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  • Bumps on the road to the Win10 version 2004 upgrade

    Home Forums AskWoody blog Bumps on the road to the Win10 version 2004 upgrade

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      • #2269587 Reply
        woody
        Da Boss

        I see the same pattern, every time Microsoft releases a new version of Windows. This time’s even more bizarre than usual: Microsoft won’t install vers
        [See the full post at: Bumps on the road to the Win10 version 2004 upgrade]

        3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2269608 Reply
        Sproots
        AskWoody Lounger

        Was this stated from the start that MS was going to limit once again to new hardware?

        • #2269609 Reply
          b
          AskWoody Plus

          No, because it isn’t. What does “once again” refer to?

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2269614 Reply
        bbearren
        AskWoody MVP

        Do yourself a favor. If Windows Update gives you the opportunity to “Download and install” Win10 version 2004, say a prayer for the cannon fodder (we appreciate their problem reports!) and resist the urge to click.

        I believe “cannon fodder” is a misnomer for those of us who update as soon as an update is available..  “Cannon fodder—soldiers, especially infantrymen, who run the greatest risk of being wounded or killed in warfare.”  Most of us are running no risk whatsoever.

        From Susan’s blog post, “Bottom line: Protecting your PC from problematic updates is no different from fending off other threats and failures. Always have a current and thorough system backup!” “… is no different …”. Exactly. Nothing beats a current and thorough system backup (drive imaging is my method of choice) for getting out of Windows/PC/laptop problems of any kind. One can literally turn back the clock.

        Where’s the great risk?  It literally takes only six minutes for me to boot to the B side of my desktop and restore the OS drive image to the A side of my desktop.  It takes all of 45 seconds to boot back to the A side.  Again, where’s the great risk?

        “Bottom line: Protecting your PC from problematic updates is no different from fending off other threats and failures. Always have a current and thorough system backup!”

        The only thing I have to report on 2004 is that it is noticeably quicker than 1909.  All else is nominal.

        Create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates, in case you need to start over!
        "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns
        "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

        • This reply was modified 4 weeks ago by bbearren. Reason: context and clarity
        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2269636 Reply
          KWGuy
          AskWoody Plus

          Bbearren, you ask “where’s the great risk?”  I understand that from your perspective this is a reasonable position for you to take.  I’ve no doubt that you’ve forgotten more about the Windows OS that I could ever hope to know.  I commend and envy your expertise in all things backup and recovery.  But, therein lies the problem.

          Not all of us (and certainly including myself!) have your level of expertise and the time and/or capacity to reach your level.  Therefore, for folks like myself there is definitely a great risk when dealing with updates.  Yes, I can and do make system image backups (manually, because I wouldn’t know how to automate the process.)  But, I wouldn’t know the first thing about A side and B side dual boot desktops.  Likewise, recovering from an update induced unbootable computer would, for me, be a major concern.

          My lack of ability is not your concern, nor should it be.  I simply wish to respectfully offer a counter argument to your suggestion that there is no risk.  Were it only that simple!

          • #2269638 Reply
            cyberSAR
            AskWoody Plus

            Not all of us (and certainly including myself!) have your level of expertise and the time and/or capacity to reach your level.

            Nor the desire – for almost all of my clients. They just want to turn on the machine and go to work. I think Bbearren gives great input and is a good counterpoint to many posts here but it comes down to what the average user should expect and I think MS has failed at that since Win 8, in my opinion.

            1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #2269653 Reply
            bbearren
            AskWoody MVP

            Not all of us (and certainly including myself!) have your level of expertise and the time and/or capacity to reach your level. Therefore, for folks like myself there is definitely a great risk when dealing with updates.

            I should have been more succinct.  When I say “most of us”, I mean most of us who do go ahead and install the update when it’s made available, like @b, @RetiredGeek, @Woody and others here at AskWoody.  I’ve edited my post to better reflect that.

            For those of us who are prepared and practiced in the methods, there is no risk, we are not “cannon fodder”, our computers are in no danger.

