• And, yes, Microsoft has given itself permission to install Win10 version 1809 on any Win 10 PC that “Checks for updates”

    Home » Forums » Newsletter and Homepage topics » And, yes, Microsoft has given itself permission to install Win10 version 1809 on any Win 10 PC that “Checks for updates”

    Author
    Topic
    #221023

    Obvious conclusion: If you’re running Win10, don’t click “Check for Updates.”
    [See the full post at: And, yes, Microsoft has given itself permission to install Win10 version 1809 on any Win 10 PC that “Checks for updates”]

    7 users thanked author for this post.
    Viewing 16 reply threads
    Author
    Replies
    • #221024

      You pretty much want to keep your head in the sand and never “check for updates” on windows 10.  You can do the POSH way (which reminds me need to type that up) but unless you are positively absolutely certain you know what will be installed, don’t “check for updates”.

      Susan Bradley Patch Lady

      7 users thanked author for this post.
      • #221172

        I mentioned a few weeks ago that some new Windows 10 PCs that I was setting up wouldn’t get on the network (and therefore the internet). I believe the trouble occurred for those PCs when I specifically told them to check for updates. If I let them do the initial check that happens without your telling it to, then they had no problem; but if I then told them to check for updates, the result would be that they would no longer connect to the network.

        To fix the problem, I did a clean install of 1709 on each of these PCs. Once I did that, I could then connect to the network. The clean install was effortless; I inserted the 1709 install disk that I had created from the ISO file, ran the SETUP file on the disk, and told Windows to do a clean install without preserving anything. As I recall, I chose “Custom Install”, formatted only the Windows partition, then told it to install Windows on that same partition. Everything was automatic from that point forward; I didn’t have to make any further choices. Once the process finished, the PC was in new, “out of the box” condition, and I was able to connect it to the network without any issue.

        It shouldn’t be this hard. A non-IT user will not easily figure this stuff out, if they can even figure it out at all. Perhaps this is a clue or a confirmation that Microsoft has, in fact, decided to abandon the retail and small business market and concentrate on the big business market. The reason I say that is because a big corporation will have their own IT staff who will be able to figure these things out; but a small company (or a home user) will not have an IT staff; they are on their own, and they will likely get stuck if they tell Windows to “check for updates”; they won’t have a clue how to fix something like that.

        Group "L" (Linux Mint)
        with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
    • #221028

      Please tell me Check for Updates does not override deferral policies now. I’m pretty sure it has been respecting them.

      Here’s a PowerShell script to list settings and, optionally, updates:

      https://www.mcbsys.com/blog/2015/03/updated-powershell-script-to-show-windows-update-settings/

      But it might be easier (and GUI-er) to just run wushowhide (you don’t have to hide anything):

      https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/3073930

       

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #221033

        I don’t know – and I’d be very interested in finding out.

        I tried “Check for Updates” on a Surface Pro 3 running 1803. Didn’t get bit.

        Yet.

      • #221039

        If you have a deferral in place “seeking” won’t install 1809  — with one exception — we have had several instances in the past where Microsoft has screwed up and their detection rules were faulty and people who had deferral policies in place/not behind WSUS got the feature release.  So while yes I can say that deferral policies should hold, I can go back in history and point to where they didn’t always work as advertised.

        Susan Bradley Patch Lady

        7 users thanked author for this post.
      • #221041

        No, it does not – at least not on my 1709’s. I ran WUMT and checked for updates and found a Defender definition update and that’s it.

    • #221034

      I would be REALLY REALLY surprised if it would override the deferrals. But then, it wouldn’t be the first time MS policy would surprise me.

      ASUS PRIME Z270-K * Intel Core i7-6700 * 2 x 8 GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 2133 MHz * Aorus Radeon RX 570 4GB * Samsung 840 EVO 250GB SSD * SanDisk Ultra 3D 1TB SSD * DVD RW Lite-ON iHAS 124 * Creative X-Fi XtremeGamer PCI * Windows 10 Pro 21H2 64-bit
    • #221035

      Aside from the usual jibber jabber/hogwash of MS updates on the whole, love your reference to WC Fields. When there is crazy in the world of IT/End User/and all other, it’s always nice to get a glimpse of the reality of a once upon a time fantasy movie take on life. Thanks Woody. Thanks Patch Lady.

