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  • Aren't these the greatest performances of classical music?

    Posted on OscarCP Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Home Forums Outside the box Fun Stuff Aren't these the greatest performances of classical music?

    This topic contains 100 replies, has 12 voices, and was last updated by  OscarCP 3 hours ago.

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    • #2120210 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      It’s been a slow day, and suddenly, as it nears its end, I ‘ve had this idea of “Classical Music” being a topic for a new thread in “Fun Stuff”. Well, as I said: slow day.

      Now, I don’t expect this topic to set Woody’s on fire (although one never knows here.) But one discussion earlier on gives me a glimmer of hope this shan’t be a totally wasted effort. That conversation I just mentioned was completely off topic, but maintained enthusiastically by several of us, until KP blew her whistle and the concurrence adjourned sine die and in a hurry (although Wavy made up for that, to some extent, by starting a thread on PDQ Bach, also in “Fun Stuff”.)

      To open up proceedings, besides choosing a hard-hitting title I hope will provoke some people to react at all, here are two links to an equal number of not very long performances by good musicians, posted on YouTube. They are among my favorites, and the many ecstatic comments and their two million-plus views each might give some support to that. If you dare go in there, then make sure the Ad Blocker is fully on, so you can enjoy all the beautiful notes, chords and melodies without having to consider toilet cleaning products as well.

      This first one is 24 minutes’ long and remarkable for the beautiful and sensitive playing, but more than that, also for the fact that, unlike what is common practice when playing chamber music, the two performers not only do not have the score in front of them, to help stay in sync, but the cellist keeps his eyes shut pretty much throughout, so it is up to the pianist to watch him, now and then, to keep both going together. And without doing a lot of watching, at that:

      This second example is 17 minutes’ long and is from the breakout album that brought its then sixteen-year old performer to world attention and marked the start of her brilliant international career, one she is still at with continuing success. For more reference, she is a Virginian and hails from that state’s Appalachian Piedmont, in the USA.

      I have recordings of this particular piece by some of the greatest performers of the XX Century, some still alive and playing today, some, sadly, no longer so on one, or even both counts. And of transcriptions for several different instruments, some scored by the likes of Brahms and some played by artists with names like Andrés Segovia on guitar, for example. However, this is my own favorite recording, because her playing is so simple, so clear and, well, so right. The way perhaps, as the old saying goes, “Angels play Bach to God (and Mozart to each other)”:

      OK, the deed is done, now let’s wait and see if anything more ever happens here. I still might be pleasantly surprised, who knows.

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    • #2123912 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      By the way, for anyone wondering what “arpeggione” means:

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arpeggione

      (I discovered the arpeggione watching “Whisper of the Heart”, a Studio Ghibli movie. That, in turn, lead me to learning about this sonata by Schubert – quite a famous one, but I had missed it completely until then.)

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    • #2123993 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      If there are some videos of classical performances you, gentle reader, would like to share with us loungers and anonymous visitors here, that would be definitely very good of you — and even outstanding!

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    • #2124033 Reply

      anonymous

      A Suggestion for this topic.

      According to this site http://www.classicfm.com/discover-music/instruments/piano/best-pianists-ever/

      “There’s a strong case to be made for Vladimir Horowitz to be crowned the greatest pianist of all time.” and one of the most fun pieces to play ( as in Difficult ) is Lizst’s Hungarian Rhapsody #2. The two together fix this topic

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v95I6kGghmk

       

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    • #2124066 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Thanks, anonymous, for that link. Horowitz was indeed a great pianist, although he declined noticeably at the end of his career. But when he was good, he was very great.

      I must say my favorite is Arthur Rubinstein, who kept playing flawlessly until he retired when he was already in his late eighties. By then he was practically blind. Someone asked him how he could manage to play so well when he could not see well enough what he or the conductor were doing and he answered: “Well, I still can hear the orchestra and know where all the keys are in the keyboard.” Second in my list: Martha Argerich. She is still at it, also well advanced in years, and keeps intact the extraordinary ability to play, those passages that allow for it, at supersonic speed but with perfect articulation. (Someone once commented that she must have a cerebellum the size of a watermelon hidden under that still magnificent head of hair).

      These links are for: (1) a long, complete recording of a historic concert given by Rubinstein in Moscow in the 60’s and (2) another, in the 70’s, playing Chopin’s Piano Concerto No. 2. He is considered, to this day, to be the greatest of Chopin interpreters of the last century and, perhaps, ever (Chopin does not count, because he was not really an interpreter of Chopin, was he?) (3)  Martha Argerich playing the Liszt Concerto No. 1, with her Argentinian – Israeli childhood friend Daniel Baremboin conducting, at the Albert Hall, during the 2017 BBC Proms in London. Look at her acknowledging, deservedly, an orchestra player that rarely, if ever gets any accolades, at the end of the concert…

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8K4ZwA2nQqI

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T_GecdMywPw

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=geA2Ih-GLLo

       

       

       

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      • #2124131 Reply

        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        I love Martha Argerich’s piano playing.

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    • #2124125 Reply

      Fred
      AskWoody Plus

      True, many older performers are so great; for me Willem Mengelberg, conductor, was very inspiring to many.

      After all.. Just because we're paranoid doesn't mean they aren't out to get us.
    • #2124132 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Hi Fred! Did you get to hear him conducting at the Concertgebouw, or was he there before your time? He was a great artist. I remember listening to recordings of his work on the radio, when I was a skinny young student doing my first engineering degree. Beethoven, Strauss, I am sure it was some of it. It was a long time ago… As it is made clear by watching this video:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XJvZie_E2dE

      Now here is a perhaps a little better sounding example:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0TS85g2JnpA

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    • #2124337 Reply

      woody
      Da Boss

      Fred asked me to post this:

      memories
      OscarCP
      When you graduated, I was in high school, a little younger. Willem Mengelberg was punished shortly after the war by the puritan Dutch community for his views on society during the Nazi period 1933-45. (Was he the only one who thought so? In the 1920-30s it was modern to think so; also the royal family and notables in society did). He became a very bitter man and withdrew from the Netherlands, and then lived his life in his house in Switzerland. His much younger beloved (the only lady?, misstress?) Miss Van Eeghen was with him for a long period and was very often in Switzerland, and of course this was a social scandal in the Netherlands and was kept silent by historiography.
      The last years of her life, in the early 1980s, she was looked after by her younger nephew Jan van Eeghen in the Van Eeghenstaat in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. At this time Jan van Eeghen (a technical engineer) was a retired sports friend of mine –and a co-director of the Amsterdam Jeu de Boules Bond (the Pétanque competition sport)-. After the death of Jan’s favorite aunt in about 1986 I inherited a few things, including her large collection of classical music records under the condition that they should never be allowed to be sold. This collection also contained many old and original signed recordings (78rpm) of the Concertgebouw Orkest and Willem Mengelberg from before the 2ndWorldWar. That is the time that I started to appreciate this music from him so much.
      A few years after the death of his aunt, Jan finally moved to France to continue living among friends in a better and Mediterranean climate (in terms of weather, culture and lifestyle). Unfortunately I lost contact with him, and I became an unknown but “very important” I.T.-security&privacy-specialist, hahaha. I very much regret this loss of contact and friendship, but now it’s too late. It always is.
      In the new CD era I passed on the inherited record music collection to someone who was really crazy about these older music recordings; but my heart is still there. I also passed on my other music records, lack of space and time, and analog recordings was out. Oh dear, new is always better, is it not?
      In contradiction to my non-keeping of the old analog music I have always been very critical of this newer digital future, hence my previous professionalized interest in security and privacy in the computing industry.
      Old versus new, oh boy, what will the future bring? “Franz Kafka” in civil administration has started to become normal (again). “George Orwell’s 1984” is all around, freedom and civilization are being minimized or killed. The west of the Netherlands will drown for shure, just like many other parts of human civilization. Here the ice and snow {as I knew in my youth, see the painter “Hendrick Avercamp (1585-1634)”} in the wintertime have already disappeared, the summers are already getting warmer; drinking water from the major rivers is decreasing, etc.
      The earth will survive for the next billions of years; but will humanity survive?

      Tulips and greetings from cheesy Holland
      Fred

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      • #2124370 Reply

        Fred
        AskWoody Plus

        thanks Woodytulips-flowers-plant-beauty-59987

        After all.. Just because we're paranoid doesn't mean they aren't out to get us.
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    • #2124396 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Now that Fred’s comment has been finally brought to see the light of day — and a very fine comment it is! I am moving on with something I have been wanting to bring to this thread.

      The cello, of all stringed instruments and maybe of all instruments, with its register in the same range as human voice, can be made to really speak, most movingly, by a gifted musician.

      Here, two examples of the power of this instrument in the hands of perhaps the most gifted of cellists ever to walk this world: more gifted than even Pau Casals, in my opinion, and that is the highest possible praise I can think of for anyone who has played the cello.

      First, the “Kol Nidrei” of  Max Bruch.

      Kol Nidrei is spoken at the solemn opening of the service of Yom Kippur, the Jewish Day of Atonement, with these words:

      Light is sown for the righteous

      וּלְיִשְׁרֵי לֵב שִׂמְחָה

      u-l’yishrei lave simchah

      and for the upright in heart—joy

      Please pardon the sins of this nation

      כְּגֹֽדֶל

      kih goh-dell

      in accordance with the greatness

      חַסְדֶּֽךָ

      chas’dechah

      of Your lovingkindness;

      וְכַאֲשֶׁר נָשָֽׂאתָה לָעָם הַזֶּה

      vih ka’ashare nahsahtah la’am hazeh

      and as You forgave this people

      מִמִּצְרַֽיִם וְעַד הֵֽנָּה:

      mee-mitzrayim v’ad haynah

      from when it left Egypt until now.

