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  • Bill Nye, Chromebooks, and common sense

    Home Forums AskWoody blog Bill Nye, Chromebooks, and common sense

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    This topic contains 44 replies, has 23 voices, and was last updated by  Bertram Pincus 3 months ago.

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    • #1908364 Reply

      woody
      Da Boss

      Whaddaya want to bet Bill Nye uses a Chromebook? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DS0H0XDDotI I’ve been saying it for more than four years: Unless you
      [See the full post at: Bill Nye, Chromebooks, and common sense]

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1908376 Reply

      MWmC
      AskWoody Plus

      I can give a rock-solid use case for having a Chromebook, and that’s business travel, especially across problematic borders (where they might ask you to login or even give your password). I have on several occasions used my lightweight Chromebook to conduct business overseas, and before heading to the airport i just do a “power wash” to reset the thing.

      • #1909313 Reply

        MrJimPhelps
        AskWoody_MVP

        This is the first really good reason I have ever heard for switching to a Chromebook.

        Group "L" (Linux Mint)
        with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
    • #1908411 Reply

      hitokage
      AskWoody Lounger

      You mean Bill Nye the mechanical engineer (BS from Cornell), who left Boeing to become a comedian, and then became a TV personality – all his science degrees are honorary.

      • This reply was modified 3 months ago by  hitokage. Reason: typo
      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #1908422 Reply

        Microfix
        Da Boss

        You mean Bill Bye

        woody means Bill Nye 🙂

        ********** Win7 x64/x86 | Win8.1 x64 | Linux Hybrids x64 **********

        • #1908465 Reply

          anonymous

          Oh, Bill Nye, the formr mechanical engineer at Boeing who invented the hydraulic pressure resonance suppressor tube used in 747 aircraft.

          Lol, ‘If it’s Boeing, I’m not going’.

          Now, if it had been Bill Nighy, I’d order two without another thought.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #1908655 Reply

          hitokage
          AskWoody Lounger

          Fixed it (otherwise it would have bothered me forever). I usually catch those kind of typos and edit my posts – sometimes multiple times. I got it right when I typed it in the Tags section though.

    • #1908445 Reply

      Seff
      AskWoody Plus

      What do users make of the reliability/ease of maintenance of Chromebooks? When I mentioned to my local repair technician that I was considering getting one for my wife she cautioned that they were pretty expensive to repair compared to traditional PCs.

      • #1908464 Reply

        MWmC
        AskWoody Plus

        I have NOT been gentle with my Acer Chromebook 15 (15.6″ screen). It is a little heavier than other Chromebooks, so it gets put down harder, and its size means it gets bumped more when i carry it from meeting to meeting. So far not a single problem with it, after 9 months of hard use.

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      • #1908471 Reply

        woody
        Da Boss

        I’ve been using my first-gen Chromebook Pixel for four years. My nine-year-old uses it, too.

        Never a problem. Not one.

        And if my son breaks it, eh, who cares? Get another one. Much cheaper than a phone.

        3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #1908534 Reply

        The Surfing Pensioner
        AskWoody Plus

        My 8 -year-old granddaughter has virtually taken possession of my Chromebook – which just carries on working despite all her experiments – and is now teaching me how to use it.

        funny-kid-talking-on-the-phone-5962

        Attachments:
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      • #1908895 Reply

        GreatAndPowerfulTech
        AskWoody Lounger

        As a PC repair shop owner, the biggest issues with Chromebooks is that most of them are so inexpensive that if you drop it and crack the display, you’re better off to just go by another one. Log into it and all your stuff magically returns. I’ve had a couple of the cheap ones in for service. In each case, my advice was to just purchase another cheap one. If you have a pricey one, then definitely get it fixed when it breaks.

        GreatAndPowerfulTech

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      • #1912183 Reply

        Michael432
        AskWoody_MVP

        The reliability of Chrome OS (the operating system on a Chromebook) is great. Older OSs (Windows, macOS, Linux) have poor reliability, then comes iOS and Android which are more reliable, but ChromeOS is the most reliable. It is the newest of the generally available OSs.