      MacOS, iOS, iPadOS, and SOS at times.

      6 users thanked author for this post.
    • #221037

      I am a seeker. A terrible one.

      Dell desktop with Win 10 home. I checked for updates a few hours ago, and the upgrade wasn’t there. I then used Windows 10 Update Assistant, and it appears to have worked (after an hour of re-re-re-re-boots). I am now on 1809 (OS Build 17763,1).

      Still fiddling with the computer, but it seems to working fine.

      I always check for updates (twice/day). If there is a cumulative update or other update that automatically re-boots my computer, I want to watch the process. Thus, if something goes wrong, I might see an error message or some other issue, and can at least know it was caused by the update.

      I must make people cringe with this “seeking” behavior.

      I am a terrible Win 10 user.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #221048

        Nah. I think you spelled ‘fearless’ wrong. Adventurous maybe. Possibly compulsive, but I’m not a professional. Thanks for the brief report. Let us know if you find any hiccoughs along the way.

    • #221049

      And, yes, Microsoft has given itself permission to install Win10 version 1809 on any Win 10 PC that “Checks for updates”

      No, Microsoft didn’t need to do that. We all gave Microsoft permission for automatic updates without additional notice when we installed Windows 10 and agreed to the Microsoft Software License Terms (EULA).

      See Settings, System, About, Read the Microsoft Software License Terms, section 6.

      Windows 11 Pro version 22H2 build 22621.898 + Microsoft 365/Edge

      • #221050

        We can revisit the subject of plain language. See H. Dumpty.

        The remainder of Carroll’s quoted lines:

        “The question is,” said Alice, “whether you can make words mean so many different things.”
        “The question is,” said Humpty Dumpty, “which is to be master— that’s all.”

        (same source, Wikiquote)

        Microsoft claims mastery of words.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #221069

        Are you talking about the permission I gave Microsoft to install Feature Updates to my Windows 10 installation before or after Microsoft upgraded my Windows 7 PC without my permission?

        • #221088

          Yes. (Neither.)

          Windows 11 Pro version 22H2 build 22621.898 + Microsoft 365/Edge

      • #221089

        If Windows 10 is installing 1809 even with feature update deferrals enabled if someone presses Check for Updates, which hasn’t yet been confirmed, AFAIK, I’d say that’s Microsoft giving itself permission.

        Otherwise, your post, b, as much as I want to refute it, is the actual answer to Woody’s statement that he does not know how Microsoft gets away with this.  They get away with this because people know that Windows 10 does whatever it wants (whether the EULA explicitly allows it or not), and they use it anyway.  At some point you have to stop being surprised when it happens again, and again, and again…

        If you don’t like the documented behavior of 10, you can either tolerate it or make what may be some hard choices for a lot of people.  I’ve migrated to Linux (with Windows 7 in a VM that I plan to continue to use well past its expiration date if necessary), and so have a few others here, and still more have gone to MacOS.  Most, though, grit their teeth and tolerate it, just as Microsoft no doubt predicted they would.  As long as Windows 10 keeps increasing in market share, even if it is going a lot slower than they had hoped, there’s no reason to change what they’re doing.  I hate it, of course, but as Gone to Plaid would say, it is what it is.

        Dell XPS 13/9310, i5-1135G7/16GB, OpenSUSE Tumbleweed
        XPG Xenia 14, i7-1165G7/32GB, OpenSUSE Tumbleweed
        XPG Xenia 15, i7-9750H/16GB & GTX1660ti, OpenSUSE Tumbleweed

        3 users thanked author for this post.
        • #221164

          MS gets away with it, because, according to their very well publicised plan, it is what is Supposed To Happen!

          1809 is now Ready For Installation, according to MS evaluation. This may or may not coincide with YOUR evaluation.

          Edit: Removal of slander

          • #221448

            The question I believe Woody was asking rhetorically (about how MS gets away with this) isn’t about whether this is what Microsoft believes is “supposed” to happen.  Quite clearly, we have seen that this MS takeover of people’s computers is, in fact, very much their plan.  The question is one of how a company can so egregiously usurp control of computers that do not belong to them and have people accept it.  My point is that people each have a choice, and when they choose to give in and use Windows 10, they have accepted it, even if they do it angrily.  MS doesn’t much care if people are satisfied Windows 10 users… just being a Windows 10 user, full stop, is adequate for their needs.

