodivadlo.cz/inscenace/673/ai-kdyz-robot-pise-hru/3445

        Look at the project website, if you are interested in
        https://www.theaitre.com/

        Dell Latitude E6530, Intel Core i5 @ 2.6 GHz, 4GB RAM, W10 1809 Enterprise

        HAL3000, AMD Athlon 200GE @ 3,4 GHz, 8GB RAM, Fedora 29

      • #2348382
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Doriel, looking around I have found more information here, including links to articles on several art forms where AI has been implemented to produce mostly OK robotically generated work, possibly including theater plays along with other kinds of of literature:

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Artificial_intelligence_art

        Also here, with more details and commentary (by a human writer, I think):

        https://www.intotheminds.com/blog/en/artificial-intelligence-partner-or-substitute-for-the-performing-arts/

        Excerpts:

        More recently, at the beginning of February 2019, the Chinese company Huawei unveils the latest creation of an “in-house” AI: the finalization of Franz Schubert’s Symphony No. 8, a work that has remained unfinished since 1822. The finale is, therefore, undoubtedly, played by an orchestra, but conceived by artificial intelligence. The latter analyzed the first movements of the symphony to create its finale.

        Far from the first realistic paintings created by artificial intelligence, in 2016, an AI copied Rembrandt’s style and created a picture entitled The Next Rembrandt, which takes up the artist’s artistic codes in minute detail.
        But the most impressive one occurred at the end of 2018. In October, an extraordinary auction was held at Christie’s. In between works by Andy Warhol was a new canvas, created by artificial intelligence. Estimated at between $7,000 and $10,000, this painting, entitled Edmond de Belamy, whose signature is none other than the critical mathematical formula of the algorithm in question, finally sold for $432,500.

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2348743
        doriel
        AskWoody Lounger

        Thank you for the “intotheminds” link. Its very interesting reading.
        Recently, there are few interviews on Czech Radio 3 with young artists, that use AI in generating graphics, music, and many more.

        I like classical music, so that unfinished Schuberts symphony is must-hear for me.

        For me, there is no doubt, that AI could really do such things as finishing symphonies or “imitating” atists. Because you can feed the AI with only that artist, the outcome will be good, lets say similar what the artist itself can do. But AI does not have creativity, doesnt it? It only repeats what has been put in it, just different way.
        Does the human mind work the same? Possibly yes, its a biomechanical computer in the end. Not binary but extremely sensitive machine.

        If someone wants to waste some time, he can try https://play.aidungeon.io/ – AI generated game

        Play and create adventures with infinite possiblities, brought to life with one of the most advanced AIs in the world… they say..

        Dell Latitude E6530, Intel Core i5 @ 2.6 GHz, 4GB RAM, W10 1809 Enterprise

        HAL3000, AMD Athlon 200GE @ 3,4 GHz, 8GB RAM, Fedora 29

        • #2348911
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          Doriel: “Does the human mind work the same [as AI]? Possibly yes, its a biomechanical computer in the end. Not binary but extremely sensitive machine.”

          A most interesting question that I believe does not have a good answer, at least not yet.

          For what it’s worth, I suspect that the answer is “No.”

          My reasons for thinking this way are as follows:

          The brain is a vastly more complex system than even the most advanced of today’s supercomputers, with billions of most intricately interconnected processing units, each with a tiny computing capacity (the neuron), while the algorithms generically designated as ‘AI’ run in much simpler computing devices, with much fewer components. This is one practical limitation of AI that I can see, at least for the moment. Maybe in a few more centuries? our distant descendants’ technology might be at the level where making computing devices as complex as the brain might become feasible. Who knows.

          A second reason I have for being skeptical even while considering the far future, is that such things as time, space, and the rest of what Kant called the ‘a priori’ categories that shape what we perceive as ‘reality’ — in an opinion shared these days by philosophers and  scientists who study the mind (and by those who are both) — are actually ’emergent’ categories, useful representations of the actual ‘things out there’ product of the interaction of the very complex brain with the external world (Kant’s unknowable “thing in itself”), a brain that has been shaped by evolution to perceive this world as what we consider to be ‘real’, in order to survive. And, for all that anyone knows, ‘creativity’ could well be one of those emergent properties only something as complex as a human brain can fully manifest.

          An empirical approach to understanding “possibly the most complex object in the Universe” is being followed by two large projects with many scientists from a number of countries participating in them: the US-based “BRAIN Initiative” and the EU “Human Brain Project” :

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BRAIN_Initiative

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_Brain_Project

          While eventually the results from either or both might be valuable for understanding mental disorders and even to find cures for such devastatingly disabling ones as schizophrenia, and might also lead to big advances in computer science, I am pessimistic that it will make it possible to build a sentient AI with a level of intelligence comparable to that of (clever) humans, at least in our lifetimes. On the minus side, it might very well lead to “intelligent” weaponry, one of science fiction’s staple nightmares.

          Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

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          • #2349013
            doriel
            AskWoody Lounger

            The brain is a vastly more complex system than even the most advanced of today’s supercomputers, with billions of most intricately interconnected processing units, each with a tiny computing capacity (the neuron), while the algorithms generically designated as ‘AI’ run in much simpler computing devices, with much fewer components.

            I agree. Computers and devices are sensitive only to electricity. And we have only two states – open/closed. We can add few simple functions – NO, NC gates (normally open, normally closed). And thats it, then we create logic for those gates.
            On the other hand, brain is sensitive to even tiny differences in chemical concentration.
            Too little sugar = bad mood
            Too much salt = thirst
            Too much CO2 = headache
            and lot more! We dont even know!

            I hope you understand my point 🙂 We can never reach the complexity of the brain, we can only immitate. But I quite like what we can create with AI recently. Weapons and military is what Im affraid of.

            While eventually the results from either or both might be valuable for understanding mental disorders and even to find cures for such devastatingly disabling ones as schizophrenia, and might also lead to big advances in computer science

            Some disorders can be actually understood wrong. Who says, that somehow different brain is “bad” brain? Just because he does not understand capitalism or he does not want to cooperate with other, our society marks him as unwanted? That is not the good way, I think. Some most genuis minds were liitle bit crazy. Autists are one of the most intelligent persons in the world – remember Rain Man by Dustin Hoffman? I think that is true. Some people are really disabled, but some deserve great respect.
            I really like
            Split by M. Night Shyamalan
            This movie has tremendous thoughs inside.

            AI cannot compete with human complexity, but its extremely efficient in “small repeating tasks”. Counting into milions and dividing two 20-digit numbers. But we survived for a thousands of years now, computers are few decades here. We will see whats next and Im looking curiously into the future.

            Dell Latitude E6530, Intel Core i5 @ 2.6 GHz, 4GB RAM, W10 1809 Enterprise

            HAL3000, AMD Athlon 200GE @ 3,4 GHz, 8GB RAM, Fedora 29

            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #2349090
              OscarCP
              AskWoody Plus

              Doriel, I mentioned “devastatingly disabling” mental disorders such as schizophrenia. That is not “being differently minded”. That is a terrible thing to happen to a person, as I know from personal and painful observation of people I know. As to autism, high-performing autistics might be seen as “different but OK”, but serious cases of autism are also disabling and a serious burden to families who, for the most part, have to take care of the sufferers, who are unable of take care of themselves. In fact, there is a debate on whether the “autism spectrum” is a meaningful concept at all or merely a way of saying: this things seem related, but we really don’t know what they are.

              Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

              • #2349287
                doriel
                AskWoody Lounger

                Yes you are correct. I know few mentally disabled persons, and its definatelly nothing easy for the family, its very serious.
                AI could help with hearing/seeing problems – some tiny chips could be implemented into brains, but with mind problems, thats a big question.

                Dell Latitude E6530, Intel Core i5 @ 2.6 GHz, 4GB RAM, W10 1809 Enterprise

                HAL3000, AMD Athlon 200GE @ 3,4 GHz, 8GB RAM, Fedora 29

                1 user thanked author for this post.
              • #2349439
                OscarCP
                AskWoody Plus

                Doriel, My own idea is that, perhaps by trying to replicate some of the ways the brain works while developing new types of AI, those working on this might also come up with insights on how the brain itself functions and on how it fails to function that might help find ways to cure, or at least improve substantially, the lives of those afflicted by certain serious mental conditions. As to the other things you mention, some of it is being done already, for example implanting brain electrodes to deliver mild electric discharges to certain parts of it, in order to moderate or stop serious attacks of epilepsy, or to help blind people see with retina implants — the eyes being considered now days to be part of the brain.

                Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

      • #2349084
        wavy
        AskWoody Plus

        I am pessimistic that it will make it possible to build a sentient AI with a level of intelligence comparable to that of (clever) humans, at least in our lifetimes.

        And I am optimistic that it won’t. 😁

        🍻

        Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2349101
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Today, I read in a recent issue of New Scientist, a British publication of science news and commentary belonging to the “Nature” group, that a team at the University of Sheffield in the UK is working on what, according to the writer, might be “the third wave” (or the third paradigm) of AI, consisting in reverse-engineering the brains of insects to build hardware and software to mimic their functions. So: AI as intelligent as some insects, not as humans.

        Insects have tiny brains with a million or so neurons, compared to human ones with billions of them. But insects, in this particular case bees, are capable of a broad range of “intelligent”, flexible behaviors that let them react quickly and often quite effectively when they encounter themselves, often suddenly, in new circumstances. Unlike “second wave” AI, the present one based on multi-layer neural circuits that mimic the human visual cortex and that can be very good at doing the one complex thing they have been trained to do, the concept that has become the dominant one in AI research in this century (although it dates back to the 1960’s one-layer “Perceptron” algorithm that I studied, a decade later, when doing a Masters in Electrical Engineering.)  The first wave was that of the “expert systems”, with software written with lots and lots of “If( this happens) Then/(do this)/End If” code structures.

        This new type of AI is likely to make possible many kinds of semi-autonomous and autonomous, devices, opening a future of very useful robotic machines (cars, drones, etc.) and also a further reason to worry about AI.

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

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      • #2349466
        wavy
        AskWoody Plus

        the eyes being considered now days to be part of the brain.

        A very complex part with algorithms built in for various things needed to survive. Some Birds optics are able to distinguish predator shapes in the air above them. See various optical illusions and how they work to fool the brain/perception part of us 😉

        🍻

        Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
      • #2352840
        lylejk
        AskWoody Plus

        Huge fan of Deep Dream Generator and as a side note, the subject itself was generated (two examples below):

        Fake girl:  http://gimpchat.com/download/file.php?id=38995 (generated by this site)

        DDG Output 1:  https://deepdreamgenerator.com/ddream/5p056h501an

        My edit(Colorful but non-existant):

        Colorful but non-existant

        DDG Output 2: https://deepdreamgenerator.com/ddream/q3ljhcn9oiz

        My edit (Sometimes you just have to clone:

        Sometimes you just have to clone

         

         

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2352843
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          lylejk: Well, the two pictures in your comment are truly impressive, arresting.

          The “this site” link in your comment takes one to a site where one sees two very convincing and detailed color photos, one of a young woman and another of a middle-aged one. A text box in the lower right corner of the screen explains that these “photos” have been created using a GAN, or Generative Adversarial (neural) Network consisting of two interlinked AI (networks) one generating successive patterns the other must identify as true or fake, so they teach each other in a sort of competition:

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Generative_adversarial_network

          The generative network generates candidates while the discriminative network evaluates them. The contest operates in terms of data distributions. Typically, the generative network learns to map from a latent space to a data distribution of interest, while the discriminative network distinguishes candidates produced by the generator from the true data distribution. The generative network’s training objective is to increase the error rate of the discriminative network (i.e., “fool” the discriminator network by producing novel candidates that the discriminator thinks are not synthesized (are part of the true data distribution))”

          By clicking on “1” in the box in the site with the two women’s photos one gets to a tutorial with examples of how one actual photograph of a face can be mixed with that of another of a different person and had its facial proportions, hairstyle, etc., changed to generate the photo of someone totally different from the persons in the original photos. And the morphing is a smooth and continuous process that is there shown as well.

          It would be really interesting to have a brief explanation of how you made your two “edits”: the modern-art painting looking picture at the top of your comment and  the bottom one, that seems drawn with a pencil.

          The mind boggles just trying to imagine all the possible applications — and implications — of this.

          Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

      • #2352888
        lylejk
        AskWoody Plus

        Definitely a good time waster, Oscar.   lol

        As for the people generator site, it will always give you a new “person” each time you refresh site.   I kept the model since I like to apply different effects tot the same model as a comparison situation (do this often when I do renders).   🙂

      • #2352937
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        I mentioned “applications” and “implications” of AI-generated imagery in my previous comment.

        Applications I can think off the bat are: realistic, live-action-like movies with famous dead actors and, or non-existent ones; fantasy movies mixing non-existing but realistically imaged actors, real or otherwise, with otherworldly backgrounds made using advanced animation techniques. Use of realistic persons, or at least their bodies, inside and out, for training by medical workers, police officers, medicine students, etc. Those are a few of the possible positive uses of this remarkable technology.

        Among the less promising implications, now, the not so imaginary or potential, but actual ways of criminals, and plain spiteful, vengeance-driven people, are already attacking others with highly realistic videos of them as actors in off-color movies, or seen abusing children in the privacy of their homes, for example.

        So, about the dark side, such as this abusive use of “deep fakes”, this article from the non-paywalled “Guardian” newspaper is, I think, quite informative:

        https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2020/jan/13/what-are-deepfakes-and-how-can-you-spot-them

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

        • This reply was modified 2 weeks, 3 days ago by OscarCP.
        1 user thanked author for this post.
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