      וְשָׁם נֶאֱמַר

      v’shahm ne’emahr

      And there it is said:

      Congregation says three times:

      וַיֹּֽאמֶר יְהֹוָה

      vah-yoe-mare adonai

      And Adonai said

      סָלַֽחְתִּי כִּדְבָרֶֽךָ

      sah-lach-tee kid’vorecha

      “I have pardoned [them] as you have asked”

      And here is the player of this ghostly work by Bruch, a player of whom we only have now also a ghost of the recorded sound, but never to be forgotten by those that love hear music well played, with great depth of feeling and a most delicate nuance at the same time:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X1Tx8CvYxjU

      And here in a coincidentally named piece by Offenbach that, played by a lesser musician, could be just a treacly over-sentimental nothing, but here is made to speak to the soul with great charm and power: “Jacqueline’s Tears”

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1pmBJLI4kVw

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      • #2124485 Reply

        Fred
        AskWoody Plus

        Thank you OscarCP, I get your point.

        Both parts Jacqueline du Pré is playing unique here, her “Tears” will live on.  In the coming days I will try this to play at a proper stereo. For common computers and phones are killing this quality of music.

        💪👍👌 Fred

        After all.. Just because we're paranoid doesn't mean they aren't out to get us.
        • #2124488 Reply

          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          Fred, I use a decent pair of headphones plugged into my laptop and the result is very, very good. In my Mac I also run an application Nathan Parker told me about called “Boom 2”, that lets one choose the type of sound enhancement one wishes to have and, or set the frequency response of the audio system that one prefers. Even with the OK but not great little speakers of the Mac, the improvement is quite remarkable. I imagine that there may be something like that for Windows too. Either way, with the headphones I manage to hear very clearly all the instruments over the whole audible range, in stereo. Harps and percussion, in particular, that tend to get their sound muddied and even lost in the sound of a full orchestra with the smaller speakers, come out loud and clear with the headphones. A different type of improvement should be possible, although I have not tried this, by connecting good external speakers to the PC or Mac. Maybe this is what you mean to do? Anyway, all the best with that, hoping you will appreciate better what you can hear better.

           

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          • #2124490 Reply

            Fred
            AskWoody Plus

            Of course, yes and okay; but it remains an approach to how the music is meant. And with a tear I had to think back to the time that I could regularly come to the Great Hall of the Concertgebouw in Amsterdam, thanks to a passepartout from a very friendly person.
            Your hints and links are more than worth paying with more attention to it than the more usual commercial rim-ram music.
            The “electronic improvements” in pc’s, loudspeakers and music still remain a tool that is not always very good to the original; is my humble opinion (without having become a vynyl fanatic now)

            🙂

            After all.. Just because we're paranoid doesn't mean they aren't out to get us.
    • #2124491 Reply

      Alex5723
      AskWoody Plus

      Thank you OscarCP, I get your point.

      Both parts Jacqueline du Pré is playing unique here, her “Tears” will live on.  In the coming days I will try this to play at a proper stereo. For common computers and phones are killing this quality of music.

      💪👍👌 Fred

      I used high-end Audeze headphones with my laptop. Switched to a 2+1 Logitech Z623 THX.
      Sound is great.

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    • #2124498 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Taking a break from wrestling with some software I am coding and that is being really very uncooperative, right now, I’ve had the idea, after I answered Fred, above, to listen to some Beethoven, in particular his string quartet No 15, the penultimate of his five last quartets. These five pieces, in the opinion of musical scholars, well-informed critics, people who like to give opinions on anything and, of course, my totally unfounded but very own one, are some of the most extraordinary ever composed in the whole of the Western classical repertoire. And for a big heap of good reasons:

      When he wrote them, Beethoven was completely deaf, could not hear anything at all. He was also in great despair, not the least because the world he lived in was going backwards politically and the new, great, fraternal society of free and equal citizens promised by the French Revolution clearly was never going to happen. He was also sick, mostly alone, and his own death was not far off. But the music he composed even so, had not only, and understandably, passages full of a deep melancholy, but also passages of transcendental serenity and others evoking a kind of profoundly serene joy. But for all that, they were intensely disliked in his time by many musicians and critics (*), because they were a radical departure from what people expected to be played in a concert of chamber music. It took another fifty years for the then musical innovators, the avant-garde of that day, to realize that they had been scooped by someone long dead, half a century before.

      Here is maybe the greatest and best loved — although any difference in quality between them is a matter of personal preference: they are all very great works of art. Here in two different, but, in my opinion, both excellent interpretations, one quite recent, one much older.

      The new one, by (I believe) students or recent graduates of the New England School of Music (or maybe of the NE Conservatory of Music) Shame the notes provided when it was posted in YT say nothing about this group:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zyDs0wb3FAE

      And the older one, by the great Quartetto Italiano:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2bfOc9z8b5E

      (*) But not by all: “Upon listening to a performance of the Op. 131 quartet, Schubert remarked, “After this, what is left for us to write?”:

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Late_string_quartets_(Beethoven)

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    • #2124702 Reply

      Alex5723
      AskWoody Plus

      Bloch Prayer from Jewish life – Camille Thomas, violoncelle Beatrice Berrut, piano

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nxfg-6Mkh_0&feature=youtu.be

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      • #2124706 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Thanks for this clip. It gives a hint as to where “clesma” (‘klezmer’) music comes from, does it not?

        Ernest Bloch, a composer that deserves to be remembered better, in his day was regarded “as one of the best Swiss composers in history”:

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ernest_Bloch

        (In case anyone is wondering: I have some good old friends that are Jews and am curious, so I ask.)

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    • #2124752 Reply

      wavy
      AskWoody Plus

      https://youtu.be/2bfOc9z8b5E

      🍻

      Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
    • #2125009 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=13ygvpIg-S0

      And, with apologies to Wavy, I am posting now one more sample of late Beethoven, one that he had meant to be the final part of the quartet I posted above, yesterday as of this writing.
      It is the “Große Fuge”, the Great Fugue — the most “out there” thing he ever wrote (as far as I know) and one of the justly most famous works in his late output and a landmark in the development of the string quartet as a musical form (or so I am told). He was totally deaf, as already noted, and his agent, somehow, persuaded him to replace it with the “Andante alla Marcia” (means. more or less, “moving at a fast marching-band pace”) last movement that is now there and so it is played in the two videos.

      To cut the discussion short, before Ludwig’s short-fuse got to the powder, the agent suggested making the to-be-excised movement be made into a standalone, one-movement work for a quartet of string musicians, and maybe also the name to call it, as a fugue takes a a good part of this piece. Ludwig said: “OK, I’ll do that.”
      The agent was right: people paid good money to listen to the quartet, but not so much to the GF. But not let those concert-goers of long ago poor sense of what is good music fool you. This one is a really great piece worth a good listening.

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      • This reply was modified 2 weeks, 4 days ago by  OscarCP.
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    • #2125033 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      OK, I may be on a roll here. Got most of the Beethoven comment in, just maybe 25% missing!

      So I am now adding this little something by J.S. Bach, played by Arthur Grumiaux, one of the maybe six or seven top violinists of the last hundred years. Also, for your greater pleasure, the video shows the score of the piece, turning its pages when the violin plays the last note of the one in view, so you can practice on-the-fly music reading while listening to the notes being played:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lpe7thXd69E

       

       

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    • #2125042 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      And before the well runs dry and my luck comes to an end, here is some Smetana for you, played by the Slovak “Gimnazija Kranj Symphony Orchestra” with some unusual stage decoration and great patriotic enthusiasm, precisely what the musicians, writers, sculptors, etc. of the Romantic movement were big on. This is the composer’s most popular symphonic poem: “The Moldau”, and one can hear the great river being born quietly at his source, run as wild white water further down, slow down to flow on, at a mature pace, through villages, towns, cities and finally reach, broad and serene, the end of its course.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l6kqu2mk-Kw

      And, when it comes to patriotism expressed in music and song, it does not get more patriotic than Sibelius “Finlandia”, played here with a very large brass section, a hard hitting percussion section, a vigorous strings section and sang, in Finnish, by a really big and enthusiastic chorus:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fE0RbPsC9uE

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      • This reply was modified 2 weeks ago by  PKCano.
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    • #2125091 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      And finally, at least for right now, one of the most popular choral works of the XX Century. Dedicated to Nathan Parker, that is an assiduous student of Latin (but somehow doubt he got to study the sort of Latin the singers are singing here):

      “Carmina Burana”, the collection of songs put together by Benedictine monks in Bavaria, dating from the 11th or 12th through the 13th Century and set to music by Karl Orff a bit later than that:

      //en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carmina_Burana

      Here it is, played and sang by  a big bunch of, I would think, rather disreputable Dutch people:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MPjy55Y6hWU

      And for the curious, here is the lyrics, in Latin and English:

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carmina_Burana

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      • #2125110 Reply

        Fred
        AskWoody Plus

        Simply beautiful;

        a “bunch of disreputable Duch people” is a compliment, I reckon. After all it is in the Concertgebouw  🤣  LOL

        After all.. Just because we're paranoid doesn't mean they aren't out to get us.
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        • #2125113 Reply

          woody
          Da Boss

          The Concertgebouw harbors MANY disreputable Dutch people.

          This, I know firsthand.

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    • #2125096 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Well, that did not come out right. Second try: The lyrics, here:

      http://www.austinsymphony.org/files/Carmina_Burana_translation.pdf

       

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      • #2133321 Reply

        Fred
        AskWoody Plus

        Woody,you are brightening my day too… 🙂
        Thanks for facilitating this thread!

        After all.. Just because we're paranoid doesn't mean they aren't out to get us.
        • This reply was modified 2 weeks, 3 days ago by  Fred.
    • #2125109 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      And before I let this be (but, please, if you want to add your favorite pieces by your favorite artists, this place is, I wold hope, always open for that), one more thing.

      Richard Strauss “Four Last Songs”, that were, really, not just called that, but the last music he ever composed. It is, like Schubert’s “Death and the Maiden”, a work inspired by the realization that life is coming to an end for the artist. Sang by the marvelous Gundula Janowitz, this is a work performed in a way that the world “sublime” fits perfectly. ‘Sublime’ means ‘terrible beauty’, and these are songs to the sublime magnificence of life and the majesty of its end, when seen in calm acceptance, as in the name and theme of the last Song: “At Sunset.”

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ANdPoigJ_qw

      Herbert von Karajan conducts here the Berlin Philharmonic.