             

            Dell XPS 13/9310, i5-1135G7/16GB, OpenSUSE Tumbleweed
            XPG Xenia 14, i7-1165G7/32GB, OpenSUSE Tumbleweed
            XPG Xenia 15, i7-9750H/16GB & GTX1660ti, OpenSUSE Tumbleweed

      • #221081

        No we didn’t, @B, no matter how much you want to believe that. 🙂

        • #221095

          It’s not possible to install Windows 10 without agreeing to its License Terms.

          Windows 11 Pro version 22H2 build 22621.898 + Microsoft 365/Edge

      • #221130

        Not true. I just downloaded and read (!) the 6,000-word Windows Software Licensing Terms, updated June 2018. The closest thing I found to being forced into an early upgrade is this:

        6.    Updates. The software periodically checks for system and app updates, and downloads and installs them for you. You may obtain updates only from Microsoft or authorized sources, and Microsoft may need to update your system to provide you with those updates. By accepting this agreement, you agree to receive these types of automatic updates without any additional notice.

        That doesn’t say anything about me clicking “Check for updates,” or becoming a seeker. It also doesn’t mention that, in the Pro version, I can proactively prevent updates.

        Microsoft has clearly overstepped its bounds.

        Post coming in Computerworld.

        9 users thanked author for this post.
    • #221061

      Well, this should be an interesting experiment to see how well this Windows Update Blocker utility works – making sure that the Windows Update and related services stay turned off instead of ‘magically’ turning themselves back on again after a certain time (or whenever MS feels like it).

      Between Windows Update Blocker and O&O’s ShutUp10 I have a very difficult time trying to get Windows Update to work when I actually want to do updates. I get a blank white screen with ‘Windows Update’ at the top and nothing else until I do a lot of ‘fiddling’ with both of these utilities – usually with a couple of reboots thrown in for good measure.

      I have Windows 7 Professional and Windows 10 Home in a dual boot (W7 installed first) so at least if anything bad happens to W10 I can still use W7 until I sort it out. I have the ISO’s for 1809 downloaded and put onto USB sticks (64bit for the main PC and 32bit for my old HP laptop) so when I get time I’ll give 1809 a try – on spare SSD’s, of course.

      If I replace the 1803 version of W10 Home with 1809 on the main PC I wonder if W10 will acknowledge the fact that I have W7 on there already and I want a dual boot? When I installed 1803 a while back W10 decided to ignore the W7 I already had on there and I could only boot into W10 after I’d finished  (“Oops, sorry – we made another mistake”).

      Then I had to use EasyBCD to restore the dual boot which was quite easy to do, thank goodness.

      PC1: Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 11 Home 21H2 64bit.
      PC2: Asus H81M-PLUS Motherboard, Intel i3-4160 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 11 Home 21H2 64bit.

      • #221063

        The answer, once you’ve gotten a system into a state where it just won’t update, is not to try to do “automatic” updates at all any more. Just go to the catalog and download and install the latest cumulative update for your flavor of Windows.

        -Noel

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #221066

          Thanks, Noel.

          I think the difficulty (if one may call it that – some may say not being able to get updates for W10 is a great thing) may be caused by Windows Update Blocker.

          By default, it only disables and ‘protects’ the Windows Update service but someone on Sordum’s (makers of WUB) discussion page recommends also disabling these other related services – “Delivery Optimization”, “Windows Update Medic Service”, “Update Orchestrator Service”, “Windows 10 Update Facilitation Service” and “Background Intelligent Transfer Service”.

          These extra services (and any others you wish to disable and ‘protect’) can be added to the configuration file for WUB so they are disabled and ‘protected’ as well. Which is what I have done.

          The problem with getting Windows Update to run when you want to is that some of these services do not seem to be ‘restored’ correctly when you turn them back on with WUB. I notice Windows Update Medic Service stays disabled for starters. This service cannot be disabled by normal means. It can be disabled with WUB but if it doesn’t turn back on after disabling WUB you still can’t turn it back on normally (“Access is denied”).

