• Any new ways to prevent Win10 Home automatic updates?

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    #2084358

    Woody’s Defcon 2 alert today once again strikes fear in my heart. Unless there’s something new, I haven’t found a way to control when Windows 10 Home updates. Setting WiFi connections to metered has no effect. (Though, interestingly, I have to turn it off in order to update the Office Suite.) And if I leave my computer unattended for any relatively short period of time, MS is likely to start the update without my being able to delay it. Usually at the least opportune time.

    Grrr…  good thing I made an OS image the other day.

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    • #2084404

      In settings > Update & Security > pause updates for 7 days or advanced options > select date, you can pause updated op to 35 days.

      Win 10 home - 22H2
      Attitude is a choice...Choose wisely

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2084431

        Thanks Miedman. (And not a moment too soon. The update window just popped up!) Is that a new option? I’d read that some user control was on the way, but didn’t realize it had filtered down to the Home version.

    • #2084419

      You don’t say what version of Windows Home you have, that will lead to guesses by respondents.

      As far as new ways, if you have 1903 or 1909 you can delay the updates for a short time.

      As far as old ways, those remain the same.

      1. Totally disconnect from the internet (WiFi included) and stay that way.
      2. Upgrade to Windows Pro
      3. Upgrade to 1903 or 1909
      4. Third party software

      #1 isn’t practical if you want to use the internet.

      #2 cost varies, $99 is advertised

      #4 Easy to use programs like Stopupdates10 allow you total control.

      1 click stop, 1 click allow. There are many other 3rd party programs out there.

      The pundits on Askwoody suggest item 2&3, they don’t recommend software not from Microsoft to do this task. Clicking on #4 link will take you to the download page on Oldergeeks.com for that program, it works for me. Scroll to bottom of page.

      HTH

       

       

      3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2084432

        The pundits on Askwoody suggest item 2&3, they don’t recommend software not from Microsoft to do this task. Clicking on #4 link will take you to the download page on Oldergeeks.com for that program, it works for me. Scroll to bottom of page.

        I also use third-party update blockers for my Windows 10 installations (on my Swift and G3), even though they are not in regular use.  If I do decide to boot 10, it’s because I want to check something or do something right now, so hours of updates deciding to start while I only intend to be in 10 for five minutes could be really annoying, as would be the choice of “Update and restart” or “Update and shut down” but no update without shutting down option.  One way or another, I am not going to wait for Microsoft to relinquish control of my PC, so it’s better to block updates than to force the PC off and risk messing something up.

        I don’t really need the update blockers as much as I used to, though, for these infrequent excursions into Windows 10 land.  I’ve shrunk the Win 10 partitions to the point that there’s only a few GB of space in each one, so the massive upgrades won’t stand a chance of working.  I think of it as a serendipitous side effect!

        Dell XPS 13/9310, i5-1135G7/16GB, KDE Neon
        XPG Xenia 15, i7-9750H/32GB & GTX1660ti, KDE Neon
        Acer Swift Go 14, i5-1335U/16GB, KDE Neon (and Win 11)

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2084433

        Sorry about not specifying the version. I figured it would be obvious, since I hadn’t been able to avoid updates, that I was on the most current version (1903).

        And, yes, I’ve been debating springing for the Pro version. There was some reason other than the cost that I didn’t want to do it – but of course I don’t recall what it was.

        Thanks everyone. Potential disaster averted (for now).

        • This reply was modified 4 years, 1 month ago by greenbergman.
        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2084517

      Setting WiFi connections to metered has no effect.

      Under “metered” setting click on “Set a data limit…” > Set Limit.

      Mine set to Monthly, 0, no Unit – seems to be the default.

      cheers, Paul

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2084684

        The default (which I haven’t touched) is set to Monthly, with nothing entered for the Monthly Reset Date, 0 for Data Limit, and nothing entered for Unit.

    • #2084518

      Additionally, under “Windows Update” > Advanced options, there is a toggle for “Dopwnload updates over metered connections…”. Ensure it’s Off.

      cheers, Paul

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2084576
      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2084703

      https://www.majorgeeks.com/files/details/wumt_wrapper_script.html

      I use this to delay Windows updates

       

      I use this to actually disable/prevent auto updates on Win10 Home edition

      btw, WUMT wrapper script is now called Sledgehammer

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2084737

      I have 1909 in Win 10 home, set up the new PC over the holidays and voila! 1909 came down the chute! Therefore, Windows update is on Pause for max amount of days.

      Win 10 Home 22H2

    • #2085578

      I have used “pause” and “metered” and it did prevent updates from automatically installing.

      What I miss about Windows 7 is the ability to read information about the update .. like size, date it was published, etc.  I also used to like to install one update at a time… so… the restart for one update at a time, allowing the system to pricess the update after completion for a while before moving on to the next update.  It was easier to isolate problems with any update.

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