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  • Better video quality for HDMI monitor

    Posted on MrJimPhelps Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Home Forums AskWoody support PC hardware Better video quality for HDMI monitor

    This topic contains 12 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  MrJimPhelps 4 weeks ago.

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    • #1876943 Reply

      MrJimPhelps
      AskWoody_MVP

      I recently purchased a new HDMI monitor for my laptop. This meant that I could no longer use the one HDMI port for my old monitor. So I purchased a Plugable Mini DisplayPort to HDMI 2.0 Active Adapter (model MDP-HDMI), so I could plug the old HDMI monitor into the laptop’s Mini DisplayPort jack, thereby having two external monitors for my laptop.

      I am amazed at how much better the video quality is on my old HDMI monitor now that I have connected it to the Mini DisplayPort jack (as opposed to the HDMI port). The image was a bit fuzzy before, but now it is crystal clear.

      I am also using a newer HDMI cable now than I was before, so perhaps that has something to do with the improved picture quality.

      My laptop is a Dell Latitude E7450 running Windows 10. My old monitor is a Dell ST2010F LCD monitor, manufactured in November of 2010.

      Group "L" (Linux Mint)
      with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
    • #1876986 Reply

      Paul T
      AskWoody MVP

      And the quality on your new monitor?
      Have you tried the old cable on the new monitor?

      cheers, Paul

      • #1877206 Reply

        MrJimPhelps
        AskWoody_MVP

        The new monitor has spectacular quality – 27″ of crystal clear text and everything else.

        No, I haven’t swapped the cable; I understand that the newer HDMI cable could be a major factor in the improvement. But everytime I make any change in the monitor situation, I have to start over from scratch with my monitor setup. Since what I have currently is really good, I just want to leave well enough alone.

        Group "L" (Linux Mint)
        with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
    • #1877087 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      If the computer’s socket and, or the cable’s jack of your old HDMI connection is not working quite well, e.g. if the impedances between the cable and the ports in the laptop or in the monitor (or in both) are not well-matched, this can produce reflections that will cause multiple superimposed images looking like a blur in the resulting image. So it may be worth keeping in mind, among other possibilities, that this issue could be caused by your old HDMI cable or by the computer’s HDMI socket you have been using exclusively until recently with your old monitor. If I read you description of the problem correctly, it might be coming from the HDMI socket in your computer, assuming you are using the same cable as before but connected with the adapter to the Mini DisplayPort, which is working well.

    • #1877233 Reply

      Paul T
      AskWoody MVP

      If I read you description of the problem correctly, it might be coming from the HDMI socket in your computer

      That is now used for the new “crystal clear” monitor.

      cheers, Paul

      • #1877604 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        PaulT: According to MrJimPhelps: “I am amazed at how much better the video quality is on my old HDMI monitor now that I have connected it to the Mini DisplayPort jack (as opposed to the HDMI port

        So, as explained by him, the crystal clear view in the old monitor is obtained when connecting through the MiniDisplay Port, not the HDMI port he had been using exclusively, until recently.

        • #1877734 Reply

          anonymous

          Correct Oscar. I was going to post the below.

          Sorry, but no Paul I think you are wrong. Phelps said, his crystal clear monitor was plugged into “the Mini DisplayPort jack (as opposed to the HDMI port)”, and he is “also using a newer HDMI cable now than I was before”.

          It seems his old 2010 HDMI monitor is crystal clear by not using the HDMI connection. So Oscar may be right.

    • #1877714 Reply

      MrJimPhelps
      AskWoody_MVP

      Here’s my new monitor – I got it for $169:

      LG Class 27″ Full-HD LED Monitor, 27MP48HQ-P

      aspect ratio — 16:9
      Built-in Speakers — Yes
      contrast ratio — 1,000:1
      Display Type — IPS LED
      HDCP Compatible — Yes
      Led Backlight — Yes
      model — 27MP48HQ-P
      refresh rate — 75 Hz
      typical response time — 5 ms
      Screen Size (Diagonal) — 27 in.
      width — 15 in.
      Maximum Viewing Angle (Horizontal) — 178 degrees
      native resolution — 1920 x 1080
      contrast ratio — 1,000:1
      Screen Split 2.0
      27″ full-HD screen uses IPS and FreeSync technologies
      DTV-ready thanks to the HDMI™ 2.0 port
      Screen Split 2.0 lets you resize and display several windows simultaneously. Offers 14 different options with 4 picture-in-picture modes.
      Reader mode helps lessen blue light emissions to keep your eyes strain during long periods of reading.