            Not everyone here at AskWoody is at the same skill level, nor am I expecting that.  We all have our own reasons for doing the things that we do.  I’m not saying that everyone should do as I do, I’m just saying that what I do does not involve any risk, which undermines the label “cannon fodder”.

            Create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates, in case you need to start over!
            "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns
            "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

            • This reply was modified 4 weeks, 1 day ago by bbearren.
            • This reply was modified 4 weeks ago by bbearren. Reason: clarity
        • #2270195 Reply
          Elly
          AskWoody MVP

          believe “cannon fodder” is a misnomer for those of us who update as soon as an update is available.. “Cannon fodder—soldiers, especially infantrymen, who run the greatest risk of being wounded or killed in warfare.”

          When you look at how Microsoft decided to implement updates on W10, W10 Home users are the cannon fodder. That has become somewhat obscured over time… but W10 Home users have the least control over Windows updating, while also being the least technically skilled and able to recover when buggy updates hit their systems… so the description of them running the greatest risk of being wounded or killed would be quite accurate.

          The simplest way for a non-techy person to avoid being cannon-fodder has been to wait for others to install the updates, find the bugs, and wait for fixes, before installing it themselves. That is the DEFCON system.

          Microsoft, and those that embrace their current automatic updating, have willingly sacrificed W10 Home users, to do the bug detection for them. Touting that it is okay to risk your time, your hardware does not take into consideration the consequences for non-techy Home users. An operating system should be stable and safe, especially for Home users. They should have the most stable, secure OS… not be pushed into the newest, least stable version, purposefully by Microsoft… and yes… there are bugs…

          I’m grateful to the W10 folks here that step up and check out the new versions for the rest of us… but it is reckless to suggest that it is best for the non-techy types. Give me a couple of years of no-problem updating, on our machines, and I might buy it. Maybe Microsoft is headed that way… but hasn’t happened yet.

          Non-techy Win 10 Pro and Linux Mint experimenter

          2 users thanked author for this post.
          • #2270201 Reply
            bbearren
            AskWoody MVP

            I’m grateful to the W10 folks here that step up and check out the new versions for the rest of us… but it is reckless to suggest that it is best for the non-techy types.

            When I say “most of us”, I mean most of us who do go ahead and install the update when it’s made available, like @b, @RetiredGeek, @Woody and others here at AskWoody. I’ve edited my post to better reflect that. For those of us who are prepared and practiced in the methods, there is no risk, we are not “cannon fodder”, our computers are in no danger. Not everyone here at AskWoody is at the same skill level, nor am I expecting that. We all have our own reasons for doing the things that we do. I’m not saying that everyone should do as I do, I’m just saying that what I do does not involve any risk, which undermines the label “cannon fodder”.

            Create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates, in case you need to start over!
            "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns
            "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

          • #2270205 Reply
            Kathy Stevens
            AskWoody Plus

            It has come to the point where we should all be advising our non technically oriented friends to consider alternative to Windows operating systems.

            And, I am now growing to understand why schools and universes  are driving their students to Apple machines.

            • #2270217 Reply
              cyberSAR
              AskWoody Plus

              I can tell you that at least 50% of my clients have abandoned windows machines at home and use ipads and iphones.

            • #2270227 Reply
              bbearren
              AskWoody MVP

              It has come to the point where we should all be advising our non technically oriented friends to consider alternative to Windows operating systems. And, I am now growing to understand why schools and universes are driving their students to Apple machines.

              There is a reason (are reasons) that I (and some others here) have not had issues with Windows 10 updates, and I’m still working on puzzling that out.  I have five installations, from two straight-from-Microsoft’s-playbook to one partially customized but with Microsoft-approved methods to one heavily customized but still with Microsoft-approved methods to one completely off Microsoft’s reservation.

              All are Windows 10 Pro, all have driver updates disabled via Group Policy, all are on Automatic Update, and I also check for updates almost daily.  Sometimes I forget.  I have all my routine maintenance setup on Task Scheduler, including my weekly drive images.

              There are two more areas where my installations differ from those of the majority here.  Mine are all fully and timely updated with everything Microsoft has to offer, and I’ve used registry editing to strip out all of the “Special Folders” from Windows File Explorer, and they all use the StartIsBack++ Start Menu.  My only AV/AM are Windows Defender and Malwarebytes Premium, which dance very well together.