        On the hardware side, what you buy is what you get. Do no expect to upgrade any internal components.

        Whenever asking a techie about ChromeOS and/or Chromebooks, keep in mind that it may put them out of business. This has to color their opinion.

        Get up to speed on router security at RouterSecurity.org

        • #1912267 Reply

          rc primak
          AskWoody_MVP

          Linux in my use of it has had very good reliability. When something in Linux fails, it can fail spectacularly. But vastly most of the time, nothing fails. Chrome OS is about that reliable, if not a bit better. But the lockdown of Chrome just runs against everything I try to do with a PC or a notebook. So my Chromebook became a “Linuxbook”. Don’t get me started about how unreliable Windows has been by contrast!

          -- rc primak

    • #1908461 Reply

      Kranium
      AskWoody Lounger

      Ah, yes, the same guy who was part of the Windows ME launch.

      Group B for WIN7, Linux when I have to.

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    • #1908470 Reply

      anonymous

      “and the prospect of Google snooping even more doesn’t bother you”

      I don’t think this point is non-trivial

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    • #1908549 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Bill Nye aside, why does it make sense? It does, or it does not, depending on what one needs to use a computer for. In my case, a Chromebook would be awfully underpowered and under everything, just about. Then again, I am not an 8-year old or a granny or grandpa or someone who uses it mostly for social interaction or as a classroom aid. For those who are, and for all I know, it might be just the thing.

      Then there is the new Terminal application that gives access to the Linux command line: for someone who would like to learn Linux on a cheap computer, this would be heaven-sent. I wish that such a computer had been available all those years ago, when I wanted to learn more about Linux myself.

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group B & macOS + Linux (Mint) => Win7 Group W(?) + Mac&Lx

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      • #1912269 Reply

        rc primak
        AskWoody_MVP

        Linux will work on older, hand me down or refurbished PCs which are less expensive than buying a cheap Chromebook. Then you can do real Linux unfettered by the constraints of a proprietary “container” owned by Google or Microsoft.

        And by the way, the Linux learning adventure is as much fun as it is frustrating. Once you learn how to do a Web deep dive on occasion, it’s actually a very self-affirming experience.

        -- rc primak

    • #1908575 Reply

      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      I wonder how much Google paid Bill to recommend one. 🙂

      Nathan Parker

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      • #1908622 Reply

        dg1261
        AskWoody_MVP

        I wonder how much Google paid Bill to recommend one.

        Probably a lot less, I’d guess, than Apple has paid higher-profile celebrities to push the iPhone and Siri: Samuel L Jackson, Martin Scorcese, Zooey Deschanel, Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, Jimmy Fallon, Justin Timberlake, Bill Hader, Stephen Curry … to name a few.

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      • #1908635 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Bill Nye has his heart in the right place and, in my opinion, is also by and large one of the few TV celebrities around worth paying any attention to (yes, he sensationalizes and dramatizes the science, but that is part of the show). If he has a Chromebook and he is happy with it and then Google comes and offers him some bucks to endorse in public (assuming this happened at all) something from them that he likes, why would he refuse to do it? (Full disclosure: I don’t much care, one way or another, for Chromebooks, and his show, although I can see it has a worthwhile reason to exist, is not my kind of show, given his style of presentation; maybe I am a little too old to feel like watching it.)

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group B & macOS + Linux (Mint) => Win7 Group W(?) + Mac&Lx

        • This reply was modified 3 months ago by  OscarCP.
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    • #1908641 Reply

      “The other should be quarantined”???

      “Safely backed up in the cloud”??? (Snarkle, mumphp-giggle)

      “Just let go”???

      Of the tools you make money with? Oh, Bill, what DID they pay you! (I wish I had 10% of it.)

      If all you need is email and browsing, and trust The Cloud of Unknowing never to break when you need it, and don’t mind the GoogleSnoop Factor, or printing a lot of complex docs remotely, fine.

