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  • Brave Browser

    This topic contains 8 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  anonymous 3 weeks, 3 days ago.

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    • #1958349 Reply

      anonymous

      I don’t know if I am in the right place but I have a query and would like your opinion on Brave Browser.

      Is it a good browser?

      Is it safe?

      Is it reliable?

      Would you recommend it?

      Thanks for taking the time to read and hopefully respond.

      Linda

      Moderator note:  Moved from Getting Started  to Other Browsers forum.

    • #1958361 Reply

      MrJimPhelps
      AskWoody_MVP

      I have used Brave in the past, and I liked it. I normally use Opera as my “alternative” browser, but I decided to install Brave and try it again, and it is fast.

      I think you will be just fine with Brave.

      Group "L" (Linux Mint)
      with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
    • #1958404 Reply

      anonymous

      Yes it is reliable browser.

      Brave is based on Google’s technology so it is fast but natively blocks some third party scripts. You will have to configure it in settings because some default settings are just like Google’s own Chrome.

    • #1958983 Reply

      anonymous

      Fast and reliable describes Chromium browsers in general, including the new Edge from Microsoft. So I looked to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brave_%28web_browser%29 to find what makes Brave different from an outside source.

      Beyond being a fast and reliable browser that functions like other Chromiums, Brave has a declared purpose. You may be an enthusiast for a new marketing plan to fund content you find interesting. You may see the Basic Attention Token as a novel twist to Multi Level Marketing. Whichever way you view the plan, you should be aware of the plan. And your participation in the experiment when using the Brave browser.

      • #1959013 Reply

        anonymous

        A user can chose to not participate in the Multi-level marketing scheme.

        • #1959100 Reply

          anonymous

          Sure, but to decide one way or the other first the user must be informed of why the option is significant. Taking part in the experiment may help find a better way to fund content. But if a user decides they disagree with the purpose, they may be more comfortable with another Chromium browser, like Edge or even Chrome.

    • #1959125 Reply

      Microfix
      Da Boss

      One thing that concerns me about brave, is integrating popular security browser extensions, yes it sounds great on the surface, however, the option of being modular is still my preferred choice for my security in any browser YMMV

      Have tried/tested Brave and like any other browser, it still needs attention/research.
      I’d recommend doing the following at/post install:

      1. custom install (via webinstaller – have always had an utter dislike for these things)
      2. check chrome//flag settings – Prior Internet research
      3. check settings thoroughly – I turned off the rewards scheme for my testing

      First impressions once tweaked was, it’s certainly fast online which is unsurprising due to the amount of browser connections. Uncomfortable with the homepage which showed the amount of data saved/ items blocked (cumulatively) on every startup of the browser..it didn’t put me at ease when browsing. Some of their ‘security’ integration didn’t do it for me so, I disabled them and installed extensions from the chrome web store. Surfing was fast but something just didn’t feel right…gut feeling. Within three days I uninstalled it..just didn’t get comfortable with it coming from a decades old mozilla background.

      Once uninstalled, I found remnants of brave in the registry/program files/program data folders that needed a thorough purge using 3rd party cleaners and manual registry editing. Their uninstall certainly needed attention but, thereagain, probably think that once you install it you won’t go elsewhere..

      If you come from a blink rendering browser background, brave will probably be a good choice as opposed to Chrome. Some other chromium based hybrid browsers also state that they conform to GDPR whereas brave seems to point to the EU for some privacy aspects within their browser.

      brave privacy

      More options are available for other secure browsers

      ********** Win7 x64/x86 | Win8.1 x64 | Linux Hybrids x64 **********

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1959140 Reply

      Purg2
      AskWoody Lounger

      Ha, this topic jarred something loose.

      I hadn’t done much with it on my initial test run earlier this summer.  So this topic helped me go a step further.

      My opinion is that it’s a decent browser for those that are thinking about something new.

      The extensions were what I didn’t get into the first go around.  This is what I discovered about that just now.

      Brave uses the chrome web store.  So as long as a person is OK with that, the warning can be ignored.

      Tampermonkey performed as desired.  Now I gotta try another one, just for giggles.

      One can test drive the portable version for easy disposal should things not work out.  It’s the one I was using in this experiment.

      https://portapps.io/app/brave-portable/

      Good luck with the “brave” adventure.

      Win 8.1 Group B, Linux Dabbler

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1960302 Reply

      anonymous

      Thanks to all for your posts about Brave browser.

    Please follow the -Lounge Rules- no personal attacks, no swearing, and politics/religion are relegated to the Rants forum.

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