          After doing a bit of fiddling around (including running the Windows Update troubleshooter) as I mentioned in my previous post Windows Update does run again eventually but I might just go with your catalog suggestion from now on.

          PC1: Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 11 Home 21H2 64bit.
          PC2: Asus H81M-PLUS Motherboard, Intel i3-4160 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 11 Home 21H2 64bit.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #221151

            Absolutely right. If you use WUB, be sure and use it to disable only Windows Update Service. If you add the other services, it completely disables them and you can’t get them turned back on. I had to restore from an image to get back to where I could even use Windows Update.

            3 users thanked author for this post.
            • #221236

              OK, well I took the plunge and did a clean install of 1809 Home Edition (as a dual boot with my Windows 7 Professional). I had Macrium Reflect images standing by just in case.

              – did the install with the PC disconnected from the Internet as I usually do. No Candy Crush, Bubble Witch, March of Empires or any of the other stuff appeared that I don’t want. I notice the install paused for a couple of minutes after the first or second reboot, I think it was trying very hard to find an Internet connection. Then it asked me TWICE if I would like to connect so Windows could more easily set up apps for me (or words to that effect). Yeah, right. I don’t think so.

              – Windows 10 still didn’t acknowledge the fact that I wanted a dual boot with Windows 7, same as what happened with 1803. Fixed with EasyBCD again. I noticed that I could actually do this from within Windows itself but EasyBCD allows me to rename the boot entries (Windows 7 to Windows 7 Professional and Windows 10 to Windows 10 Home).

              – The Windows 10 chipset and other drivers which I had for 1803 seem to work well (so far) with 1809, can’t see any updated drivers on the Gigabyte website at this time.

              – the only updates available at this time were updates  for Windows Defender which I’ve downloaded and installed. I have now activated Windows Update Blocker with just the default entry in it’s .ini file. The default entry actually disables and ‘protects’ the Delivery Optimization service, not the Windows Update service but I notice the WU service is disabled and presumably ‘protected’ as well. I did a test by switching WUB off again and Windows Update works properly straight away (thanks, bobcat5536).

              Anyway, back to the grind of reinstalling the rest of my programs that I had in 1803. I’m posting this message in Pale Moon from 1809, btw.

              PC1: Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 11 Home 21H2 64bit.
              PC2: Asus H81M-PLUS Motherboard, Intel i3-4160 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 11 Home 21H2 64bit.

              1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #221062

      Installed version 1809 via Windows Update with no issues; now testing some of the 225 improvements.

      Windows 11 Pro version 22H2 build 22621.898 + Microsoft 365/Edge

      • #221079

        You don’t have the Task Manager CPU issue? 😀

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #221085

          Ah, I hadn’t gotten around to trying that. Yes, it appears I do have the Task Manager CPU issue (and the associated “Arrows to expand “Background processes” in Task Manager are blinking off and on”).

          Windows 11 Pro version 22H2 build 22621.898 + Microsoft 365/Edge

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #221097

        Is not turning the ****** apps running in the background again after restart that appeared in 1803 one of them?

        I just disabled all of them via Group Policy, but it would be nice to be able not to choose only between zero or all of them…

        ASUS PRIME Z270-K * Intel Core i7-6700 * 2 x 8 GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 2133 MHz * Aorus Radeon RX 570 4GB * Samsung 840 EVO 250GB SSD * SanDisk Ultra 3D 1TB SSD * DVD RW Lite-ON iHAS 124 * Creative X-Fi XtremeGamer PCI * Windows 10 Pro 21H2 64-bit
    • #221064

      This is getting to be just plain amazingly confusing to this old person. Maybe everybody here should take a deep breath, hold it, hold it, hold it some more, then let it out sloooowly and see if after that everyone can possibly get, and stay, on the same page?

      Thanks!

      Windows 7, Group B… and by the looks of it right now, with a “forever W” in my future, come January 2020.

      Ex-Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7); since mid-2017 using also macOS. Presently on Monterey 12.15 & sometimes running also Linux (Mint).

      MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
      Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
      macOS Monterey; browsers: Waterfox "Current", Vivaldi and (now and then) Chrome; security apps. Intego AV

      • #221181

        Yes, Oscar; it IS confusing; and not just to regular folks, but to IT professionals as well.