              My Dell Latitude E5420 was new in 2011, the motherboard/CPU for my DIY desktop and NAS were new in 2013.  I have upgraded to mostly SSD’s, but everything except the laptop has HDD’s also.  I have had only very minor issues, they were very few and far between, and easily solved.  I have never had an unexpected update during my set Active Hours.

              Yes I have the methods and experience to fix problems, but I don’t get the problems in the first place.  And no, it’s not a charmed life.  AskWoody is a bit of a silo-type of microcosm.  There simply are not tens of millions or hundreds of millions of people having insurmountable technical difficulties with Windows 10.  Even the tech sites don’t get into tens of thousands; it’s always anecdotal numbers and/or reddit contributors, maybe into the hundreds.

              I’m not saying that everyone should do as I do, or that everyone can do as I do, not by a long shot.  I’m not saying to abandon the MSDEFCON system.  I’m only saying that I haven’t been having any of those problems since Windows 10 was RTM, and I don’t duck. dodge or postpone any updates.

              We all have our reasons for doing the things that we do, and I’m not an IT Pro riding herd of gobs of PC’s/laptops.  I consider myself an experienced user, and I keep doing what I do because it has proven to work for me and my systems.

              Create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates, in case you need to start over!
              "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns
              "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

        • #2270200 Reply
          Elly
          AskWoody MVP

          believe “cannon fodder” is a misnomer for those of us who update as soon as an update is available.. “Cannon fodder—soldiers, especially infantrymen, who run the greatest risk of being wounded or killed in warfare.”

          When you look at how Microsoft decided to implement updates on W10, W10 Home users are the cannon fodder. That has become somewhat obscured over time… but W10 Home users have the least control over Windows updating, while also being the least technically skilled and able to recover when buggy updates hit their systems… so the description of them running the greatest risk of being wounded or killed would be quite accurate.

          The term cannon-fodder does not apply to early adapters who are tech oriented, willing and able to experiment, and have the capacity to restore their systems.

          Non-techy Win 10 Pro and Linux Mint experimenter

          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #2270215 Reply
            b
            AskWoody Plus

            The term cannon-fodder does not apply to early [adopters] who are tech oriented, willing and able to experiment, and have the capacity to restore their systems.

            Who else is Woody referring to when he uses that term?

            If Windows Update gives you the opportunity to “Download and install” Win10 version 2004, say a prayer for the cannon fodder (we appreciate their problem reports!) and resist the urge to click.

            1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2269615 Reply
        geekdom
        AskWoody Plus

        This particular desktop computer was built locally by a small computer firm less than a year past. How new must the computer be for updates to install?

        G{ot backup} TestBeta
        offline▸ Win7Pro SP1 x64 Storage
        online▸ Win10Pro 1909.18363.900 x64 i5-9400 RAM8GB HDD Firefox79.0b3 Windows{Image/Defender/Firewall}
        • #2269616 Reply
          Alex5723
          AskWoody Plus

          This particular desktop computer was built locally by a small computer firm less than a year past. How new must the computer be for updates to install?

          The PC maybe new but not so the drivers..Just look at Intel’s Optane which even after months of beta testing 2004 wasn’t ready for the upgrade.

        • #2269618 Reply
          bbearren
          AskWoody MVP

          This particular desktop computer was built locally by a small computer firm less than a year past. How new must the computer be for updates to install?

          You’re misreading Woody’s blog post.

          “Microsoft won’t install version 2004 on any of its latest hardware”

          Microsoft won’t install version 2004 on any of Microsoft’s latest hardware.

          My motherboard/CPU is around 7 years old, and I’m running 2004 just fine.  Also as an aside, I never update drivers unless I’m having an issue with the hardware that driver supports, or the newer driver adds features that I need to that particular hardware.  I have Group Policy set to exclude driver updates from Windows Update, but I don’t hinder or pause Windows Update in any other way; it runs automatically.