      If you have some serious stuff to do, like creating 2D or 3D CG or CG Animations, this ain’t for you.

      I MIGHT see having one as a backup machine when the main system goes toes up, but…it ain’t a PC.

      Sorry, Bill.

      But the prospect of having more than two smartphones, one workstation, one laptop and a Chromebook is just too much maintenance and expense.

      It almost seems a product in search of an audience, IMHO.

      A long time ago a refrigerator salesman was sent down to a small country in South America and had little success convincing the rural locals, who were living a modest agrarian lifestyle despite having electricity. After 3 months, he sent a cable back to HQ that said,

      “Coming home. Blasted people suffer from cursed wantlessness!”

      It used to be odors, a clean windshield, a shoeshine and white teeth; today it’s The Next Big Tech Thing, and more money to be spent on it.

      Hi Ho, IMHO.

      Win7 Pro SP1 64-bit, Dell Latitude E6330, Intel CORE i5 "Ivy Bridge", Group "Wait for the all-clear", Multiple Air-Gapped backup drives in different locations, "Don't check for updates-Full Manual Mode."
      --
      "...All the people, all the time..." (Peter Ustinov ad-lib from "Logan's Run")

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    • #1908675 Reply

      John
      AskWoody Lounger

      I do think Microsoft and Windows 10 have basically abandon the consumer end of PC’s. Yes you can still buy a Windows 10 Home PC but it doesn’t offer a whole lot for consumers. Honestly I think Chromebooks are a option and if Apple made a affordable Macbook they could also gain some consumers away from Windows PC’s. But I also do not see a wave coming of Chromebook buyers, it just hasn’t happened yet. Market share is still very small and whether that is because of Windows being on most PC sold, or that consumers are shy about adapting a new OS is anyone’s guess. Google obviously wants to change the fact that Chromebooks mostly are a US educational device and they want to expand that. Bill Nye for me isn’t the guy to do that, but Google isn’t much better at marketing then Microsoft.

      • #1908866 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        It could be that, these days, smart phones (iPhone and those running Android), iPads, Kindle and other readers, might get on Chromebooks’ (and any future cheaper Macs) way to mass-market dominance. For many, some of these offer all the computer power they really need and can well afford. Not to mention their greater ease of use and versatility compared to PCs (try paying with a PC at a parking meter designed to work with either smartphones or coins). If that is so, then Chromebooks are likely to remain in something of a niche market. I think that Linux, as such, is mostly used by a very different type of users (also less numerous than Windows PC or Mac buyers), so the reasons for its market ranking are quite different as well.

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group B & macOS + Linux (Mint) => Win7 Group W(?) + Mac&Lx

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    • #1908692 Reply

      F A Kramer
      AskWoody Plus

      Woody:

      When are you coming out with a new book?

      “Chromebooks for the Un-Dumb, 10 in 1” perhaps?

      That would signal the end of Windows for the Masses for sure!

      = Ax Kramer

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      • #1908783 Reply

        John
        AskWoody Lounger

        I know there are Chrome OS fans out there, and its obviously a good OS for them. But then I look at the statistics which generally show a lack of market share. I mean Linux desktops combined have twice as many users as Chrome OS. This is not a platform that is serving a lot of users even compared to Mac OS at 6% or the leader Windows at 87%. US education buys the bulk of these devices not consumers.

    • #1908821 Reply

      bbearren
      AskWoody MVP

      “and the prospect of Google snooping even more doesn’t bother you”

      The prospect of Google snooping bothers me to the extent that I use Startpage (which uses Google, but anonymizes me).  I’ve ditched Edge because of the prospect of an Edge wrapper around Chromium, and I’ve been using FireFox since Microsoft made that announcement.

      As for having a need for Windows, I use Excel daily for personal use.  I use Outlook for email.  As for startup speed, that’s a non-factor when one doesn’t shut down.  My laptop is either parked on its dock and signed out, or hibernating.  Not a lot of time involved there.