        Group "L" (Linux Mint)
        with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
      • #221856

        Oscar, I believe you’re feeling – as many of us are – that the pace of 6 month OS replacement intervals is simply frenetic and wasteful.

        All we can do is keep calling for a lengthening of that update cycle to a more reasonable time, such as 3 years (which made Microsoft billions and a high tech force on the planet), but such a change is clearly against their current goals. I’m not going to say I’d accept 1 or 2 years, but hey, that would be a tremendous improvement.

        -Noel

        • #222291

          Noel Carboni wrote:
          I believe you’re feeling – as many of us are – that the pace of 6 month OS replacement intervals is simply frenetic and wasteful.

          +1
          Yep, IOTTMCO.

          Really too bad Microsoft didn’t settle on the names “Bi-annual Channel” and “Bi-annual Channel (Targeted)” for updating. Then they’d be able to switch from _too-frequent twice-per-year Feature Updates_ to _more-stable-and-more-fully-baked once-every-other-year Feature Updates_ and, to save management face, just blame all previous issues on the programming team misunderstanding the executive team’s brilliant vision… 😉

          https://www.dictionary.com/browse/bi-annual

    • #221068

      For those that installed without issues, congratulations, however don’t sing victory yet, Errors and issues usually appear the following weeks after install,

      (why do you think Microsoft gives you 30 days to go back to a previous version?)

      I hope and pray that your systems run smoothly without issues.

      Just someone who don't want Windows to mess with its computer.
      • #221086

        (why do you think Microsoft gives you 30 days to go back to a previous version?)

        The rollback period was reduced to 10 days a couple of years ago (since version 1607 Anniversary Update).

        Windows 11 Pro version 22H2 build 22621.898 + Microsoft 365/Edge

        4 users thanked author for this post.
        • #221100

          Sorry for my mistake,  well, still my points remains, just don’t be surprised if something weird happens

          Just someone who don't want Windows to mess with its computer.
          • #221111

            Actually, as a home user with Pro version I have kind of accepted the idea of forced updates and telemetry – let the others test for me in typical scenarios in millions od different configurations :).

            It might be annoying for prosumers with specific needs (that there’s no QA team testing the software, like Noel keeps pointing out) or people that have Home version installed (and are being guinea pigs for those that paid more) – but as long as I have deferrals and they work – let it be that way :).

            ASUS PRIME Z270-K * Intel Core i7-6700 * 2 x 8 GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 2133 MHz * Aorus Radeon RX 570 4GB * Samsung 840 EVO 250GB SSD * SanDisk Ultra 3D 1TB SSD * DVD RW Lite-ON iHAS 124 * Creative X-Fi XtremeGamer PCI * Windows 10 Pro 21H2 64-bit
            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #221114

              when I used to have windows 7  I ACTUALLY HAD turned on automatic updates and let windows do whatever they wanted with my computer, I didn’t have an issue with that

              However Update reliability have decreased and there’s like 60% chance it will mess your computer.

              Just someone who don't want Windows to mess with its computer.
              1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #221861

              What worries me most is that if one chooses to “just go along with it”, what functionality might one lose in the future because of unilateral decisions by Microsoft?

              I for one don’t want Windows to turn into macOS or Microsoft to turn into Apple. Not even a little bit. A dumbed down, “we think for you” future doesn’t strike me as good.

              We’re already seeing the state of the art stagnate. Where does it go from here?

              -Noel

            • #224034

              I for one don’t want Windows to turn into macOS or Microsoft to turn into Apple. Not even a little bit.

              At this point, I think that would be an improvement.

              MacOS is a desktop OS designed to be used with a keyboard and mouse.  It makes no compromises to accommodate touchscreens (that I am not using) or the like.  It’s just a straight-up desktop OS designed to be as coherent and consistent as possible.  Like versions of Windows prior to 8, MacOS was designed to be the best desktop OS possible.

              Now, whether it actually accomplishes the excellence it strives for is a matter of opinion, and not one I can speak authoritatively about, since I’ve not used a Mac since the SE/30 (which was a current model at the time).  A Mac still knows what it is, and what it is not (a phone or iPad), though I am dismayed to learn that despite Tim Cook’s statements that there are no plans to converge iOS and MacOS because it would result in compromises that make it an inferior experience for both (yes! yes! precisely this!), they are in fact working on bringing iOS apps to the Mac, which will naturally mean that devs will just make an iPhone app and consider the Mac “covered” without ever optimizing it for the Mac’s much greater screen size, storage space, performance, and superior pointing ability.