          Create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates, in case you need to start over!
          "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns
          "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2269622 Reply
        cyberSAR
        AskWoody Plus

        I upgraded my 3 year-old workstation for the heck of it early this week just to play with it, even though it had a hold on it. Machine ran fine. 2 goofy little issues that weren’t deal breakers, but I found nothing that made my experience better than 1909. Matter of fact, I just restored my 1909 image because I don’t plan on updating my clients to 2004 anytime soon. I try to run almost everything the same as the majority of my clients so I get hit with any issues before them… hopefully. Just my $.02

        3 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2269626 Reply
          Microfix
          AskWoody MVP

          @cyberSAR, good client/consultant policy there.
          As for ‘Goofy’ and W10 2004 not offered via WU, it ‘disney’ work right for a reason 🙂

          | Win8.1 Pro x64 | Linux Hybrids x86/x64 | Win7 Pro x86/x64 Offline |
          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2269629 Reply
        geekdom
        AskWoody Plus

        Diagnostic messages included with “your device isn’t quite ready for it” stating the problem and which devices are affected would be useful.

        G{ot backup} TestBeta
        offline▸ Win7Pro SP1 x64 Storage
        online▸ Win10Pro 1909.18363.900 x64 i5-9400 RAM8GB HDD Firefox79.0b3 Windows{Image/Defender/Firewall}
        5 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2270065 Reply
          MWmC
          AskWoody Plus

          Isn’t it astonishing how many basic things Microsoft gets wrong? Just this morning I was noting, for the umpteenth time, that the Microsoft Store (at least on Windows 10 Pro) tells you when something was first put on the store, but not the date of its latest update … you have to go hunting for that information elsewhere.

          [My comment about Microsoft screw-ups doesn’t apply to Azure-related technology. I am an enthusiastic user and supporter of Azure Cloud and Azure DevOps.]

          If the update tools determines the machine isn’t ready for 2004, it must be comparing current factors against requirements. Share that information, Microsoft!

      • #2269647 Reply
        b
        AskWoody Plus

        Microsoft won’t install version 2004 on any of Microsoft’s latest hardware

        Any of the latest?

        Version 2004 seems fine on the only two Surface devices released this year.

        And on most of the 20 currently supported models; so it’s fine on 88% of Surfaces in use.

        The “Update is on its way” message doesn’t make any sense

        Why are people who don’t want 2004 until next year upset that they can’t have it last week?

        Intel-based machines with Optane memory are getting crushed

        Intel published a resolution for their driver issue months before the release of version 2004:
        How to Resolve Intel® Optane™ Memory Pinning Error: ‘Unable to load DLL ‘iaStorAfsServiceApi.dll”

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2269770 Reply
          KYKaren
          AskWoody Plus

          I have read the Intel resolution, and I have a question about it:

          Even if the random error message has never appeared on my system in version 1909 and earlier and even though I have a driver that is later than 17.5.0.1017, does this Intel information mean that the resolution is applicable and should be done BEFORE updating to version 2004?

          My Intel Optane Pinning Explorer Extensions driver is 17.5.9.1040, updated 4/30/2020.

          Offline: Win7Pro ∙ SP1 ∙ x64
          Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-6500U ∙ RAM 12GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender
          Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-8565U ∙ RAM 16GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender

          • #2269810 Reply
            b
            AskWoody Plus

            If you don’t have an older version under Software components in Device manager, then no action should be necessary. The workaround would be needed if you ever had a version earlier than 17.5.0.1017. You could leave it until you see the error message after upgrade, but it should only take a couple of minutes to refresh the new and remove the old versions.

            1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2269657 Reply
        Kathy Stevens
        AskWoody Plus

        Why can’t Microsoft just leave us alone.

        Think about it. I am sitting in my home office surround by a computer museum containing desk tops dating back as 1985. In addition, I have two Windows 10 notebooks (I got rid of the older notebooks). In short, there are seven computers in the office and all of them work and are used for specific tasks.

        Of the desk tops, two have been upgraded from Windows 7 Professional to Windows 10 Professional and one was delivered with Windows 10 Home and since upgraded to Pro.

        And all of the machines work.