       

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    • #2125120 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      But not to leave everyone overly meditative, even sedated, contemplating their own mortality, here are a few high F’s for you from someone quite actively and vigorously contemplating death — for someone else:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YuBeBjqKSGQ

       

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    • #2125164 Reply

      Alex5723
      AskWoody Plus

      Regarding the ‘Magic Flute’ I really loved Kenneth Branagh’s 2006 fantastic interpretation movie :

      https://www.imdb.com/video/vi2769814297?playlistId=tt0475331&ref_=tt_ov_vi

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      • #2135456 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Alex573: Missed this one earlier; I’ll see if Amazon has it on DVD or available for streaming. It looks wonderfully weird, and this work deserves no less. And Kenneth Branagh is really an amazing guy. And a tremendously gifted actor: I have the DVD of his performance in “Henry V” side by side with Olivier’s, and it manages to look good even in such company.

        Also Ingmar Bergman made a movie of a whole live performance of TMF, and it is available on YT, but am not posting here the link, because I am not sure if it is even legally there. But if one searches “Magic Flute”, Bergman…

        I must say, being one who likes “fantastic” and “entertaining” when they belong together in a movie or opera, or any kind of performance, this and Puccini’s “Turandot” are my favorite operas, along with Richard Strauss’ “The Rosenkavalier” and “Ariadne auf Naxos”.

        Once, in Salzburg, I even saw excerpts of TMF shown as a puppet show, with orchestral music and singing played from a recording — so no, the puppeteers were not singing, just moving those puppets. (And the people of Salzbug will not let you ever forget theirs is Mozart’s town… just walk along the main drag and every other shop is called “Mozart this”, “Mozart that”…)

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        • #2135660 Reply

          Alex5723
          AskWoody Plus

          Here is YT of The Magic Flute from Salzburg Festival 2006 :

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=02u4Jf_aNPI

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          • #2135961 Reply

            OscarCP
            AskWoody Plus

            This is just wonderful. And with English subtitles!, although the crystal clear, crisp, very good elocution of the singers makes it feel almost unnecessary… And with the Vienna Philharmonic under Ricardo Muti! But also with the reigning Queen of the “Queen of the Night” singing that showstopper to end all showstoppers!

            And the strange fact about this work, meant mostly to entertain both children and grownups, a family-friendly opera, as it were, is that it was to be followed, as the composer’s next major work, by the incomplete “Requiem” mass that was to be poor Wolfgang’s very last thing he ever wrote and that turned out to be his own!

            But let’s leave aside such gloomy thoughts and listen to this marvelous work marvelously performed. And don’t forget: listening to Mozart’s music is assured to make you smart!

            As of right now, I am posting a little something Mozart right after the two Argerich posts — more remedy for limited intelligence. Have a listen there, you can thank me later… Always tying to help!

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    • #2125175 Reply

      wavy
      AskWoody Plus

      RE Carmina Burana one must not forget the album by ray manzarek

      Carmina_Burana_Ray_Manzarek_album_-_cover_art

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=94P8Y_etFN4

      Funny thing I wanted to take a closer look at the cover art and went downstairs to dig out my vinyl copy, spent a 1/2 hour looking w/o success 🙁 . Found a lot of stuff I couldn’t have told you I had but not the thing I KNEW I had/have .

      🤬
      � 😄

      🍻

      Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
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      • #2125222 Reply

        Myst
        AskWoody Plus

        Ray Manzarek was such a fine musician, the one performance that stands out for me was Paradise, California with guitarist Roy Rogers in 2012. https://pbase.com/alansheckter/image/141740832 And of course the days with Morrison and the Doors taking a front row seat.

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        • #2133742 Reply

          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          This is “Classical”, so I was resisting the temptation of doing something that could bring in a serious off-topic drift here, but cannot keep quiet any more. I got to say this: listening to a video of one of the Doors concerts just now, with him on guitar, first the others open with their usual good doorsy things, then comes him, gets the audience to quiet down enough and starts with a clear, crystalline trickle of sound, then a bit louder. He riffs on the Beetle’s “Eleanor Rigby” And it was as if a force field gathered around him and started expanding and expanding, sweeping away everything else on stage and leaving just him there, under a light of electric or — perhaps — divine light eternal, riffing and getting now rivulets, now thunderous rainstorms of sheer beauty out of the guitar. Nothing else that night, however good that was, could equal it. It was the pure magic of art. We are more the poorer when those such as him play for us for the last time. So, in the short time they are still with us, and us with them, let’s make the most of it. And let’s take a listen:

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=of_I1F8vQg4

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          • #2134577 Reply

            OscarCP
            AskWoody Plus

            Word of warning to the unwary and the easily surprised: the part that follows the original recording of a segment of a Doors’ concert is by a Mexican group (I think) doing a street concert as a tribute to the Doors. They are very, very good, they truly are, but theirs is not an actual Doors performance. It should not matter, but you need to know this so you don’t start wondering: what, was that them back in the early 70’s or something? What did Ray do to his hair? And so on.

            And my next posted comment, in its position in the thread, not in strict chronological order, is about Roy and friends’ “Carmina Burana”, the complete recording, so this comment right here is unrelated to that one down there.

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      • #2127381 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        And here is the whole thing in one continuous 40-minute track:

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tYlythICYqY

        Listen to these riffs and how they blend in with such a well-known composition that any misstep can be very, very embarrassing.

        Listen, I say, and weep, you philistines, you adorers of Pink Floyd out there!

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        • #2133065 Reply

          Fred
          AskWoody Plus

          And here is the whole thing in one continuous 40-minute track:

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tYlythICYqY

          Listen to these riffs and how they blend in with such a well-known composition that any misstep can be very, very embarrassing.

          Listen, I say, and weep, you philistines, you adorers of Pink Floyd out there!

          What a joy and pleasure to listen to this. It is almost sacrilege to listen to this with a smartphone and normal earplugs, because the quality (as Alex has it) I don’t have.
          A Philistijn, yes that’s right, haha. But a good one, I hope). Coincidentally, I called/call Pink Floyd the classical music of modern times, of today. Although it has been like ages since I was at their performance, playing in the woods near a house I lived in at a three-day music festival. That was in “Kralingen 1970” in (Europe, The Netherlands, city of Rotterdam, 3 days in the month of June 1970 – half an hour’s walk from where I lived at the time)
          Yes, that was a music festival a year after you Americans set a good example in Woodstock, and that was shown here as a 3.5-hour movie in the cinema.

          Thank you all for sharing such, very often real, moving music!
          ((But very bad for the nights sleep when started to listen late in the evening, like I did. Haha))

          Fred

          After all.. Just because we're paranoid doesn't mean they aren't out to get us.
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    • #2126101 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Oh, my Goodness! I forgot about the Mazarek version for choir (separate channel?) and electric guitar (solo?). Such a fantastic invention, such pure, enormous talent on display!

      Usually,I am not keen on ‘crossover’: I like my Jazz to be Jazz, Rock to be Rock, Classical to be Classical, but there are exceptions I am prepared to make, and this is one of those.

      And, now that I am here and I fear it might be getting lost among the remains of yesterday’s big and painful to do, here is the Latin original and the translation of the lyrics of “Carmina Burana” that I make here available for the enlightenment of those with prurient inclinations (you know who you are.)

      http://www.austinsymphony.org/files/Carmina_Burana_translation.pdf

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    • #2134612 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Considered, by those who consider such things, as the preeminent amongst all successful and famous pianists of the last 50 years, has lived a long and best described as very colorful life, survived three marriages and two bouts of malignant melanoma — and is still going strong.

      I have thought, in view of recent developments, to close the Doors of Classic Rock and reopen the Doors of Perception to return to full “Classic” with an appropriately classy sampler of this classiest of artist’s accomplishments — and looks — through these many years. Fell free to let me know how successful I have been in achieving this goal.

      I know someone here will be happy that I’ve done this. I, for one. Also Alex5723. And possibly more and even many more.

      So here she is, still great and at the top of her game: Martha Argerich, her life, in four performances:

      At 11, in 1956

      Bach Tocatta in G Major (Excerpt)

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b6QVY9MCvkg

      At 27  –  1969

      Liszt, Hungarian Rhapsody No. 6 (Wished, but could not find a video of her playing Liszt piano-busting “Transcendental Studies”, but the last part of this one should be a good replacement.)

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LhInwkq4nAw

      At 73 – 2014

      Bach Partita No. 2 in C minor BWV 826 (See Martha making a piano sing.)

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VNG8Jmz5zqI

      At 78 – 2019

      Liszt Piano Concerto No. 1

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FQqQcWoTPaU  (Some years after she did the one in the Albert Hall with Baremboin, but look at her! In particular, look at her hands and what she is doing with them!)

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      • #2135459 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Hmmm… I left a big gap in there, between young-thing Martha and not-so-young-anymore Martha: so here is one from her middle years — hair no longer quite so black — with a pretty decent summary story of her life and work in the “Show More” part, to boot:

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gwcIX-kw2jU

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    • #2135965 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      So, as Mozart definitely makes people smart(er) and there has not been enough Mozart here, so far, besides for that whole opera, I am making this additional entry as a public service.

      Here is, once more, the lovely and so very gifted Ms. Hahn (two characteristics that seem to be a standard package when it comes to younger and talented musicians), accompanied on the piano by Ms. Zhu, playing a little something by Wolfgang Amadeus:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x7xPIyePmNk

       

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    • #2136235 Reply

      Alex5723
      AskWoody Plus

      But let’s leave aside such gloomy thoughts and listen to this marvelous work marvelously performed. And don’t forget: listening to Mozart’s music is assured to make you smart!

      Best of all, you can download the TY video (I use 4K Video Downloader) and enjoy the full glory of the Mozart’s opera on your home theater system with 4K big smart TV 🙂

      Mozart Requiem :

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sPlhKP0nZII

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dp2SJN4UiE4

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      • #2136243 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Thanks, this is an unexpected gift and most welcome: not one, but two performances of Mozart’s Requiem!

        Can’t imagine how Mozart, very sick and chased by bill collectors, might have felt composing music for accompanying the mostly seriously gloomy and, or forbidding (*) verses of the Requiem Mass! But the rent had to be paid, the family fed! He did not live to complete it. Others touched up the truncated score. But, finally, “all his work was done and all his debts were paid.”

        http://members.optusnet.com.au/~charles57/Requiem/lyrics.htm

        I have both the Karl Bohm (my favorite) and the Herbert von Karajan recordings of this work.