      My daily driver desktop will do a cold start into logged in and ready for use in 30 seconds.  My Windows 10 Pro with its StartIsBack++ start menu looks just like Windows 7.

      I’m still using Windows phone 10 (version 1709 10.0.15254.582) on my Microsoft/Nokia 950.  And I’ve got a Continuum dock (very portable), which makes for a fairly versatile phone.

      I have neither need nor use for a Chromebook.

      Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!
      "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Jack Sparrow
      "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns
      "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

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    • #1909311 Reply

      MrJimPhelps
      AskWoody_MVP

      Bill Nye is a salesman, not a scientist. A real scientist would give actual evidence and data; he just makes fun of those who don’t support the Google party line.

      Group "L" (Linux Mint)
      with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
      • #1910082 Reply

        Ascaris
        AskWoody_MVP

        Bill Nye is a salesman, not a scientist. A real scientist would give actual evidence and data; he just makes fun of those who don’t support the Google party line.

        He’s a paid celebrity endorser.  That’s essentially an acting gig, so he says what the script Google wrote for him indicates are his lines, or else they have him improvise around the talking points they want him to include until they get enough footage they can use to make the commercial they want.  That way, they get his “persona,” but it’s saying the words they want to be said.

        The persona that we see depicted in the image is just a character he plays.  It’s no different than any other kind of celebrity endorsement of anything else.  I can’t speak for anyone else, but I can state with some certainty that I am no more or less likely to use a Chromebook than before I heard that he endorsed them, the same as it would be for [put name of any given actor, musician, sports star, or other assorted celebrity here].

        If a Chromebook serves your needs, and you’re not worried about the Google data slurping, then it is great that you’ve found a tool that works for you.  I can’t tell anyone else what the best tools for their use-case are.  If they ask for my opinion, though, I would not recommend one without bringing up the caveat about the Google thing, as Woody did also.  The spying is a huge deal to me, but most people really do not seem to care, and I cannot impose my concern about the data slurping onto others.  I will try to persuade them to care, but if they don’t, it’s their choice to make as adults.

        I have more reservations when we’re talking about kids. I have serious problems with devices that openly spy on their users being mandated by schools that are themselves mandatory, and the lessons that the young, impressionable minds will take from that.  We older adults can weigh the privacy risks against the benefits, but the younger set will only hear that this is okay and that being spied upon has received the stamp of approval by their elders, and they will take that lesson with them into adulthood.  People our age (sadly) often give away something as valuable as their privacy away for mere baubles, but younger kids won’t even have any concept of having had any privacy to give away in the first place.

        Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.17.2).

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        • #1910771 Reply

          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          Ascaris, excellent point. Once, quite a few years ago, at a TV show on new developments on computers, the Internet and related technologies, I heard someone presented as some kind of Silicon Valley big shot and guru, say: “You no longer have any privacy, get used to it!”, or words to that effect. He was plumping for an earlier version of the “everything has to be on the Cloud” idea and had been asked about the risks to personal privacy that this might entail.

          I think that it will be a worse, poorer, more authoritarian world one where people, from their infancy on, are told, by word or by deed, to accept that “guru’s” dictum as an obvious truth that defines an inherent, inescapable part their lives in their present world. On issues such as this, I think the proper attitude is that expressed in Dylan Thomas’ poem “Do not go gently into that good night”, particularly in the line: “Rage, rage against the dying of the light!” Because, who knows, maybe not all is completely lost: so worth a try.

          Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group B & macOS + Linux (Mint) => Win7 Group W(?) + Mac&Lx

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        • #1912070 Reply

          MrJimPhelps
          AskWoody_MVP

          He’s a paid celebrity endorser. That’s essentially an acting gig, so he says what the script Google wrote for him indicates are his lines, or else they have him improvise around the talking points they want him to include until they get enough footage they can use to make the commercial they want. That way, they get his “persona,” but it’s saying the words they want to be said.