        The collection includes:

        Leading Edge Model D

        • Year Purchased 1985
        • MS-DOS 2.11
        • Intel 8088 microprocessor at 4.77 MHz
        • 512 RAM
        • two 360 KB
        • MS-DOS programs on the primary floppy drive and work files on the secondary drive
        • Amber monochrome CRT monitor.

        Sony VAIO PCV-RS220 (2003)

        • Year Purchased 2003
        • Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition
        • Intel Pentium 4 processor running at 2.53GHz
        • 512MB of 266MHz DDR memory
        • Intel’s integrate 845G graphics
        • 120GB 7200 rpm ATA-100 Hard Drive

        Sony Vaio 430G

        • Year Purchased 2004
        • Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition
        • Intel 2.80-GHz Pentium 4 (Hyper-Threading),
        • 512 MB RAM,
        • 120 GB Hard Drive

        Lenovo ThinkStation E20 (two machines)

        • Year Purchased 2010
        • Windows 7 Professional 64-bit upgraded to Windows 10
        • Intel Core i3-540(3.06GHz) 64 bit Dual Core Processor
        • 4GB UDIMM 1333MHz DDR3 RAM
        • 500GB 7200rpm SATA drive
        • NVIDIA Quadro FX580 (512MB) graphics

        HP ENVY Desktop – 795-0050

        • Year Purchased 2019
        • Windows 10 Home upgraded to Pro 64-bit
        • Intel i7 – 8700 CPU,
        • 16 GB RAM,
        • NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060 (3 GB) graphics card

        Now when you think about it, each machine has a different hardware configuration and drivers of various vintages. Add to that an incredible number of applications and you can begin to understand the complexity of releasing a new version of Windows 10 that will work on all of our Windows 10 machines. Then think about the millions  of Windows PCs that are out there

        Bottom line. Microsoft should restrict its updates to security related issues for existing computers and release new versions of Windows for new builds.

        No, we will not be installing Windows 10 on computers purchased prior to 2010 but then again, we plan on using our post 2010 computer for some time to come and do not want Microsoft to throw a monkey wrench into our existing fleet of computers.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2269665 Reply
          b
          AskWoody Plus

          Now when you think about it, each machine has a different hardware configuration and drivers of various vintages. Add to that an incredible number of applications and you can begin to understand the complexity of releasing a new version of Windows 10 that will work on all of our Windows 10 machines. Then think about the millions of Windows PCs that are out there

          Glad you appreciate Microsoft’s efforts to keep your 10-year-old computers running smoothly on Windows 10 after free upgrades.

          • #2269675 Reply
            Kathy Stevens
            AskWoody Plus

            You misunderstood the point.

            Windows 7 worked perfectly well for years.

            Now, I have to lift the hood of our computers to figure out why the systems are not working as intended after a Windows 10 update.

            And then comes Windows 2004.

            No, I do not appreciate Microsoft’s efforts to keep our 10-year-old computers running by installing updates that potentially break our systems.

            I want a machine where I do not have to be tinkering with the operating system at the expense of using the computer for work.

            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #2269682 Reply
              b
              AskWoody Plus

              Any update can potentially break things. It happened with Windows 7 too.

              The question is, how often does it actually happen to anyone we know.

              Windows 10 has also worked perfectly for years for millions.

              If you don’t like Windows 10, why did you upgrade from 7?

              • #2269702 Reply
                Kathy Stevens
                AskWoody Plus

                We are taking a different route.

                After decades of depending on Microsoft operating systems, we are taking delivery of Linux and Apple machines mid-month and will see if we can make a transition away from Microsoft products altogether.

                 

                 

                 

                2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2269692 Reply
        NetDef
        AskWoody_MVP

        I’ve not had any problems at all with the systems that accepted the 20.04 update automatically.  One notable system is my sons PC:  an eight year old custom built hand-me-down featuring a Sandy Bridge 2600K CPU.  Which oddly enough now feels notably faster than it did on 1909.

        Still have some Lenovo laptops of varying age that say the update it not ready for them.