        But the one by Sir Neville Marriner conducting the orchestra of San Martins in the Fields and assembled soloist singers and chorus, is one that I had not come across before when searching in YouTube’s fabled “Musical Cave of Ali Baba and his Forty Thieves.” I am listening to it as I write this comment, and it sounds as wonderful as could be expected from such combined forces.

        (*) “Dies Irae

        This day, this day of wrath
        shall consume the world in ashes,
        as foretold by David and the Sibyl.

        What trembling there will be
        When the judge shall come
        to weigh everything strictly!

        Turba Mirum

        The trumpet, scattering its awful sound
        Across the graves of all lands
        Summons all before the throne.

        Death and nature shall be stunned
        When mankind arises
        To render account before the judge.”

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      • #2136244 Reply

        Fred
        AskWoody Plus

        Thank you Alex, the Cathedral of Saint Denis, just north of Paris France, where so many kings are burried; a tremendous historical place for Mozarts Requiem.
        I will try to get it on my mediaplayer

        After all.. Just because we're paranoid doesn't mean they aren't out to get us.
    • #2136248 Reply

      Alex5723
      AskWoody Plus

      I have both the Karl Bohm (my favorite) and the Herbert von Karajan recordings of this work.

      I have Claudio Abbado’s Herbert Von Karajan’s Memorial Concert and Live performance of Teodor Currentzis Salzburger Festspielen 2017

      Mozart, Requiem, Neville Marriner
      Sylvia McNair, Carolyn Watkinson, Francisco Araiza, Robert Lloyd
      Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YaH3zI0bYkM

      Mozart Requiem Sir Neville Marriner Cadaques & Amici Musicae

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AuNdZFVZmUA

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    • #2136519 Reply

      Microfix
      Da Boss

      Modern day theme score to the movie ‘american beauty’ by thomas newman.
      Great relaxing drift off to sleep classical composition that refreshes the mind.
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SqUwDI_bV-U

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    • #2136554 Reply

      PKCano
      Da Boss

      Make “Brown Links” – use “Visual” Tab. See #2136519 above
      Before
      1Screen-Shot-2020-02-07-at-2.05.10-PM
      Enter link as text
      2Screen-Shot-2020-02-07-at-2.05.33-PM
      Highlight link, click on Link Editor, click on gear
      3Screen-Shot-2020-02-07-at-2.06.02-PM
      In popup box, be sure the link is in both boxes, click update
      4Screen-Shot-2020-02-07-at-2.06.30-PM
      Link should be hyperlink
      5Screen-Shot-2020-02-07-at-2.07.01-PM

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    • #2136742 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Inaugurating the new, All-Brown Links Era, here is something that is good to listen for relaxation, for going to sleep with a big satisfied smile on one’s face, and for when, by other means, attempting to achieve a relaxed state of bliss. Not because it is boring music, not that at all, but because it is relaxing.

      Now, this is a set of sonatas and partitas for the lute, a stringed instrument with lots of strings, played like a guitar, but with the extra strings acting as resonators to create interesting chords and reinforce the sound of those actually played.

      In modern times, up to twelve-string concert acoustic guitars have been built to have something of this effect, and played by some of the top guitar players of the last one hundred years: Narciso Yepes, most famously. But the two hours and change of pinging sounds to be found in here are interesting also as an illustration of the way in which people like J.S. Bach or W.A. Mozart, amongst the most prolific classical composers ever, managed to actually have time for other things. In the case of J.S.B., for example, to have all those children and, I suppose, to keep counting them to make sure not to loose some when the family went out shopping together, or to see a show, or something like that.

      Their secret?  They copied themselves with abandonment; they plagiarized themselves a lot. So, if when listening at what is in this video you say to yourself: “hmmm that sounds almost like…”, have no doubt, that sounds exactly like some piece by the same composer for some other solo instrument you’ve heard before. For example, at around one hour and 17 minutes, if you happened to find the melody familiar, well yes, it better be: it is Bach’s monumental “Chaconne” for solo violin, that you already have heard in the second YT video with the other “picture” link allowed here (see PKCano’s tutorial on how to post a brown link just above this posting), in the top comment at the very beginning of this thread, played there by my favorite violinist of the last two decades.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pTBooio3h9U

      So click on this link, take a deep breath, or two, or three, and prepare to relax.

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    • #2137208 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Here is my other favorite relaxing, listen-just-to-listen YT video, as well as one that can be listen paying full attention to the music:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zZbcIVTuHKQ

      There is in there a complete recording of all of Bocherini’s concerts for the cello; they are not very long concerts, because Boccherini lived and worked at a time, in the artistic period known as the Late Baroque, when, usually, they were still not very long. He was a cello-player himself, and the works in the video are a delight to listen to, probably because their composer new what it takes to play a particular series of notes in a certain way on a cello and had that in mind when selecting the notes to make sure they was something human cellists could play well if they were any good.

      One interesting thing about the YT video is its accompanying picture: the partial portrait of a well-dressed and fine-looking young lady sitting down in a pensive attitude and surrounded by different string instruments while holding a lute herself.

      The lady was Ann Ford, who was equally highly-regarded as a player of string instruments, as an actress and as a singer. The portrait is by one of the top English painters of her day, Thomas Gainsborough and, judging by this fact and by what she is wearing, it is clear that she was doing pretty well for herself. There is, as I have discovered, because I was curious about this painting, something of an artistic controversy about her portrait that had people saying things like; ‘nice painting, but I would never let one of my daughters be painted like that

      So what was wrong? Well, and this to people of our times might sound pretty strange, it was the fact that she has her legs crossed. These days, that is considered ladylike, in Ms. Ford time, it seems, it was quite the opposite. Go figure. Her dress was fashionable for her time, but also conventionally modest. And is not that her legs, or anything from much below her neck down is visible of her that is not wrapped in some opaque material. But Gansborough thought — and obviously she agreed —  that painting her in this “provocative” posture would express best her rebellious, unconventional views and life-style.

      L-P Hartley wrote in “The Go-between”, in the very first sentence: “The past is a foreign country; they do things differently there.” I won’t argue with that.

      Ann-Ford

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        wavy
        AskWoody Plus

        And is not that her legs, or anything from much below her neck down is visible of her that is not wrapped in some opaque material

        Quite different these days, not a complaint, maybe in those days it was verboten to even acknowledge that there was any thing really human down there ?

        Rather like the cello recordings thanks!!

        🍻

        Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
        • #2137476 Reply

          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          Wavy: good point. I remember that someone who grew up in Victorian England, maybe Bernard Shaw, maybe Bertrand Russell, in a book or a play that I read years ago, wrote that, as a small child, he thought that women did not have legs, but “were solid underneath their voluminous skirts.” But, for obvious reasons, she might have been wearing something less voluminous and more practical when on stage and playing her cello (or viola da gamba, as the old-style cello was called in her day).

          And now that I am here and leaving the fashion subject aside, there is something I would like you to hear. Of Vivaldi has often been said that he wrote just one concert and all the other many hundreds to his name were merely slight variations of this Ur-Concert. Not true, and so very unfair!

          Vivaldi, a priest and music teacher at the local orphanage for girls, grew up and worked for many, many years in Venice, where he become famous and his music was very much appreciated (until it stated to be seen as too old fashioned) — but did not die there. No, he died in Vienna, of a serious case of historical bad luck. When his music’s popularity was already fading in Venice, he got an invitation of the Austro-Hungarian Emperor (the titular head of of the “Holy Roman Empire”, as the official name of his domain was) to go and work at his court. So he packed up and went. Unfortunately, soon after he got there, his would-be host died, was succeeded by his daughter and (I think) only child, something that riled the Electors, the heads of the kingdoms and principalities that made up the Empire and were the ones that chose the Emperors. Particularly upset was the the King of Prussia, who immediately went on the war path. That meant that the fledgling Empress and the people helping her run things now had their hands full and no time for old Vivaldi, who was reduced to live in penury, endure the cold central European winter in a garret with little or no heating and was dead within the year of his arrival.

          But that did not stop him from continuing to compose music, until that unfortunate final outcome, partly because he was hoping to sell the product of his efforts to some rich person and make some money; partly I suppose, because he was Vivaldi.

          The result was six concerts for strings that, together, have became known as “I Concerti dell’Addio”, or “The Farewell Concerts”, for obvious reasons. And these very last concerts were something new and definitely not a rehashing of some old piece he once wrote. They are stunning and are stunningly performed here by  Fabio Biondi, a violinist that specializes in Baroque music, and his “Europa Galante” strings orchestra:

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ssh_B0-WB8

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    • #2137283 Reply

      OK…here’s one form I don’t think was mentioned; The renowned organist Nicholas Kynaston on the Royal Albert Hall 1o,ooo pipe organ* with Mendelssohn’s “War March of the Priests” (use a good set of earphones and turn it up!):

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hB3hU8kqbgo

      …and if you’re still capable of cognition after this, here’s “Summer” by Vivaldi directed by the great Von K.**; watch the 1st violinist NOT wilt under the punishment! Incredible.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bOZIGGV55Pg

      *I grew up in the company of another 10,000 pipe behemoth that eventually destroyed the Cathedral it was in from 60 years of pounding. Good days of incredible music.

      **Von Karajan was rumored to have rehearsed an orchestra for 12 hours, and said at the end, when the musicians were near hypoxia, “Well! That was almost good!

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    • #2137307 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Well, Nibbled … He has mentioned that the organ music form has been neglected here and, regretfully, I must admit that he is right.

      … the old cathedral, the Thomaskirche, where you will be attending the concert, the all-Bach concert, given by someone called E Power Biggs (and what kind of a name is “E” anyway?) in the same cathedral and (mostly) on the same organ where J.S. used to play during his days working and living thereabouts with his wife and with all their many children (so far, there were more still coming and more to come; also another wife?) in the very handsome and very historical city of Leipzig.

