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  • alternatives to Gmail

    Posted on Slowpoke47 Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Home Forums AskWoody support Windows Windows 7 alternatives to Gmail

    This topic contains 15 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  Slowpoke47 2 weeks, 5 days ago.

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    • #1878600 Reply

      Slowpoke47
      AskWoody Plus

      Not sure where to post this question, so I am here in familiar territory as a W7 user.

      Having come to realize the blatant intrusiveness of Google, over the last several years I have been moving away from that behemoth.  I’ve been happily using Firefox and DuckDuckgo.  I use Protonmail, which is free and has default encryption, as an alternate email host, but I’d like to add a second host for email.

      I’m looking at Kolab Now Kolab Now | Home page and Fastmail Fastmail: email on your side – neither is free, but not expensive either.  Both promise no data collection.  Does anyone here use either of these?  If so, what are the pluses and minuses?

      Slowpoke (group B)

    • #1879377 Reply

      Paul T
      AskWoody MVP

      I use Fastmail – have for years. It’s always been great and has some other features I use – aliases, file hosting. Works via Thunderbird, browser, Android app…

      If I was starting again I would only have one email host and use aliases provided by that host.

      cheers, Paul

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1879379 Reply

      Microfix
      Da Boss

      Slowpoke, I don’t use any of the email host services that you have mentioned but, a while ago I came across a web article which will more than likely help in your quest for a secondary privacy/security orientated email service.
      The restore privacy site has a Secure Email article that opens up many avenues for consideration. Hope article this helps.

      ********** Win7 x64/x86 | Win8.1 x64 | Linux Hybrids x64 **********

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #1880169 Reply

        Slowpoke47
        AskWoody Plus

        Thanks for the link- I actually came upon and bookmarked this page myself last week.  Lots of good info there.  As a non-tech user, I’m sometimes buffaloed by some of the terminology, but this page couldn’t be clearer.

        Currently working on a shift to Linux in lieu of W10, partly to avoid forced telemetry.  Long since abandoned Chrome and Google Search for the same reason, but stayed with Gmail due to inertia.  Now well into a new book, “The Age of Surveillance Capitalism,” by Shoshana Zuboff, that lays bare the rapacious nature of Google’s “services.”  Not easy reading, but a real eye-opener.  Turns out, Google (and others) collect every bit of personal info, including email texts.  They don’t stop there, but use algorithms to tailor search results and predict what a given user will do in the future, and sells the info to advertisers (i.e. their customers).

        I’ll be saying goodbye to Gmail in the near future!  I actually think that paying for a service such as email is preferable to so-called “free.”

        Slowpoke (group B)

        • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 4 days ago by  Slowpoke47.
    • #1879408 Reply

      mn–
      AskWoody Lounger

      Well there’s always GMX … free and reasonably private once you manage to get to the settings and turn on IMAP and use that to access your mailbox, and do searches on the client side. (Webmail has ads and search that can be tracked.) Downside, apparently still no multi-factor authentication…?

      Oh and that’s under the German regulations so a bit stricter than even some others in the EU.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #1880171 Reply

        anonymous

        I have used gmx,com (not gmx,net) and do not want to talk them down. Only I’m not sure that German ownership of what used to be mail,com means that US operations are maintaining strict German standards for customers in the United States.

        I do not have hard facts, just mentioning it is a complex subject. If your security needs are important more investigation may be needed.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #1880179 Reply

          Slowpoke47
          AskWoody Plus

          A quick look at gmx.com and the words “enhanced by Google” leap off the screen.  This is likely no less intrusive than gmail, see my response to Microfix above.

          Slowpoke (group B)

          • #1881526 Reply

            mn–
            AskWoody Lounger

            Actually, according to the terms and applicable regulations, GMX can’t transfer any content data outside their own system. So it’s one degree of isolation and they can’t correlate it with any services offered by other companies, and the “Enhanced by Google” part only applies to the web interface.

            As in the web interface that you need to use for approx. 2 minutes once to turn on IMAP etc.

            So due to sheer scale, as of right now GMX cannot be quite as intrusive as Google… unless/until GMX too starts to offer search engines, advertising networks and such and gains significant market share in them.

            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #1881883 Reply

              Slowpoke47
              AskWoody Plus

              Thanks for your suggestion and interest.

              The further I read into the above-mentioned book (by a well-credentialed author), the more apprehensive I get re Internet intrusiveness, Google in particular.  The founders, Page and Brin, as well as the current CEO, Eric Schmidt, have a policy of willful lawlessness and obfuscation and basically thumb their noses at the FCC, etc., in their efforts, hugely successful, to amass Croesus-like piles of money while bathing themselves in sanctimony.  They are dedicated to the cause of invasiveness because, at the outset, Google was going under before they developed this strategy.

              Since I’ll be starting over with a new email host, I don’t want even the hint of a Google connection, as the history is full of sites that have been sucked up by the Google onslaught.

              Slowpoke (group B)

              1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #1890762 Reply

              Lugh
              AskWoody_MVP

              the above-mentioned book … the current CEO, Eric Schmidt

              Be aware that some of the info in the book is considerably out-of-date, especially when measured in ‘internet years’. Schmidt hasn’t been Google CEO for 8 years.

              My favorite sentence from the book:
              “But the lessons of that day had not yet been fully tallied when fresh answers—or, more modestly, the tenuous glimmers of answers as fragile as a newborn’s translucent skin—rose to the surface of the world’s attention gliding on scented ribbons of Spanish lavender and vanilla.”

              When I checked the book out some months ago, I was very unimpressed. In the sample I got, there was no tech, no economics, no politics—and the writing quality was quite poor. It read like a self-published magazine article or blog—but for hundreds of pages.

              So make sure you have your critical hat on if you continue to wade thru it in the hopes of learning something either credible or useful.

              their efforts, hugely successful, to amass Croesus-like piles of money while bathing themselves in sanctimony

              If any big USA public business isn’t trying to do that, the shareholders will fire the management team very quickly. It’s the basis of Capitalism in the US.

              at the outset, Google was going under

              I followed Google & similar closely in the 90s & 00s. They were never in any danger financially, does she claim otherwise in the book? Not that it matters, but Page & Brin were initially against building advertising into the search—the lightweight text-only early offerings were a compromise between the two internal camps.

              Google (and others) collect every bit of personal info, including email texts.  They don’t stop there, but use algorithms to tailor search results and predict what a given user will do in the future, and sells the info to advertisers

              I recall interesting debate 20 years ago re how much info an online business should request from a customer. Like most public companies, Google’s priorities changed in 2007 when the founders lost control of the company after the IPO. Informed investors are often much more understanding about things like product, service, customer—whereas the general shareholder population, especially major institutions, are mostly only interested in one measure. ROI.

              Perhaps you and others with similar views could buy shares and tell the companies that profit isn’t the only thing, they can go back to the old pre-Capitalist ways. Anyway, good luck in your quest.

              Lugh.
              ~
              Alienware Aurora R6; Win10 Home x64 1803; Office 365 x32
              i7-7700; GeForce GTX 1060; 16GB DDR4 2400; 1TB SSD, 256GB SSD, 4TB HD

            • #1891119 Reply

              Slowpoke47
              AskWoody Plus

              The identity of the current Google CEO is not as noteworthy as their balance sheet.  Do you think that Google became one of the highest-capitalized companies in the world by giving away services?    And what made Zuckerberg filthy rich?  Their true customers are their advertisers, no surprise or indignation there.  And, as you say, the book I cited is truly “thick” reading, in fact I’m not completely through it as of today.  But the most telling passages are quotes from Schmidt and the other former (or, current) CEO’s who make no secret of their increasingly invasive algorithms for scarfing up and interpreting the least bits of personal info while the subjects remain in the dark.

              Others can do as they see fit, of course, but for my money I don’t care to be stalked.  I never got on the Facebook or Twitter bandwagons, just never felt the need or had the interest.  As time goes by, I’m increasingly glad I avoided them.

              Here’s some evidence that I’m not alone in my sentiments:

              Alternatives to Google Products (Complete List) | Restore Privacy

              Slowpoke (group B)

              • This reply was modified 3 weeks ago by  Slowpoke47.
              2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #1892153 Reply

      Slowpoke47
      AskWoody Plus

      Thread starter here- I’m starting a tryout of Fastmail.  So far, looks reasonably intuitive.

      Slowpoke (group B)

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1893782 Reply

      Lugh
      AskWoody_MVP

      Do you think that Google became one of the highest-capitalized companies in the world by giving away services?

      Of course.

      And what made Zuckerberg filthy rich?

      Same as Google.

      quotes from … CEO’s who make no secret of their increasingly invasive algorithms for scarfing up and interpreting the least bits of personal info while the subjects remain in the dark.

      I assume you now see the contradiction in this.
      Same with Zuckerberg as it happens, from day 1 he seemed proud of his stance that privacy is a quaint old habit.

      I guess I should have made clearer that none of this is new. Ancient tribes knew everything about you via proximity; in medieval times the feudal system kept tabs; modern methods of tracking people remotely took off after WW2.

      What every big company hoping to stay in business does today is merely the early 21st century version of an age-old practice. It’s more difficult to opt out these days if you pay taxes or drive a car or have a bank account.

      Billions seem content to put up with nosey neighbors or junk mail or spam or browser ads, in return for the free services. Who’s to say they’re wrong?

      Lugh.
      ~
      Alienware Aurora R6; Win10 Home x64 1803; Office 365 x32
      i7-7700; GeForce GTX 1060; 16GB DDR4 2400; 1TB SSD, 256GB SSD, 4TB HD

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1894438 Reply

      Slowpoke47
      AskWoody Plus

      Who’s to say they’re wrong?

      I speak only for myself, others are on their own.  But I choose to avoid prying where possible.  Fastmail is not free, but I like the tradeoff.

      Unquestioned that we live in a world dominated by marketing- it’s ubiquitous, not limited to the cyberworld.  Also generally successful- if we define marketing as an effort to sell you something you might otherwise not buy, you could even say, wildly successful.  And the level of consumer debt stands as testimony.  It has always caught my attention that US GNP statistics regularly cite consumer spending as about 70% of the total, and government policy, whether red or blue, has been an outspoken cheerleader for more- “Show your patriotism, buy something!”

      But Google, Facebook, et al have taken manipulation to a whole new level.  Kindly include me out, thanks.

      Slowpoke (group B)

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1894445 Reply

      Berton
      AskWoody_MVP

      As far as the subject line is concerned, a couple of “freebies” that seem to be good are the E-Mail client included with the SeaMonkey browser and Vivaldi browser which also offers an E-Mail address.  Another is OE Classic, reminiscent of Outlook Express.

      Before you wonder "Am I doing things right," ask "Am I doing the right things?"
      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #1894459 Reply

        Slowpoke47
        AskWoody Plus

        As far as the subject line is concerned, a couple of “freebies” that seem to be good are the E-Mail client included with the SeaMonkey browser and Vivaldi browser which also offers an E-Mail address.  Another is OE Classic, reminiscent of Outlook Express.

        Thanks, I’ll keep them in mind if Fastmail is not to my liking.

        Slowpoke (group B)

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