              I’d always loathed Apple for precisely the reasons you cite.  I don’t need everything dumbed down to protect me from having to consider the computery inner workings beneath the surface.  It’s why I’ve always preferred Windows, from my first real exposure to Macs (again in the 68030 days, ~1990) and Windows alike (Win 3.0) until very recently.

              With Windows being what it is now, though, a Unix-based platform that is stable, whose updates actually get tested before release, that has a UI designed for machines that have large screens, a discrete keyboard and mouse, lots of storage/GPU power/RAM/CPU power (relative to handheld devices), and that don’t try to conscript my PC into the Microsoft army, sounds very appealing.  The choice we’ve always had in the Windows world, as opposed to the “you’re holding it wrong” world of Apple, is rapidly disappearing.  If I am not going to get a choice, I would rather that “one true way” of doing things be oriented to my actual usage pattern (large screen, mouse, keyboard) than one that isn’t relevant to me or even to the OS maker (MS having given up on mobile, yet they still insist on the mobile-first design).

              Of course, then there’s option 3, Linux…

               

              Dell XPS 13/9310, i5-1135G7/16GB, OpenSUSE Tumbleweed
              XPG Xenia 14, i7-1165G7/32GB, OpenSUSE Tumbleweed
              XPG Xenia 15, i7-9750H/16GB & GTX1660ti, OpenSUSE Tumbleweed

            • #224045

              The old Macs – roughly prior to 2005 – truly were dumbed down machines. They were incredibly easy to use, but you could only do those things that Apple wanted you to be able to do; anything beyond that was quite difficult.

              The new Macs – roughly post 2005 – are COMPLETELY different machines and I would contend not dumbed down at all. While I don’t have the technical chops of Mssrs Carboni or Ascaris, I’m quite sure that anything one can do in Windows can also be done in MacOS. One may need to do things a bit differently on a mac than in Windows, but that would be expected since they are different operating systems. Some things will be more easily done on a Mac and others will be more easily done in Windows.

              The macOS is based on Linux, so if you’re a fan of Linux, you should be right at home on a Mac. I’m often surprised at just how similar the macOS is to my Ubuntu 16.04 LTS.

              I think it may be more difficult to customize Mac hardware than it is a PC, so that might be a drawback for some. There may also be some software compatibility issues.

              Finally, time is money, and I spend my time on my Mac actually being productive as opposed to worrying about the how to handle the next batch of Windows updates. My productivity on my PC has plummeted in recent years, almost exclusively due to the update fiasco.

              My Mac just works. My Ubuntu 16.04 LTS PC just works. I’ll never go back to Windows after EOL for WIN 7.

              Just one person’s opinion.

              2 users thanked author for this post.
            • #224161

              Please stay on topic. This is not about MacOS, but about MS installing 1809 on any PC that “Checks for updates.”

    • #221071

      Hey Y’all,

      I’m a little late to the party but I’ve checked twice now Yesterday & Today (just past mid-night) and no forced update with these settings:

      DellXPS8700-WinUpd-Adv-Settings

      This is my test machine that I just did an Image on the boot drive before checking.

      FYI: I cleaned up the code and output for the PowerShell script linked in 221028 if you’re interested let me know and I’ll upload it to OneDrive and post a link.

      HTH 😎

      May the Forces of good computing be with you!

      RG

      PowerShell & VBA Rule!
      Computer Specs

      Attachments:
      • #221184

        RG, I made my setting changes in Group Policy, not in the Control Panel areas. When I tried to disable Sleep via Control Panel / Power Options, my setting would never stick. But when I disabled Sleep in Group Policy, my setting stays the way I set it. I therefore do as many setting changes in Group Policy as possible.

        Group "L" (Linux Mint)
        with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #221056

      Somehow, Microsoft seems to have lost contact with reality (and for sure its customers) completely. The arrogance is infuriating. It’s just waiting until it all collapses.

      Edited for content.