        ~ Group "Weekend" ~

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2269698 Reply
          NetDef
          AskWoody_MVP

          I should note that none of the systems I own, or that I’ve spec’ed out for clients, have Intel’s Optane enabled nor available.  I have personally not been impressed with the feature — it feels like a performance band-aid for a poorly designed system.  Would rather put a little more investment into NVMe SSD main drives on high performance systems than an (expensive limited) cache.

          ~ Group "Weekend" ~

      • #2269699 Reply
        Carl D
        AskWoody Lounger

        Well, after a week of running a clean install of 2004 the only ‘bug’ I’ve seen is the “amnesia” one where Windows “forgets” that Defragment and Optimize drives has been run.

        And, it isn’t just me – I’ve now seen reports on various Windows forums of people experiencing this same issue. I guess most people just let Windows handle this automatically and never bother to check this particular function to see if it has been run.

        Someone on another forum said that it doesn’t just happen after a reboot either – if you check a short time after running it you’ll find Windows reports that it has never been run and your drives/partitions need optimizing or defragmenting (depending on whether you have HD’s or SSD’s, of course).

        Doesn’t cause a problem as I’ve said in a previous post in another thread but this sort of thing doesn’t really inspire confidence – if Windows “forgets” something like this then what else is it “forgetting”?

        This isn’t what one would expect to see in an operating system that’s been available for 5 years now.

        Gigabyte GA-B250M-D3H Motherboard, Intel i5-7600 CPU, 32GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 850 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 2004 64bit.

      • #2269709 Reply
        geekdom
        AskWoody Plus

        Searching for clues about the message, @abbodi86 came up with a startling discovery – it looks as if the message is controlled by the “UNP Campaign Manager,” WaaSMedic service, and/or WAAS Assessment/UpdateOrchestrator. Clicking Check for updates doesn’t make any difference, nor does clicking Resume updates.

        WaaSMedic, from brief reading research, is Windows Update repair software. What is the connection between the repair tool and the message device not ready?

        G{ot backup} TestBeta
        offline▸ Win7Pro SP1 x64 Storage
        online▸ Win10Pro 1909.18363.900 x64 i5-9400 RAM8GB HDD Firefox79.0b3 Windows{Image/Defender/Firewall}
      • #2269710 Reply
        Cameochi
        AskWoody Plus

        Update 2004 installed okay on my XPS 8930 but it sounded a bit loud afterward. I had checked the Intel drivers manually but….that uses Microsoft Update. I then installed SetupRST  (Rapid Storage) from Intel and that fixed that issue. Then I got a notification that there was an update. It is the Intel SSD Toolbox and it fixes everything! It scans your computer and tells you exactly what you have and when it finished my system started running like new again. Anyone who is having Intel issues needs to check the Rapid Storage and install the SSD Toolbox directly from Intel (no 3rd parties). On a separate note, I no longer allow Windows to install automatic updates. I use the Microsoft Catalog as it runs a compatibility check and won’t install anything that will cause harm. Hope this helps. 🙂

        • This reply was modified 4 weeks, 1 day ago by Cameochi.
      • #2269715 Reply
        otto
        AskWoody Plus

        Is it possible that some pc’s are more vulnerable  than others? I have a Dell XPS 8930 with intel i7-8700 with Optane memory. I had no problems with the down load. I did have an issue with the Intel pinning file. I ran Dell’s support assistant and installed the intel update and have had no problems since .

        • #2269771 Reply
          KYKaren
          AskWoody Plus

          Was the Intel update you mention the Intel-Rapid-Storage-Technology-Driver-and-Management-Console Driver version 17.5.9.1040?

          Offline: Win7Pro ∙ SP1 ∙ x64
          Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-6500U ∙ RAM 12GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender
          Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-8565U ∙ RAM 16GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender

      • #2269716 Reply
        Cameochi
        AskWoody Plus

        A

        Update 2004 installed okay on my XPS 8930 but it sounded a bit loud afterward. I had checked the Intel drivers manually but….that uses Microsoft Update. I then installed SetupRST  (Rapid Storage) from Intel and that fixed that issue. Then I got a notification that there was an update. It is the Intel SSD Toolbox and it fixes everything! It scans your computer and tells you exactly what you have and when it finished my system started running like new again. Anyone who is having Intel issues needs to check the Rapid Storage and install the SSD Toolbox directly from Intel (no 3rd parties). On a separate note, I no longer allow Windows to install automatic updates. I use the Microsoft Catalog as it runs a compatibility check and won’t install anything that will cause harm. Hope this helps. 🙂

        • This reply was modified 4 weeks, 1 day ago by Cameochi.