      So, now, here is Mr. Biggs doing something with, or to a (mostly) old organ:
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F9z0cpkmXlY

      And Nibbled also has written that he used to live near a cathedral that had a 10,000-pipes organ and, one day, got demolished (the cathedral), or blown down, by the sheer force of all those dB poured on its structural members over the years? Hmmm…

      EDITED content re posting rules

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    • #2137905 Reply

      Fred
      AskWoody Plus

      Good days of incredible music

      [at] Nibbled_To_Death_By_Ducks:
      Thank you very much, thanks to you I found it:  “J.S. Bach – The Four Great Toccatas & FuguesEdward George Power Biggs – Organ in the Freiburg Cathedral” ;
      Edward George Power Biggs was the great organplayer that my father brought me to in a concert in the late 1950’s in the “Sint Laurens Kerk” in Rotterdam, Holland (that was miraculously mostly-saved during the may-bombardment in 1940, when most of the city center was destroyd) . Great and dear memories to me!
      regards Fred
      Edward-George-Power-Biggs-March-29-1906-–-March-10-1977

      After all.. Just because we're paranoid doesn't mean they aren't out to get us.
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    • #2138007 Reply

      Alex5723
      AskWoody Plus

      Back : Bach – Piano concerti 1 – 7, PERAHIA, St. Martin in the Fields

      I have these recordings in my library of classical Music.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oUrZhqwuh2g

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dVJddiVqtac

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I643hhVCtUQ

      EDIT: Please use hyperlinks instead of text. See instructions above.

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      • #2139536 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Alex5327: Thank you so much for these very fine performances by such a gifted pianist accompanied by the great St Martin in the Fields orchestra. (Those were the days!)

        One of the works included there is the Brandenburg No. 5. So here is the whole set of 6 Brandenburg concerts, one of J.S. Bach more famous, best-liked and among his more popular works, played under the direction of the admirable Claudio Abbado, here conducting the Bologna, Italy, “Mozart” chamber music ensemble. Because he was its conductor in the last decade of his life, this is late Abbado in all its glory:

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hbQORqkStpk

         

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    • #2138013 Reply

      J Sipin
      AskWoody Plus

      Contemporary Estonian minimalist composer Arvo Pärt “Spiegel im Spiegel”.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TJ6Mzvh3XCc

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      • #2138077 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Thanks! I am not a fan of “minimalism”, but this particular piece is something else. And it has more than five million views in that YT video! (I wonder how many Estonians are there in Estonia and elsewhere?) Lovely recording!

        It puts me in mind of another one by Bach that his friend, the harpsichordist Goldberg, who had problems going to sleep, asked him for something to listen in bed that would help him to relax enough to drop off.

        Unfortunately for Goldberg, J.S. obliged with what has become known as the “Goldberg Variations”, that are something that was bound to keep the actual Goldberg, instead of going to sleep, trying to listen to the very last note and asking for more.

        You might be the judge of my previous assertion, by listening to this recording by the extraordinary Wanda Landowska, who was one the great harpsichordists virtuosos of the past century and did much to help start the interest in Baroque music, as well as in the harpsichord repertoire. And my gateway, at age 14, to classical music, when I heard her playing, in a vinyl longplay recording with an assortment of Baroque works.

        I believe that she  is playing here in an instrument that was custom made for her, with three keyboards and a large and strongly built sound-box, so it sounds louder than an old-time harpsichord, although she owned a collection of antique ones and often played on them as well:

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4jS873pDWNs

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    • #2138292 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Here, a YT video of a performance in the Concertgebouw of Amsterdam by the violinist Ray Chen with the Amsterdam Sinfonietta strings’ ensemble, playing Giuseppe Tartini “The Devil’s Thrill” sonata.

      It is called that because of some pretty lively passages and, in particular, the final cadenza, where the solo violinist’s energetic plying is starting to break strands of the horse hair of his bow. All the musicians, except the cellists, are playing standing, which I believe was the way string orchestras used to play, in Italy at least, during the Baroque period. The composer was inspired by a dream he had, where the Devil asked Tartini to teach him to play the violin. At the end of the lesson, he handed the Devil his violin and the Dark One played on it music as never heard before of such beauty, perfection and complexity.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZkX8YyA4Wp4

      Screen-Shot-2020-02-11-at-3.29.31-AM

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    • #2138875 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Here, for the weary and irritated Windows patcher: “Gymnopedies”, a series of six pieces of very soothing and delicately playful piano music by the early 20th century French composer Erik Sati.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y7kvGqiJC4g

      According to Encyclopedia Britannica:

      The word gymnopédies was derived from a festival of ancient Sparta at which young men danced and competed against each other unencumbered by clothing, and the name was a (presumably) droll reference to Satie’s gentle, dreamy, and far-from-strenuous piano exercises.

      Poor good old Sati: his music so simple, elegant, and playful, his life more complicated:

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erik_Satie

      And, on top of Sati’s relaxing music, even more relaxation: here is Claude Debussy playing his own piano music, recorded on pianola rolls.

      Back in his day, there were roll-playing pianos and recording pianos for creating the rolls. In the latter, the pianist played as on a regular piano, except that the keys pressed resulted in corresponding perforations being made on paper being fed mechanically from a roll, these perforations being each of a size and shape corresponding to the note played, its intensity, whether it was allowed to resonate or not, and if so for how long, etc.

      So here again and by the magic of this very old recording technique, is Debussy himself playing Debussy:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W2fgqT8wtcY

      There is also mention in YT’s the accompanying blurb, of “Accoustic” recordings, besides the pianola rolls already described. I am not sure, maybe is music recorded on wax cylinders? If so, those are of a pretty amazing quality for that kind of recordings.

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      • #2139451 Reply

        Fred
        AskWoody Plus

        Here, for the weary and irritated Windows patcher: “Gymnopedies”, a series of six pieces of very soothing and delicately playful piano music by the early 20th century French composer Erik Satie.

        Poor good old Satie: his music so simple, elegant, and playful, his life more complicated

        [at]OscarCP
        thank you, this is an excellent choice, and I answer you here again to tell that more than simple headphones are needed. The beautiful low tones were lost, so I played it again over the the good music speakers. Just great

        After all.. Just because we're paranoid doesn't mean they aren't out to get us.
    • #2138906 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Hmm… It looks I got my Satie wires crossed: somehow the link I copied in the immediately preceding comment was for the Gossiénnes, also by Satie. Not that there is anything bad or regrettable about my confusion, as the Gossiénnes are quite lovely in their own poignant, nostalgic way.

      So here is the recording of the Gymnopédies (also called “Gymnopodies, depending on whom one asks), as well as other pieces from (again) Gnossiénes and also from Sarabandes:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5pyhBJzuixM

      So: relax and listen, listen and relax some more.

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    • #2139325 Reply

      Alex5723
      AskWoody Plus

      Angela Hewitt loses her one of a kind ‘best friend’ as movers drop $200,000 piano

      ..Canadian Angela Hewitt is acclaimed as one of the world’s leading classical pianists.

      All of her European recordings since 2003 were performed on her Fazioli F278 concert grand piano, which was the only one in the world to have four pedals.

      She says two weeks ago movers came into her recording studio to tell her they had “dropped” it.

      The piano was kept at her home in Italy, and pianopricepoint.com estimates it is worth over $200,000 (£155,000).
      “The iron frame is broken, as well as much else in the structure and action (not to mention the lid and other parts of the case),” she wrote on Facebook. “It’s kaput.”..

      https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-51452218

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mt6r5LkBXhI

      Moderator note: Please use the hyperlink instead of text.

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    • #2139474 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Alex5327 writes here ( #2139325  ) “Angela Hewitt loses her one of a kind ‘best friend’ as movers drop $200,000 piano

      Great! So she and her piano now are all set to play a little something from Olivier Messiaen:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zYpBHc8px_U

      (Actually, this is a major work amongst those that influenced the way Western-style classical music evolved during last century.)

      Messiaen, who lived and composed during a good part of last century (1908 – 1992), dying at the ripe old age of 84 — according to Wikipedia — “was a French composer, organist, and ornithologist [as well as] one of the major composers of the 20th century.

      So far, with only one or two exceptions, all the music videos with links here have been to performances of works from somewhere between the mid-seventeenth century through the first decade or two of the twentieth. So Ms. Hewitt’s piano problems are not only enabling her to play this piece better than ever before, but it also gives me the opportunity to include here something of a less than venerable age and even as close to being called “avant garde” as music from an established, long-lived and long-active, already dead composer can be said to be.

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    • #2139656 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      I am making this addition to this thread to make up for two big omissions in the videos chosen ti have their links posted here, so far.

      Omission No 1 : No music, so far, from the Americas (you know, that land out there, made up of bits and pieces called North America, Central America and South America (with the Caribbean islands thrown in).

      So here, from the North, a composition by Aaron Copland called “Salón México”, in celebration of his birthday by the New York Philharmonic. The date of the concert:  November 20,  1960.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qj-98yBfEI0

      And from the South, Heitor Villalobos’ “Bachianas Brasileiras”, by a Youth Orchestra conducted by Leopold Stokowski with the great Anna Moffo singing:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=anxdAcilnsM

      Omission No.  2 : No music, so far, from one of the greatest of musical countries: Russia.

      So here, two works. The first, Rachmaninoff’s piano concert No. 1, played by Rachmaninof (as far as anybody knows)

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pBx-tr1FDvY

      The second, Dimitri Shostakovich’s Violin concert No, 1, played by my favorite violinist on her famous, historical and storied violin.  With Riccardo Chailli conducting the Royal Concertgebow Orchestra:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4J_kyHTbQcM

       

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    • #2140274 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Back now to the early Nineteen Century, this time with a remarkable performance of the early-romantic French composer Hector Berlioz “Symponie Fantastique” that he famously wrote based on an opium-induced hallucinatory dream he had. In its surrealistic musical program composition, one that tells a story with music: the Artist goes through a series of surreal and mostly not good experiences, ending with his untimely demise by way of being dragged to a place of execution, there to hang by the neck (or, in France, probably to have it neck scientifically cut off with a guillotine) until dead. As Leonard Bernstein put it: “Berlioz tells it like it is. You take a trip, you wind up screaming at your own funeral.

      This item is remarkable both for the large scale of the work being performed, the way it is performed and, last but no least, by how the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, here in full-force, with a large and appropriately loud brass section, is conducted by Mr. Stephane Denev.