    • #221083

      Microsoft has given itself permission to install Win10 version 1809 on any Win 10 PC that “Checks for updates”

      Not on my Win 10 devices, it hasn’t. The Borg doesn’t yet consume all.

    • #221120

      Windows 10 Enterprise LTSC 2019 downloaded and installed, everything looks good.

      Now I’m gonna enjoy being trouble free and pestered for another 2 years.

    • #221139

      Woody, They get away with it the same way Google and Mozilla do — and the average user does not check for updates. Microsoft is a Bilderberg bully and nobody cares.

      • #221157

        There is still a difference between being able to choose one of 20 browsers, all of which will be perfectly usable for browsing the Web and Windows’ monopoly on the PC market in most areas, as well as between crashing your Web browser and not being able to start your PC.

        ASUS PRIME Z270-K * Intel Core i7-6700 * 2 x 8 GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 2133 MHz * Aorus Radeon RX 570 4GB * Samsung 840 EVO 250GB SSD * SanDisk Ultra 3D 1TB SSD * DVD RW Lite-ON iHAS 124 * Creative X-Fi XtremeGamer PCI * Windows 10 Pro 21H2 64-bit
        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #221159

      “The party’s over
      It’s time to call it a day
      They’ve burst your little balloon
      and taken the moon away.”
      –Nat King Cole

      Carpe Diem {with backup and coffee}
      offline▸ Win10Pro 2004.19041.572 x64 i3-3220 RAM8GB HDD Firefox83.0b3 WindowsDefender
      offline▸ Acer TravelMate P215-52 RAM8GB Win11Pro 22H2.22621.674 x64 i5-10210U SSD Firefox106.0 MicrosoftDefender
      online▸ Win11Pro 22H2.22621.819 x64 i5-9400 RAM16GB HDD Firefox108.0b7 MicrosoftDefender
    • #221790

      Microsoft seems to have tricked me – defender said updates were a week old so I went into defender and updated definitions……….the next thing I knew I’d gone from 1703 to 1803. When the reset happened the metered connection toggle was set to off so I set it back to on but it looks like windows is taking me from 1803 to 1809 all in one day – set to metered connection – using my mobile data without ever “checking for updates” and having every privacy setting locked down.

      • #221817

        Still on 1803 but getting message box  in the taskbar with a red “!” – “Your device is missing important security and quality fixes.”

        “2018-09 Cumulative Update for Windows 10 Version 1803 for x64-based Systems (KB4464218) Status: Pending download”

        ‘Conexant – MEDIA – 3/28/2018 12:00:00 AM – 8.66.88.50 Status: Pending download’

        “Updates are available. We’ll download them when you are not using a metered connection, or you can download 419.41 MB using your current data connection (charges might apply). You might still need to connect to unmetered Wi-Fi for some updates.”

        *****Why do they care about my data management now after they just forced a large OS update on me on a metered connection? And if I press their “download” button does that make me a seeker for 1809?

        So much winning :/

        • #221851

          That’s a weird KB to get hung up on.  KB 4464218 is the one that fixes the Intune bug in the first cumulative update in September.

          I’m concerned about you getting upgraded from 1703 to 1803 over a metered connection. Any idea what triggered that?

          • #221908

            All I can think of was updating the defender definitions but isn’t it strange they moved me to 1803 rather than 1809? – *shrug*

            ps I only have mobile internet so I’m really careful about keeping things set to metered and all privacy settings locked down as far as is possible with win 10 home.

            I’m thinking about investigating the more aggressive 3rd party update blocking apps/scripts now.

             

          • #224019

            10/12/2018 Got the message again in notifications “Update virus protection” Virus protection is out of date. Tap or click to update Windows Defender Antivirus.

            (This reminds me when WIN 7 MSE had problems updating around the GWX push and seemed to use virus (non)updates as a stick.)

            I won’t be updating definitions this time lest I’m identified as a seeker again.

            -Win10 home, privacy settings all locked down, metered connection always on-

    Viewing 16 reply threads
    Reply To: And, yes, Microsoft has given itself permission to install Win10 version 1809 on any Win 10 PC that “Checks for updates”

    You can use BBCodes to format your content.
    Your account can't use all available BBCodes, they will be stripped before saving.

    Your information: