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  • Can you believe?

    • This topic has 10 replies, 7 voices, and was last updated 1 month ago.
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    #2390981

    I am taking the plunge.

    Later today, somebody from AT&T is going to appear at the abode, and install AT&T Fiber(1 GB) service. Yes, for all my previous posts here on the AskWoody blog, I have been vanuevering a v.92 (52 kb) connection.

    I read other technical fora here on the W-WW. I also know what is being attempted by most third-party connections when I surf to a particular W-WW site. But what accerns me here & how is how will this gigabit fiber installion occur.

    From reading more technical fora {message me for the URLs, but they’re probably on my bookmark page}, I have an idea of which router I should request (Michael Horowitz will dispute.), likely the BGW320-505 – 2.2, and I will be configuring the installation on-line on the Windows 7- x64 system here. It will be an aerial drop (because AT&T would have cought flack if it did not enable gigabit connectivity from ‘poor’ neighborhoods). But beyond this, what should I expect?

    Needless(?!) to scribe, if something with the installation goes wrong, I will maintain a v.92 backup to report back to here (& elsewhere). But I think this will go OK.

    Wish me success.

    Important links you can use, without all the fluff or sales pitch = https://v.gd/sdr34
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    • #2390982

      I have Verizon fiber optic connection for everything: Internet, TV, telephone (landline). The fiber cable comes into the house, or apartment and ends in a special box placed during the installation and screwed to a wall in some out of the way place, in my case in a closet. From this box copper wires come out to a terminal near the TV, where one can connect it and also connect a router for the local home network. The telephone has another copper wire connection to the same box.

      One thing that is not entirely clear to me is where you mention that your connection is going to be of “one gigabit.” Am I correct in understanding that as “one gigabit per second”? That is quite fast: the top Verizon speeds are not that fast. I have, not the top Verizon speed, but a more modest 75 megabits per second download and 45 megabits per second upload, which is often enough if one does not have several devices connected at the same time, for example.

      Ex Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7) since mid-2020. Now: running macOS Big Sur 11.6 & sometimes, Linux (Mint)

      MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
      Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
      Waterfox "Current" and (now and then) Chrome. also Intego AV and Malwarebytes for the Mac.

      • #2390986

        My ISP told me I would get 1Gb/sec speed also, but the fine print says that speed is through the fiber lines only and that since the line going from the special box to the router is copper the actual speed would be significantly less than 1Gb/sec. Also any wifi connections would slow it down even more so that realistically my top speed through wireless would be about 300Mb/sec. And to be clear my lower case ‘b’ is short for ‘bit’, not ‘byte’.

        The “last mile” (from the special box to router) really slows things down and takes the shine off of fiber IMHO.

    • #2390985

      Roughly what should happen is this: An installer technician will attach some sort of interface box to the outside of your house (could also install it somewhere inside, but around here it’s typically outside), then drop a line to it. Then the tech will run another line into the house roughly to where you want the router; the line could go through a basement or crawl space or an attic and up/down a wall. He/she will connect the line to the router and make sure you’re connecting to AT&T. If the tech is in a good mood they might offer assistance in connecting your devices to the router and perhaps some basic router configuration.

      Then again if AT&T is like my ISP you will end up with no fiber at all! When a tech came out to install fiber to my place I was told there was no way that could happen even though my ISP invited me to upgrade to fiber at no expense as it required a 150 yard long line. The length was apparently a problem as was the fact that in my neighborhood the line had to run underground which meant a trench and there was no way that was going to happen either. So I still have regular old copper line. I did, however, get a brand new router for free that retails for between $200 and $250.

    • #2390995

      My ISP told me I would get 1Gb/sec speed also

      1Gb/s Fiber. Upload speed 100Mbs.

      • #2391001

        I’m just reporting what my ISP told me and what the fine print they provided said. Since I don’t have fiber I can neither confirm nor refute my ISP’s statements.

    • #2391023

      Fiber is fast, 2Gbps isn’t uncommon, costs a lot.  The dismal upload speeds of connections in general is my pet peeve, takes forever to upload something large.  Symmetrical connections are really expensive.

      As noted, a fiber connection may not come to your home, it may only go to a local node, then drop with wire. Installation, from your standpoint, is the same for any new service.  If you’re sufficiently technically inclined and it can be done with AT&T, just get a modem and buy your own wireless router. Your modem can stay put while the router, connected with an ethernet cable can be positioned wherever you need it for a good signal throughout your residence. Separate routers of much higher quality are easy to find.

      Not sure what speeds you’re paying for, you may need a router with 10Gbps ports and Cat 6 or higher cables to see full speed.  Currently, even wireless AX has problems maintaining speeds above 1Gbps.  See here, pick one for the charts:

      https://www.smallnetbuilder.com/tools/charts/wifi-router/bar/248-6-ghz-profile-dn/44?see=AVG

      What you should expect?  Compared to your current 1990’s speed, almost instant everything.  You will like!

    • #2391080

      the top Verizon speeds are not that fast.

      Why not? mine are but only via local verizon net, for DSL reports for areas across the country 250 mb/s seems to be the top.

      Capture-3

      🍻

      Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
      • #2391099

        Alex: Interesting. I wrote my comment based on recent numbers about Verizon Fios, and yours agree with those I saw and are what I meant by “not as fast”, because Steve kicked off this thread by, among other things, writing that he’s got “one gigabit.” (I am guessing that he meant “one gigabit per second.” (*))

        (*) To be more pretentious: 1 Gb/s = 1 Bd, where Bd stands for “baud” (low case), a unit of transmission of information (symbols) rate.

        Ex Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7) since mid-2020. Now: running macOS Big Sur 11.6 & sometimes, Linux (Mint)

        MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
        Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
        Waterfox "Current" and (now and then) Chrome. also Intego AV and Malwarebytes for the Mac.

        • #2391155

          Oops! 1 Gb/s = 1000,000,000 Bd !!! But those are all zeroes, anyway.

          Ex Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7) since mid-2020. Now: running macOS Big Sur 11.6 & sometimes, Linux (Mint)

          MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
          Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
          Waterfox "Current" and (now and then) Chrome. also Intego AV and Malwarebytes for the Mac.

    • #2391095

      Mine’s almost that fast. How’s 1 gigabit per 25 seconds down, 1 gigabit per 500 seconds up?

      May not be quite as fast, but at least I get to pay as much!

      Dell XPS 13/9310, i5-1135G7/16GB, KDE Neon
      Dell G3 15/3579, i7-8750H/16GB, KDE Neon
      Asus P8P67 Deluxe, i5-2500k/16GB, KDE Neon

      1 user thanked author for this post.
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