          The reason they picked Bill Nye is because he is “The Science Guy” – he has a children’s science program, so people naturally assume that he is giving an expert opinion when he talks. Because of this, they might not catch that his belittling of those of us who are justifiably concerned about the ubiquity of Google’s spying and data mining is not, in fact, a scientific opinion, but rather a veiled insult.

          Group "L" (Linux Mint)
          with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
          • #1912116 Reply

            Ascaris
            AskWoody_MVP

            Like how Al Roker has been a weatherman for so many years, including on The Weather Channel during the years when they were owned by NBC, with only a single undergrad weather course to his credit.  He has the ability to be likable and to read a teleprompter (he has a degree in communications), and he may have picked up a few things in his years of being a weatherman, but for the most part, he’s just parroting words other people have written for him.  Even so, he’s one of the best known weathermen around, and people probably mistake that for being able to speak authoritatively on the subject.  We don’t even know the names of the real authors of his words, but somehow his celebrity adds credibility to statements written by people that know far more about the weather than he does.

            Such is the nature of media.  None of this is meant to impugn Mr. Roker; he is given a job to do and he does it well.  His job does not involve being an expert on the weather, but I doubt he’s ever claimed to be one.  The people who do the actual grunt work of making his forecasts need to know about meteorology, but they don’t need to know the first thing about being an interesting TV personality on camera. It’s just a division of labor according to talent, skill, or appearance.

            This division of labor is well-tolerated within the TV news industry.  We don’t expect news presenters who are reporting on something political to be experts in political science, and we don’t expect them to be doctors if they are reporting on another outbreak of the swine flu.  With meteorology, it’s a little different, in the US at least, where most TV weathercasters are actually meteorologists.  There are examples where the division of labor is even less accepted by the public.

            Think back, if you will, to 1989, when a vocal duo called Milli Vanilli had multiple songs in the top ten at once.  They were one of the hottest things going until it was discovered that the attractive and personable duo had lip-synced every concert, and worse, had not participated in any way in the actual recording of the hit album.  Their songs were just the same as they had been when people thought Rob and Fab sang them, but it didn’t matter… people felt like they’d been duped, and the hit-making juggernaut stopped overnight, becoming the punch line of a joke instead.

            What had apparently happened was that the actual performers were deemed to not be good enough “presenters” of their songs.  Whether it was based on their looks, stage presence (or lack thereof), or some other factor, it was decided that they were good at writing and performing the songs, but not so good at dancing around and “presenting” the songs.  The producers hired some guys to do the presentation, and the actual artists apparently went along with it.  It’s not exactly the same as with Nye or Roker, as there were actual claims made that Rob and Fab were, in fact, the singers on the album, but it’s just an extension of the same idea as with the news.  The face you see speaking the lines isn’t necessarily attached to the brain that came up with them!

            Celebrity endorsements are quite common, of course, and they wouldn’t be if there was no perception that they work.  Even if I consider Michael Jordan to be authoritative on the topic of what makes a quality basketball shoe, I don’t know that the shoes that bear his name have any of those qualities.  None of the many commercials I have seen to that effect really tell me anything about what makes a good basketball shoe, or why I should buy his (especially given that I, like most buyers of his shoes, am not a basketball player).

            Ultimately, all advertising is meant to manipulate people into making purchases or decisions that they would not otherwise have made, and anyone who believes anything that seems to be presented by an authoritative voice is going to be a sitting duck for advertising executives and other salesmen, or even those peddling silly ideas like the resurgent flat-earthers, most of whom I am still not convinced actually believe any of what they say (I think we’re being trolled).

            Sadly, it doesn’t seem that teaching critical thinking is high on the list of educators at present, and that isn’t a good thing by any means.

            Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.17.2).

            • This reply was modified 3 months ago by  Ascaris.
    • #1910773 Reply

      Used to be said that “If it’s free, then you’re the product.”