      What is remarkable about the video: the remarkable quality of the sound and how remarkably well filmed it is, showing in detail how the various instruments are being played, something that always has interested me to see.

      And above all, the super-remarkable fact that the conductor, Mr. Denev, is actually seen to be doing the job he is supposed to do: of giving entrance to the instruments, signalling the players when to play soft, when to increase the volume and when to go with all stops pulled out, so to speak. And to see the members of the orchestra following, for once, their conductor’s instructions, or at least bothering to look at him, now and then, and definitely managing to follow his hand movements one half-beat behind, as it should be.

      So here is the video:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I1AvexPDTnw

      (Sorry, MVPs, but I have done all I can to get a brown YT link and just keep getting this  “picture” link instead. I can’t think of what else to do. This is really very odd. Never happened before}

      Screen-Shot-2020-02-13-at-6.26.58-PM

       

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    • #2140402 Reply

      migongo
      AskWoody Lounger

      Hope you like this superb interpretation (best “Elvira Madigan” I’ve heard):

      Mozart: Piano Concerto N° 21 in C Major, K467

      Orchestra Filarmonica della Scala (Milano, Italy)

      Director: Riccardo Muti

      Piano: Marizio Pollini

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i2uYb6bMKyI

      And this one, Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto N° 2 op. 18 Personally I preffer Martha Argerich’s style but seems, based on viewers numbers, like youtubers disagree

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rEGOihjqO9w

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      • #2140409 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        mgongo: Thanks! That is a fine combination of forces: the orchestra of La Scala, conducted by Ricardo Muti and with Pollini at the piano, performing Mozart’s piano concerto No. 21. I wonder how many saw — or saw and remember much of that 1970’s movie. But those of us who saw it I doubt can ever forget that last scene, where everything stops, frozen for ever in that last, perfect, timeless instant before the end.

        Now you have brought this other thing to my memory: here is an all-Ravel concert that begins with Martha Argerich at the piano playing Ravel’s Concerto in G, performed by a certain orchestra conducted by Riccardo Chailli playing in the open air, in a particular square of a much storied city, guess where:

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zXqOhLUvT7w

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    • #2140411 Reply

      Alex5723
      AskWoody Plus

      Pachelbel: Canon & Gigue; Bach, Handel, Vivaldi (Musica Antiqua Koln, Reinhard Goebel)

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dQnS2gPdDAo

       

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    • #2140412 Reply

      Alex5723
      AskWoody Plus

      wonder how many saw — or saw and remember much of that 1970’s movie.

      I have the movie in my collection as well some of Mozart’s work.

      And here is piano solo performance : ‘Elvira Madigan’ theme performed by Werner Elmker

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wZ9zpoJcYGY

       

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    • #2140722 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      First of all, thank you, Alex5723 for posting all those links to performances that are big crowd pleasers.
      And also some apologies for some erratic spelling in a couple of recent comments. One of them I could not edit, because it was immediately abducted by the system running AskWoody and taken away to be moderated. I think that I triggered some automatic action of the system, perhaps by posting four links in the same page.

      Now here are three links to an equal number of YT videos (and we’ll see how that goes — latest news: it went just fine). The links are to three performances of works by American composers, meaning not those of any particular country, but those of the continental mass known as ‘America’, that nearly reaches from pole to pole.

      First, from North America, a truly great performance, with equally great audio engineers recording it, of the “Grand Canyon Suite” of Ferde Grofé. This is a late fifties, monoaural recording made by the extraordinary combination of Eugene Ormandy (one of the maybe five conductors of last century that I can honestly call “Great”) and the Philadelphia Orchestra he directed for many years. Don’t be stopped by the early date or the mono recording. Just go ahead and listen to it – and then you can thank me. OK, you are welcome.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xe7wC-HG6RQ

      Here, again from North America, something by Aaron Copland, with Aaron himself conducting the National Symphonic Orchestra at the Kennedy Center, in Washington DC: “Appalachia Spring”:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xxd1cmenki8

      And here, last, but not list, something from South America, from Argentina to be more precise: a short piece for the piano by Alberto Ginastera (from “Danzas Argentinas”, or “Argentine Dances) played by Argentine pianist Martha Argerich in her true, signature piano-busting mode:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8U2CrKkFvww&list=RDZlR0xCIF7sQ&index=3

      The name of this short piece is “Danza del Gaucho Matrero”, that means something like “Dance of the Gaucho Fugitive from Justice and Gone Feral”)
      Not all of Ginastera’s pieces are this energetic, so if you use the link and find some more of his works played by Argerich or her fellow Argentinian-born (an also Israeli citizen) Daniel Barenboim, consider taking a listen to some of those as well.

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    • #2140935 Reply

      Fred
      AskWoody Plus

      R.I.P.. “Reinbert de Leeuw (8 September 1938 – 14 February 2020)”, Director & composer, and honored.

      One may call him a putist and non-pleaser ::
      Opposite to only fame, and the greatest, and the best etc as some cultures and classes pursue :: there are others working more originally …

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reinbert_de_Leeuw
      Playing early works::
      https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=rbQQkmPv0uE

      It is a pity that “Reinbert de Leeuw” has passed away.

      Fred

      After all.. Just because we're paranoid doesn't mean they aren't out to get us.
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      • #2140997 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        What an intelligent and lovely performance! The “Gossiénnes” are such a balm for the irritated, distressed or plain angry soul; it is music that says: “Sshshh! There are better things worth caring for; take a break, listen to me and forget about those things you are upset about. Those are, ultimately, trivial things. Here, from me, you may relearn the beauty of what truly matters, because here and in me there is true beauty, besides which little else matters.”

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    • #2140944 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      I have stated in a commentary on Ray Manzarek and his very fine and original rendition of “Carmina Burana” that I am not keen on “crossover” music (blending classical and rock styles, in this case), but that I make exceptions and that was one. Here is another example where I definitely have no problem with a “crossover”, in this case the blending of traditional Catholic religious music with folkloric music. I am making an exception because the “Misa Criolla”  (“Creole Mass”, ‘Creole’ here meaning ‘of the sons of the land’) by the Argentinian folklorist and distinguished musician Ariel Ramirez, is truly exceptional.

      When back in the 60’s, the Vatican Council II agreed and Pope John XXIII promulgated a wide-ranging series of reforms to the traditions and practices of their millenary institution, the reforms included the permission to celebrate the Mass in the language of the people, in every nation. This brought about a tremendous flourishing of religious music in the vernacular and, in Argentina, Ariel Ramirez took part of it by producing the remarkable work I am providing a YT link here  to a performance by a choral group and musicians of the University of California Los Angeles. The result is both impressive sounding, while keeping faithfully to the idea of Ramirez of it being very moving, but also faithful to the forms and spirit of Argentinian folk music

      Argentina covers a very large portion of South America, made to look smaller in most maps by the same distortion that makes Greenland look almost as large as Africa. But in reality, because of its size, it contains many different regions with quite different landscapes, climates and diverse mixes of Native American and European cultures. From all of which fairly diverse musical styles arouse and are represented here in the various parts of the mass, each of which belongs to a different traditional form typical of a different part of Argentina. Some of it shows mainly an European influence, others that of the native people, particularly in the northwest of the country, that once was part of the Incas’ Empire and, before that, of other powerful nations that had preceded the Incas. So music from there is mostly built on the pentatonic scale. This region is also part of a continuous of culture and traditions that extends from central Chile and NW Argentina, through the uplands of Bolivia and the mountains, deserts and jungles of Peru, all the way north to Ecuador.

      Now, here, performed by the UCLA University Chorus, Chamber Singers & Guitar Ensemble, conducted by Rebecca Lord, is Ariel Rodriguez’s “Misa Criolla”:

      https://www.youtube.com

      The mass is sang in Spanish and is divided in the five canonical parts, each sang to music in a different traditional Argentinian style: Kyrie, Gloria, Credo, Sanctus and Agnus Dei

       

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      • #2140953 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Now here …. is Ariel Ramirez‘s “Misa Criolla” of course, but not ‘.. Ariel Rodríguez…’ as I wrote in the last sentence before the link. What was I thinking? Miserere mei!

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      • #2140988 Reply

        migongo
        AskWoody Lounger

        Talking about Argentinians:

        As part of the series of celebrations of the 2009 edition of the Nobel Prize, Martha Argerich performed this concert (see Report #2140409 above), captivating an audience chaired by the kings of Sweden, the laureates, the jury and a select minority of guests.

        It will not be casual that, seven years later, she chose to interpret the same piece. This time in Milano, in the Piaza del Domo, in the open air, with the maximum philharmonic orchestra of Italy (the La Scala orchestra), and for a heterogeneous audience with free assistance.

        Stresses, in this interpretation, the emotion to the skin of Martha: smile, gesture, “dance”, swinging on the keys to the rhythm of the piece, enjoy, have fun … All without taking into account that he suffered a wound in the left thumb, which is bandaged and that, only a thousandth fraction of a second, as fearful when hitting the keyboard.

        That fame of cold, sharp, haughty and distant … Even the qualification of despot (poured by his daughter), may well be paid to the benefit of the doubt (or the idiosyncratic “savoir faire” Argentine).

        I do it personally. I already admired her, now, after seeing her and listening carefully to this concert, even more. Not to doubt it, the best I have attended from Martha Argerich. Thanks again for sharing.

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    • #2140970 Reply

      Alex5723
      AskWoody Plus

      “crossover” music

      I love “crossmusic” when Classic music meets Jazz like in Jacques Loussier – The Best Of Bach

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9zO_v3HP7Wc

      Or his Goldberg Variations – Jacques Loussier Trio

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CL5_DIPpNvg

       

       

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    • #2140987 Reply

      Alex5723
      AskWoody Plus

      Beethoven Triple Concerto & Choral Fantasy – Yo Yo Ma, Perlman, Barenboim

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EI27Os7H3_k

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    • #2141002 Reply

      Fred
      AskWoody Plus

      R.I.P.. “Reinbert de Leeuw (8 September 1938 – 14 February 2020)”, Director & composer, and honored.