      It has HDMI and VGA ports. I will likely never use the VGA port; but on occasion I am setting up an old computer which has only a VGA port, and in those cases this monitor can be used for setting up that computer.

      Group "L" (Linux Mint)
      with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
      • #1877725 Reply

        MrJimPhelps
        AskWoody_MVP

        Whenever I order a computer for a customer, I always try to get one with a VGA port in addition to a digital video port or two, so that they can use any monitor with it in an emergency. Likewise, I always try to get a VGA port in addition to one or more digital video ports on all monitors that I purchase, so that the monitor can be used with any computer in an emergency.

        I just recently ordered about 15 new computers for one of my customers. Each computer has VGA, DisplayPort, and HDMI video ports. They will be able to use any monitor with each of those computers.

        VGA is not what you want for normal use, but it’s better than nothing in an emergency.

        I grabbed one of the few VGA-only monitors that they had and brought it home; I use that monitor for doing the initial setup of their computers, or for doing a clean install of Windows, at my house. Because each of their new computers has a VGA port, I can set them up at home, then connect a better-quality monitor once I bring it to their office.

        Group "L" (Linux Mint)
        with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
    • #1878775 Reply

      mn–
      AskWoody Lounger

      Every now and then you run into annoying incompatibilities even with parts that theoretically should work together.

      One thing which has been known to fail to work properly is display mode matching in case of monitor being newer than the computer-side interface standard. DP/HDMI don’t do reliable fallback apparently. You can run into this with an old DP/HDMI output and a 4K screen, for example. Automatch fails and it tries to push too much data through something that can’t cope with those link rates… well…

      Oh well, the DVI output doesn’t have this specific problem.

    • #1878834 Reply

      MrJimPhelps
      AskWoody_MVP

      I bought two new HDMI cables, so I can have a brand new, up to date cable for each monitor.

      As a test, I plugged the new cable from my old monitor to the built-in HDMI port on my laptop. The picture was a bit fuzzy on the old monitor.

      I then plugged in the old HDMI cable from the old monitor to the Plugable Mini DisplayPort to HDMI adapter, and then plugged the adapter to the Mini DisplayPort adapter. The picture quality was excellent on the old monitor.

      I then used both a new HDMI cable and the Plugable adapter to plug my old monitor into the Mini DisplayPort jack on my laptop. The picture quality was just a hair better with the new HDMI cable than with the old HDMI cable.

      Conclusion: The most improvement for the old monitor was achieved by using a Mini DisplayPort to HDMI adapter to connect the old HDMI monitor to the Mini DisplayPort jack on the laptop. Very little improvement was achieved by using a new HDMI cable vs an old HDMI cable and then connecting the old monitor to the built in HDMI port on the laptop.

      Group "L" (Linux Mint)
      with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
    • #1879046 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Some time ago I connected for the first time a Mac to my 27″ monitor and the picture was not very good. Looking around in the Web I learned that changing from interlaced to progressive scan mode might improve things considerably and, more importantly, when I tried that I was happy with the result.

      Perhaps each of those two ports, HDMI and MDP works best in a different scan mode? One way to test this idea might be to change the settings for the HDMI terminal. Whether this can be done directly or, if not, indirectly (for example, by adjusting the display of the “second” monitor, and making sure the old monitor is always the second one when connected to the HDMI socket). I don’t know if, assuming that works, it would be practical thing to do with both monitors plugged in simultaneously, because there will then be three monitors at work: the one of the PC and the two external ones. But, if the trial shows the problem is with the choice of interlacing, then there might be some way to use this knowledge to get more satisfaction out of the same equipment.

      On the other hand, if the problem is in the HDMI socket or in whatever cables and other bits of hardware it is attached to inside the PC, my own approach would be to leave all that well alone and continue to make the best of it as it is.

      • #1879071 Reply

        MrJimPhelps
        AskWoody_MVP

        I have decided to leave well enough alone, since everything is now working so well.

        But I did want to give people an idea of something they might try if their video quality is poor — try using the Mini DisplayPort jack rather than the HDMI jack. Doesn’t make sense if you think about it, but that’s the way IT is sometimes.

        Perhaps HDMI isn’t as mature of a standard as DisplayPort. But my brand new monitor is so good that it gives excellent picture quality in spite of that fact. But the old monitor isn’t as capable as the new one, so it needs a better incoming signal, which apparently is provided via DisplayPort rather than via HDMI. That’s the only thing I can think of for now.

        Group "L" (Linux Mint)
        with Windows 8.1 running in a VM

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