        An update to my Intel post.  Here is the direct link to get the Intel SSd Toolbox. 🙂
        Intel® Driver & Support Assistant

        • #2269723 Reply
          b
          AskWoody Plus

          An update to my Intel post.  Here is the direct link to get the Intel SSd Toolbox. 🙂
          Intel® Driver & Support Assistant

          That’s a different program

      • #2269718 Reply
        KYKaren
        AskWoody Plus

        Mayank Parmar has released new information, dated June 6, about Intel’s Optane and v2004 on Windows Latest

        Offline: Win7Pro ∙ SP1 ∙ x64
        Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-6500U ∙ RAM 12GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender
        Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-8565U ∙ RAM 16GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender

      • #2269873 Reply
        John
        AskWoody Lounger

        No matter what OS we are talking about, they all seem to have problems that have to be resolved with a major upgrade release. I don’t think any of these releases are cause to be in a hurry to install them.

        • #2269881 Reply
          Kathy Stevens
          AskWoody Plus

          Do you mean that all operating systems have problems following major upgrades or all Microsoft Windows operating systems have major problems?

          We are exploring alternatives to Microsoft systems and have on order an Apple MacPro7,1 that uses macOS Catalina as its operating system.

          Are you saying that we will have the same problems with the Mac as we are having with our Windows 10 machines?

          • #2269883 Reply
            PKCano
            Da Boss

            Not! Macs are so much less stressful.

            1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #2269889 Reply
            Microfix
            AskWoody MVP

            as are linux distro updates 😉

            | Win8.1 Pro x64 | Linux Hybrids x86/x64 | Win7 Pro x86/x64 Offline |
            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #2269896 Reply
              Kathy Stevens
              AskWoody Plus

              We also have a Linux machine on order but are concerned with respect to it ability to support the software that is the core of our analysis and the strength of the organization that stands behind the operating system.

              We will see.

      • #2270061 Reply
        MWmC
        AskWoody Plus

        I avoid Intel CPUs at all costs, so it seems I’ll be safe for a while from 2004, since I presume they sort out the Intel problems before turning their attention to AMD-based machines. But I second the motion (above) that Microsoft provide some sort of diagnostic capability so we can understand what the hold up is on a machine-by-machine basis.

      • #2270098 Reply
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        Intel published a resolution for their driver issue months before the release of version 2004:
        How to Resolve Intel® Optane™ Memory Pinning Error: ‘Unable to load DLL ‘iaStorAfsServiceApi.dll”

        Who out of millions of windows 10 users knows about that hidden resolution ? Why wasn’t it pushed via WU (like Intel Microcode) to every Optane user before the release of 2004 or why isn’t that resolution been part of 2004 upgrade ?

        That bring again Woody’s question : What really Microsoft’s telemetry good for.

      • #2270306 Reply
        Microfix
        AskWoody MVP

        Another issue which has been raised with w10 2004 is, DVB satellite reciever drivers:

        Users who use DVB receivers (SAT TV) via appropriate TV cards or TV receiver sticks should not upgrade to Windows 10 version 2004. There are probably serious issues with drivers, the Windows Filtering Platform and the digital data streams..

        *my bolding

        more info over on borncity

        | Win8.1 Pro x64 | Linux Hybrids x86/x64 | Win7 Pro x86/x64 Offline |
      • #2270309 Reply
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        It’s not a recent issue, as the same error occurred on 1803/1809 and 1903/1909:

        Intel® Optane™ Memory Pinning Error: ‘Unable to load DLL ‘iaStorAfsServiceApi.dll

        But I don’t know why Intel didn’t fix it about a year ago, as their changes caused it.

        So, installing Intel Optane fix will turn 2004 into being compatible with PCs using Optane as Microsoft will recognize the fix ?