      One may call him a putist and non-pleaser ::
      Opposite to only fame, and the greatest, and the best etc as some cultures and classes pursue :: there are others working more originally …

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reinbert_de_Leeuw
      Playing early works::
      https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=rbQQkmPv0uE

      It is a pity that “Reinbert de Leeuw” has passed away.

      Fred

      To indicate: even this picture is part of the tekst, to indicate the atmosphere;  the text in this picture is in German and French,  and not in Queens_English

      RdLeeuw_Satie

      After all.. Just because we're paranoid doesn't mean they aren't out to get us.
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    • #2141299 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Using Google Translate: “Until then, modern music hardly had a place of its own in the Netherlands. In November 1969, young Reinbert de Leeuw (anno 1938) went along with a group of fellow composers – called De Notenkrakers – to the Concertgebouw, ‘the bastion of bourgeois culture’, armed with squeeze frogs and a performance by Bernard Haitink. to disturb. The same group, supplemented by writers Harry Mulisch and Hugo Claus, had already premiered six months earlier in Carré the radical-left opera “Reconstruction”, dedicated to freedom fighter Che Guevara.”

      I may not be a great fan of “el Ché” for many different good reasons, but, oh yes, there are ‘Lions’ in Holland! Thanks Fred for this comment and link. My Dutch is rudimentary, but I’ve got the gist of it (without help from GT).

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    • #2141457 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Here is a historical recording of Schubert “The Trout” quintet. An unusual work for its time, written with a double bass replacing the second violin in the string quartet that, along with the piano. had always formed the classic piano and strings quintet. Schubert, at 22, back in the 1810s and already popular for his songs but just starting his career as a composer of larger instrumental works, arranged it this way to satisfy the fanciful request of a rich would-be sponsor that he really needed to please.

      The video starts with a documentary section where first the players careers so far are summarized in voice over, as they are seen going about their everyday lives; then they are seen arriving by jet plane at a London (Heathrow?), where they will perform together. Then they can be seen, an heard!, practicing (and horsing around) for their concert that will take place soon after; one of them is filmed buying a viola for his wife, and so on. There is more laughing and fooling around just before the beginning of the concert, then the artists file into the concert hall and their performance begins (at about 14:00 minutes into the video — if you wanted to skip those preliminaries, there is where you click to hear — and see — the music begin.

      And now here they are, as they once were, in the now so distant late 1960’s, in the full vigor of their youth: Jacqueline duPre and her cello, Daniel Barenboim, playing the piano, Pinchas Zukerman, the viola and Itzhak Perlman the violin, and Zubin Mehta, the double bass, in this one-for-the-ages performance of Schubert’s “The Trout”:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZZdXoER96is

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      • #2141624 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Here is a later recording by three of the same artists that played in the “Trout”, Barenboim, du Pré and Zukerman, of a work from Beethoven’s “middle period”, when he was having a tremendous creative outpouring with little to compare with in the history of music. Among some of his landmark works, he wrote two trios, of which the one in the YT video linked here (No. 1, Opus 70, in D major) got to be known as “The Ghost” for its eerie sounding slow middle movement.

        The music was recorded in what seems to have been a large and, at the time, empty church. The sound quality of this video is superior to the one of “The Trout”, so one can appreciate better that of the sounds each player gets out of his or her instrument. The mood of the players, in contrast with their playfulness in the “Trout” video, here is a serious, at times even solemn one.

        Two of the performers are still active and playing as well as ever. The other one, Jacqueline du Pré, was at the time of that performance just a few short years away from experiencing the first symptoms of the devastating illness that progressively destroyed her central nervous system, depriving her first of that delicate an subtle touch that characterized her playing, then of her ability to play at all, then of that of teaching, then of that of taking care of herself and, at the very end, of that which is the last thing that is left to anyone: the light of her eyes.

        So here, to be evoked once more by using this link to bring it back, is the ghost of that moment in a day, more than forty years ago (as I write this) when the three, who were all still alive, fit and young, performed Beethoven’s “Ghost”:

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ReZeyI8Z5wk

         

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        • #2141655 Reply

          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          And to end this little series remembering the great performances by du Pré and her fellow eminent artists, here there are two more videos.  I could not find in YT her recording of two of Bach’s Suites for solo violoncello, some of the most profound works written for that repertoire and interpreted by her with her usual sure touch and authority in every note, she played, because once it was there and now it’s gone, as often happens.

          So, instead, here is her monumental?; towering?; epoch-making?; all of the above? performance of Elgart’s Cello Concerto in E minor, Op. 85, her then husband Daniel Barenboim conducting I’m not sure what orchestra, but it hardly matters here.

          Because if Helena of Troy had a face that launched a thousand ships, if the sight, in real time, on TV of Neil Armstrong setting foot on the Moon and flubbing his  famous one liner launched the careers of tens of thousands of engineers, scientists (YT’s included) and even of scores of astronauts, then du Pré’s early performances of this old concert hall workhorse, a broody work by Elgart who, at the time was both mourning the death of his wife and the slow-moving disaster that was World War I, this one performance, then, is the concert that launched a thousand careers of cello players.

          I have heard, since then, many good cellists perform this work, but no one has got even near her level when playing, even when some did extremely well:

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OPhkZW_jwc0

          And here, the same trio of du Pré (cello), Bernboim (piano) and Zukerman (violin) that did Beethoven “Ghost” are back, in memory still green, to play another of his trios, No.7 Op.97, known as the “Archduke”:

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LUwTwQTXG8E

          Finally, du Pré (an English lady with a French name she got due to her father family’s origins in the Channel Islands) with her cello and Barenboim conducting, I think that at the Albert Hall in London, some time back  in the sixties — play Antonín Dvořák’s Concerto in B minor, Op. 104. She does it with her usual passionate enthusiasm, and breaks a string. But, unfazed, walks out, puts a new string in her cello, comes back and Barenboim gets he orchestra to start to play the same, interrupted movement again, from the beginning. And she plays as usual, as if nothing, in absolute, had ever interrupted her:

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U_yxtaeFuEQ

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          • #2141690 Reply

            OscarCP
            AskWoody Plus

            Oh, well, I can’t help adding this one example of very fine cello playing, not by du Pré this time, but by a most excellent cellist still very much alive and that by way of the included YT link can be seen and heard in concert with her lucky husband, Pinchas Zukerman, who is also still very much with us, along with Yoel Levi conducting the Korean Broadcasting System Orchestra. So here is the Canadian Amanda Forsyth in Brahms Double Concert for Violin and Cello in A minor, Opus 102. (And based on the two outstanding cellists — counting this one in — that I have commented on so far, for me this brings to mind the interesting question of whether for women to be great cellists, they are required by Nature to be stunningly gorgeous blondes with long hair? If you know of any who are also fine looking redheads or brunettes, with long, short hair, or dreadlocks, please let me know 🙂

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1eO6Hcx_2c8

             

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    • #2141460 Reply

      Alex5723
      AskWoody Plus

      Another “crossmusic” : Dave Brubeck Quartet – Brubeck Meets Bach (2007)

      CD1

      Concerto For Two Pianos And Orchestra, c-minor BWV 1060 (J.S.Bach)
      01. Allegro 5:21
      02. Adagio 5:04
      03. Allegro 4:00
      Points On Jazz For Two Pianos And Chamber Orchestra (Brubeck; arr. Kaska)
      04. Prelude 4:17
      05. Scherzo 1:58
      06. Blues 4:57
      07. Fugue 3:13
      08. Rag 2:42
      09. Chorale 2:09
      10. Waltz 2:08
      11. A La Turk 7:23

      CD2

      01. Jazz Selection (W.C.Handy) 11:53
      02. Unsquare Dance (Brubeck) 5:42
      03. Lullaby (Brubeck) 6:17
      04. Brandenburg Gate (Brubeck) 14:22
      05. Regret (Btubeck) 10:10
      06. Blue Rondo A La Turk (Brubeck) 10:56
      07. Take Five (Desmond) 10:30
      08. Guten Abend, Gut’ Nacht (J.Brahms) 2:07

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FQO90Q_E4rg

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    • #2141861 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      OK: all the crossover enthusiasm around here is starting to get to me, but in a certain way that some might not expect.

      Let’s first consider the most frequently encountered kind of crossover, also referred to as  ‘Fusion’: Classical, mostly Bach and, now and then, a few others, fused with Jazz: ‘Cool’ Jazz, to be more exact. So what the “fusionists” mostly do? Here  is the recipe:

      (1) Take a few measures of, probably, something by J.S. Bach.

      (2) Add a dash of jazzy improvisation,  and riff it wonderfully well.

      (3) Chill and serve with a dash of whisky (or vodka) and a corkscrew of lemon peel.

      In other words, take some Bach, play it a straight for a few bars easily recognizable by many, then improvise, very loosely, on that foundation borrowed from J.S.B.

      But how about going the opposite way: Create a completely original structure of sound and rhythm and color it with the right mix of instruments, then infuse it with something else from what then becomes the other half of the ‘fusion’? Why not do that as well? Well, truth be told, that it is much, much harder, because it takes not just a top instrumentalist with a knack for riffing on any giving theme, but it requires a higher level of skill both as a composer as well as a performer.

      Now, let me be very clear: Brubeck, Muddy Waters, and other greats were truly great. But there is always a higher level to be aspired, and when it is reached, then we have something else altogether.

      So, how about the fusion of Tango and Jazz? What happens when one innovator in one musical form joins up with one in quite another?

      Well, this is what happened when Astor Piazzolla (Tango) and Greg Mulligan (Jazz) joined forces to make this recording:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OLiJwjc6F1A

      Or when Piazzolla put together his own orchestra (one of several) and ‘fused’ Tango and Jazz acting both as original composer creating the musical foundation, not by borrowing it from J.S.B, for example, but entirely “from scratch” and then perform it along with the brilliant colleagues he had chosen to form his orchestra? Well this is what happened:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=urou6jIXbJ8

      Or when Yo Yo Ma decided to put together a number of compositions from Piazzolla, and made this recording of the result:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JI_aQvy1i8I

      So who was Astor Piazzolla again?

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Astor_Piazzolla

      And, say, who was Greg Mulligan?

      Oh, really?