      Now it seems to be “Even when you pay for it, you may STILL be the product…”

      Anyone remember “Shareware”? It’s still out there, but MUCH less than it used to be…

      Win7 Pro SP1 64-bit, Dell Latitude E6330, Intel CORE i5 "Ivy Bridge", Group "Wait for the all-clear", Multiple Air-Gapped backup drives in different locations, "Don't check for updates-Full Manual Mode."
      --
      "...All the people, all the time..." (Peter Ustinov ad-lib from "Logan's Run")

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    • #1911539 Reply

      KWGuy
      AskWoody Plus

      I agree that chromebooks have significant advantages.  BUT, don’t expect any advance warning as to when your CB is about to go EOL!!!

      I thought I had another year left on my 4 year old Dell CB.  Unfortunately, after receiving a normal automated update today, I received a not-so-normal alert stating that “this is the last update this device will receive” and then a blunt suggestion that to resolve the matter, I should upgrade to a new device!  No prior warning…no nothing.

      Unlike Windows OS’s that, with reasonable prudence,  can be used beyond their EOL due to 3rd party AV, that is not possible with CB’s.  So, it is essentially trash.  The good news is that it cost me only $300 four years ago and I have a $200 in-kind replacement on order.

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      • #1911551 Reply

        anonymous

        …So, it is essentially trash.

        It may be a task, but please try to investigate the possibility of putting a Linux distribution on that Chromebook just to get more months of use from it.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #1912077 Reply

          KWGuy
          AskWoody Plus

          An interesting possibility, but I must confess that installing linux would be task way beyond my technical abilities.  I’ve been at this a long time (still have a 5 1/4″ floppy of IBM PC-DOS v. 1.1!) so, I’m old enough to know my limitations. <grin>

          Thanks!

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        • #1912280 Reply

          rc primak
          AskWoody_MVP

          It’s actually pretty easy on Intel based Chromebooks to just take EOL Chrome OS and blow it away. (There are also ways to convert ARM Chromebooks, but this can get tricky after Chrome OS reaches EOL.)

          You do have to put substitute firmware into the Chromebook. That’s not easy. But that’s the only heavy lifting you usually need to do. Enable USB Boot, and you can run a USB Linux installer as you would do on any PC. Even partition rearrangements can be handled as if the internal storage were one big drive, once you no longer have to preserve Chrome’s strict lock-down on changing anything.

          Once installed, Linux behaves on an Intel based Chromebook just as it does on any laptop. Although, you may wish to remap the keyboard layout. If you use Gallium OS (a Ubuntu derivative) you won’t even have to do that for yourself. Though you may have no internal sound available, so a USB-C cable and a DAC to headphones device may be needed.

          So there are a couple of technical things you might want a techie friend to set up. But after that, it’s business as usual. EOL does not mean the end of usefulness for many Chromebooks.

          -- rc primak

          • This reply was modified 3 months ago by  rc primak.
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      • #1911569 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        KWGuy: Could it be that “this is the last update this device will receive” is relevant only to Google patches for your CB, not to what 3rd party AV developers, for example, may or may not do about continuing to send patches for their products? It might be that what happens will not be too different to what I think is likely happen with Windows 7 PCs patching next January: MS will stop sending new patches for them (except, maybe, in some very few, really dire situations, as happened with XP). But AV developers are not necessarily going to discontinue support for their products for Windows 7 right there and then. If they did that, they would be dropping what will still be a very substantial number of paying costumers: even if Windows 7 had actually many fewer users than Windows 10 by then, these will still be counted in the millions.

        Maybe the one reason for worrying, in the case of CBs, is that there are not nearly as many of those around as there will be PCs running Windows 7 after next January. But there might still be enough to make it unwise for 3rd party developers to give up on their users and lose their future renewal payments.

        So maybe one could be better off finding out first how things really work out after Google ends support for a CB like yours, before deciding to ditch it for a new one.

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group B & macOS + Linux (Mint) => Win7 Group W(?) + Mac&Lx

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        • #1912073 Reply

          KWGuy
          AskWoody Plus

          Thanks, OscarCP.  You raise some valid points which I will research.  It has been my understanding that for Chromebooks the AV is “baked into” the Chrome OS rather than a separate add on.