        • #2270385 Reply
          b
          AskWoody Plus

          So, installing Intel Optane fix will turn 2004 into being compatible with PCs using Optane as Microsoft will recognize the fix ?

          Version 2004 was never incompatible with PCs using Optane.

          Intel RST driver caused an error after any feature update.

      • #2273117 Reply
        howardagoldberg
        AskWoody Plus

        A Tale of Three Dells … (just sharing some ‘telemetry’ from someone serving as cannon fodder):

        NOTE: All three of these systems were/are on 1909 64-bit, fully patched.

        Dell 1: Inspiron 15 5578 2-in-1 purchased in 2017 (3 years old). This is a system that is only used on occasion (it used to be my son’s, who as a graphic design major needed to move to a Mac), but I boot it up at least once a month to install updates, etc. Last week, when applying the ‘Patch Tuesday’ updates, I was immediately offered the ‘Download and Install’ option for 2004. The upgrade took about 3 hours total (with a standard spinning drive, not a SSD). As far as I can tell, zero issues to report (checked against reported issues from this forum such as right-click start menu items, sound, etc.).

        Dell 2: Inspiron 7353 2-in-1 purchased in 2016 (4 years old). Within days of ‘2004’ becoming official, I have had the notice in Windows Update of ‘ … 2004 is coming, but your computer is not quite ready … there is nothing more you need to do now.’ This is a fully patched systems (including last Tuesday’s patches). The only thing I can see that might be an issue is the sound drivers are from Conexant, but my drivers are not in the range stated by Microsoft for their hold.

        Dell 3: XPS 15 (L501x) purchased in 2011 (!) (nearly 10 years old). Up until late last evening, no message of an impending 2004 update, no download & install. If this had been my only system and didn’t follow such things, I would never have known that a major update to Windows had been released. At about 10 p.m. last night, I hit ‘check for updates,’ and like a bolt from the blue, I was offered to ‘download and install’ for 2004. Which I did. No SSD, so the entire process took about 3 hours – which honestly, on a 10 year old system, is not bad at all. As far as I can tell, the only issue was that my sound settings were adjusted from a default of playback from 24bits/192000Hz to 24bits/44100Hz. (I use Amazon Music’s HD service, and I want to bleed every last ounce of sound quality out of the service). There was no issue resetting that to my preferred default audio output. BTW, this system has the hybrid ‘Optima’ drivers, Intel base graphics with NVidia for games, etc. The drivers on my system are the latest from NVidia (and above the requirements for which the hold was placed), but still nearly 2 years old (which concerns me for future updates, but one step at a time …). I’ll also add, that I upgraded this system from Win7 to Win10 1909 (did a clean install) in early January … and performance under Win10 seems much better.

        Based on what I see are the upgrade holds, and the drivers each of these systems has, I really cannot understand why the 7353 is still ‘not ready,’ but my 10 year old system was rearing to go. Bottom line is, I don’t see any clear rhyme or reason as to which systems are offered 2004 and which are not based on my very limited personal experience.

        If I do experience any issues with the 2004 systems, I will update this post.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2273121 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        Old computer, with an ssd.  Not offered an update, but downloaded iso and updated to 2004 in about 30 minutes.  After install, internet connection said “no internet”, although it somewhat worked.  Searching online led to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\NlaSvc\Parameters\Internet
        set the dword EnableActiveProbing to 1

        I suspect my past use of O&O Shutup or something simlar may have caused this registry change, if I had the non-default?  This made internet work as normal, and I have seen no other problems.

      • #2273135 Reply
        bbearren
        AskWoody MVP

        I’m continuing to pound my daily driver desktop, video editing, audio editing, using Excel frequently, Outlook daily, and trying to replicate any applicable issues I see posted.  I use Samsung Magician to handle Trim on my SSD, my two HDD’s are primarily storage, and I use MyDefrag (which uses Windows’ degrag.exe with its own algorithms) as a task in Task Scheduler.

        I’ve still not had any hiccups, and 2004 is still noticeably quicker than 1909.  So far, nothing not to like, definitely no reason to revert to 1909.

        YMMV

        Create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates, in case you need to start over!
        "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns
        "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

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