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    • #2141862 Reply

      Alex5723
      AskWoody Plus

      Brahms Double Concert for Violin and Cello in A minor, Opus 102.

      With Jascha Heifetz · Gregor Piatigorsky : 1 – Allegro

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EQgWKVWJMeY&list=OLAK5uy_kgr_FjmFuXZk0jUnTRM_zhoAPcOhdNSMQ

      A whole different atmosphere to the music. More mature in my eyes.

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    • #2141879 Reply

      Alex5723
      AskWoody Plus

      But how about going the opposite way

      This type of fusion doesn’t get to me. I stay on Classic > Jazz 🙂

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      • #2143444 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Alex, for my part, I think I get both. And while Classical+Jazz is very interesting and even great on occasion, the fact remains that those on the ‘Classical’ side, old J.S.B., for example, while great innovators in their day, are not around now to actively collaborate, like Piazzolla and Mulligan, to create a totally new, from scratch, original kind of fusion music — or just a plain new kind of music never before heard. And that I find even more interesting — and also quite rare and not easy to find, for obvious reasons.

        So if someone here can give other examples of this second kind of fusion (and there has to be more around), perhaps of Swahili choral music from southern Africa with Brazil’s Bossa Nova? Why not? To those truly creative, the world is their oyster.

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    • #2144973 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      And to close with a golden brooch, I expect, my own little excursion into ‘Fusion’ or ‘Crossover’, here is another example of a different mix: Stan Getz and Joao Gilberto with a little something they whipped up together to get this 50 – 50 Jazz and Bossa Nova treat that is a bit like both and a lot like neither, but when they came up with it, was something quite new in the world:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ckmcdcQ2mEg

       

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    • #2148647 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Now, back from my ‘Fusion’ hike, here I am also back in full-classic mode with something that more classic that it simply does not exist:

      The six suites for unaccompanied cello, played in their totality by two of the greatest interpreters of these remarkable and very difficult works, with significant, and audible, differences in their interpretation of them: Paul Tortelier, French, and Pau Casals, a patriotic Catalán and the most principled of men.

      He famously chose to live in a permanently self-imposed exile from his beloved Catalonia, now a semi-autonomous region of North-East Spain, rather than to live there and be, even by implication, in complicity with the tyranny of Franco. But not as a passive exile, as he in every possible way kept reminding both the powerful and the common citizens of the kind of wrong that should never be forgotten nor forgiven. He was acting in the best tradition of the great romantic composers, such as Chopin, or Verdi, that made of their music subtle but unforgiving weapons against the oppressors of their people.

      Also, and very interestingly, he was wont to play the whole six suites in one sitting (with “convenience” breaks? History is irritatingly mute on this very important point). He played them, in fact, or so we are told, every single day and, towards the end of his life, he said that he had started to notice “some improvement”, So here is he playing the six suites for unaccompanied cello, by J.S. Bach:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ePPMrX4YtkM Casals I

      And here are Tortelier’s two parts of three suites each:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6eJn0hgLyKk

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qUPkSMlcV9A

      OK, I have this also by Mischa Maisky, as well as two of the Suites by du Pré (now not available in YT), but I don’t believe in piling it up. So enjoy.

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    • #2153751 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      The “Musical Offering” by J.S. Bach consists of a series of different types of counterpunctual music, from canon to sonata, composed by J.S.B. at the strong suggestion from King Frederick II (called “The Great”) of Prussia, who was also a respectable musician: flute player and composer whose works are still played at concerts. The king, at Bach’s request, then played a rather long theme of, presumably, his own invention, on his flute, and Bach promised to make something of it. The result is the topic of this comment.

      One of the most famous parts of the “Offering”, and of the whole Bach repertoire, is the “Ricercar a 6” a composition for six voices that play both with and against each other in a most fantastic cascade of sound. Bach also wrote a version adapted for keyboard instruments, because  human piano, organ, or harpsichord players only have four extremities (and only organ players can really use all four).

      Here is an interesting looking animation of the Ricercar a 6:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KYouXtuk0T8

      And here is an episode from a German/Hungarian TV program (in German, with English subtitles) chronicling Bach’s life, with a reenactment of the meeting between the king and Bach where he got his invitation to compose a little something based on the what right away became known as the  “Thema Regium” or “King’s Theme”.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WdmcabpiGYU

      And here is the actual thing, all of it — to me one of the most delightful stimulant and beautiful things I have ever heard and I often listen to. (And listening to it also does make people cleverer, take it from me  — although, full disclosure, I started being clever, or so my mother and some of my better girlfriends have informed me, which always helps.) The music begins with the king’s theme without any ornamentation or harmonization, just the same plain sequence of notes Frederick played in his flute, and then Bach takes it from there…

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ooqdCeswX9k

      Finally, from “Gödel, Escher Bach: an Eternal Golden Thread” by Duglas R. Hoftstadter (the book many bought because Martin Gardener so much recommended it, but never got past page 20) is this excerpt, where the actual meeting between Frederick and Bach is recounted as told by Bach’s biographers, near the beginning of Chapter 1:

      One May evening in 1747, an unexpected guest showed up. Johann Nikolaus Forkel, one of Bach’s earliest biographers, tells the story as follows:
      ‘One evening, just as he [Frederick] was getting his flute ready, and his musicians were assembled, an officer brought him a list of the strangers who had arrived. With his flute in his hand he ran over the list, but immediately turned to the assembled musicians, and said, with a kind of agitation, “Gentlemen, old Bach is come.” The flute was now laid aside, and old Bach, who had alighted at his son’s lodgings [the son was emplyed as a King’s musician], was immediately summoned to the Palace. Wilhelm Friedemann [Bach’s son], who accompanied his father, told me this story, and I must say that 1 still think with pleasure on the manner in which he related it. At that time it was the fashion to make rather prolix compliments. The first appearance of J. S. Bach before se great a King, who did not even give him time to change his traveling dress for a black chanter’s gown, must necessarily be attended with many apologies. I will not here dwell en these apologies, but merely observe, that in Wilhelm Friedemann’s mouth they made a formal Dialogue between the King and the Apologist.
      But what is mere important than this is that the King gave up his Concert for this evening, and invited Bach, then already called the Old Bach, to try his fortepianos, made by Silbermann, which he kept in several rooms of the palace. [Forkel here inserts this footnote: “The pianofortes manufactured by Silbermann, of Frevberg, pleased the King se much, that he resolved to buy them all up. He collected fifteen. I hear that they all now stand unfit for use in various corners of the Royal Palace.’

       

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    • #2154129 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      This collection of J.S. Bach concerts for oboe and oboe d’amore (an early form of the oboe) is a collection of works from the lighter side of his huge production. The video has a good execution of the works, but it is illustrated with a tragic and depressing “cautionary tale” that has nothing at all to do with the music, particularly with its warm and bright style. The background illustration is in the form of a sequence of Hogarth’s prints called “The Rake’s Progress” (a sarcastic pun on John Bunyan’s “The Pilgrims’ Progress”). Being by Hogarth, the prints are both gorgeous and very, very realistic. This sequence is definitely OK to look at once, but I would minimize the screen after that and just listen to the music again, instead.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tOc6I7rxAO8

      And to complement the above video, here is one where my favorite fiddler plays J.S. Bach’s violin concert BWV 1060 in C minor, that is really a double concert for violin and oboe, here with both violinist and oboist pretty evenly matched in the quality of their interpretations and playing some truly lovely duets, particularly in the second, slow movement:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Erwt9IexcCA

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    • #2163709 Reply

      migongo
      AskWoody Lounger

      @oscarcp, you asked something about Bossa Nova. In fact Bossa Nova is a fusion of brazilian “samba” –wich, in turn, is a fusion of african, portuguese and brazilian tribal rythms– and jazz (Carlos Lyra, Bossa Nova composer, has a piece titled “Jazz Influence”).

      I hope you enjoy this superb interpretation of a classical, the most known Bossa Nova theme: “The Girl from Ipanema”, composed by Tom Jobim, who recorded an album with Frank Sinatra singing his music.

      I’m son of brazilians, lived in Brazil for many years, love his musical weath and, believe me, I think this is the most awesome interpretation I’ve herad about this classic:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RwVX2FHwZEk

      Here is the full concert:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ct41WfutDBA

      Best regards!

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      • #2169383 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        migongo: Thanks! That is a real classic.

        To attempt repay such a favor, here is the famous recording of Stan Getz and Charlie Byrd’s trumpet and guitar with a group of good musicians they put together, that in the late 60’s started the explosion of Bossa Nova in popularity here in the USA and other places as well. I first heard this when I was living in Australia and still remember the big impression it made on me and my friends then:

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w7VGpKdX3f8

        And is this a sort of re-fusion, because Gilberto invented Bossa Nova as a fusion of Samba and Jazz?

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        • #2169441 Reply

          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          Oh Dear! I have really been going on about Getz and his ‘trumpet’?!

          And, er, where is my  head now? It’s always getting lost somewhere.

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          • #2169465 Reply

            OscarCP
            AskWoody Plus

            To atone for my mistake, here is my offering of an album by Toquinho and Paulinho Moreira of music by several composers of Bossa Nova and of other things, such as J.S.B. (track no. 2):

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=81DjBm0GZHY

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    • #2169386 Reply

      Alex5723
      AskWoody Plus

      Science and Music : https://bgr.com/2020/02/21/violin-surgery-brain-tumor-kings-college/

      The brain is a complicated organ, and when surgeons are tasked with removing dangerous brain tumors they have to be incredibly careful not to cause unintended damage. For Dagmar Turner, a 53-year-old tumor patient at King’s College Hospital in London, ensuring that she could continue to enjoy her passion for playing the violin, that meant demonstrating her musical talents for the surgical team as they were performing their operation.

      In Turner’s case, the tumor the doctors were targeting happened to be near her right frontal lobe. That’s a tricky area to operate on, as removal or damage to certain brain structures could cause a loss of fine motor skills. That’s where the violin came in.

      By allowing Turner to remain awake and alert enough to play her violin during the operation, the surgeons could be certain that they weren’t impacting any areas of her brain that were being actively used. It’s a technique that has been used before, and it proved to be useful in this case as well.

      ….

      Watch a violinist play her instrument while undergoing brain surgery

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