          I have several Windows computers, but my CB is used exclusively for banking/financial transactions involving a dozen or so web sites.  No surfing allowed!   I am relying on the CB’s reputation for being more secure than Windows…snooping aside.  So, got to be careful with how I proceed.

          Again, thanks for raising some possibilities.  Perhaps I can use it for less critical applications.

        • #1912288 Reply

          rc primak
          AskWoody_MVP

          There is no third party AV for Chromebooks. They rely on firmware updates and complete system lockdown. Both of which work against trying to extend the EOL. Better to blow away the firmware and Chrome OS and install substitute firmware and a full Linux distro if you can.

          -- rc primak

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          • #1912436 Reply

            There is no third party AV for Chromebooks. They rely on firmware updates and complete system lockdown. Both of which work against trying to extend the EOL. Better to blow away the firmware and Chrome OS and install substitute firmware and a full Linux distro if you can.

            Where’s the Librem 5?!  Id love to do the same to an iPhone or Android.  Jailbreaking a smartphone w/ Linux distros maybe a longtime coming, but as you note “Both of which work against trying to extend the EOL”.  De facto corp policy for everything  🙁

    • #1912083 Reply

      b
      AskWoody Plus

      “So what, or maybe who, is the Chromebook good for?” I asked.

      “Elementary school,” he said. “Older than that, get Windows. Especially if you want the laptop to last. Chromebooks don’t last.”

      Windows or Chromebook? A Best Buy salesman told me it isn’t even close

      Knuckle dragger Cannon fodder Chump Daft glutton Idiot Crazy/Ignorant Toxic drinker Blockhead Unwashed mass Seeker/Sucker "Ancient/Obsolete" (Group ASAP) Win10 v.1909

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      • #1912148 Reply

        Ascaris
        AskWoody_MVP

        There are better sources of information than Best Buy salesmen.  I’d put Woody’s opinion on a much higher level than a salesman (anywhere) or a paid shill like Nye (aka “a salesman”), even though in this case I do not agree with Woody as much as I do with the actual salesman in question.

        One thing about that, though.  There are plenty of “Chromebooks, except with Windows” for sale at outlets like Best Buy.  I have one, for which I paid $180 about a year and a half ago (now running Linux).  These are those low-spec laptops that come with 32GB of eMMC storage, which is plenty for a “store it in the cloud” Chromebook, but woefully inadequate for a Windows installation.  If you’re talking about the same price point as a low-spec Chromebook, which appears to be the most commonly sold kind of Chromebook, you’re going to have a worse experience with Windows on that hardware than if you’d gotten the version with the Chrome firmware and OS.  The Windows version may be able to do more in theory, but if your primary (or only) need is to have a vehicle to get to the web, a Chromebook will do it faster and better on the same hardware as compared to Windows.  If all you want is to run Chrome, and you don’t care about all of your data being slurped up (which is evident in the whole “want to run Chrome” bit), all of that extra utility that Windows brings to the table pales in comparison to the negatives.

        Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.17.2).

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        • #1912295 Reply

          rc primak
          AskWoody_MVP

          Windows on a Chromebook has been abandoned. Google no longer sanctions this option. Guess why?

          -- rc primak

          1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #1912406 Reply

          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          I recall Susan having some, by now famous troubles celebrated in song in her longest and still on-going saga, trying to run Windows on a machine with a 32-GB disk.

          Special thanks to rc primac for clarifying the fact that CBs have their antivirus wrapped around the hardware, so to speak, and can only be updated by Google while Google still supports the CBs.

          Also, I imagine that Bill Nye still likes CBs and does not have to worry about their unnaturally early demise, because he has the attic stacked to the rafters with CBs, received as a part-payment for his great performance (and I really mean that) on behalf of Google.

          Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group B & macOS + Linux (Mint) => Win7 Group W(?) + Mac&Lx

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    Reply To: Bill Nye, Chromebooks, and common sense

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