News, tips, advice, support for Windows, Office, PCs & more. Tech help. No bull. We're community supported by donations from our Plus Members, and proud of it
Home icon Home icon Home icon Email icon RSS icon
  • Checking and repairing the SSD/HD of a Mac.

    Posted on OscarCP Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Home Forums AskWoody support Other platforms – for Windows wonks Checking and repairing the SSD/HD of a Mac.

    This topic contains 6 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Nathan Parker 3 weeks, 6 days ago.

    • Author
      Posts
    • #1874737 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      I have Webroot SecureAnyWhere AV, that includes some disk maintenance software, installed in both in my Mac and in my PC.

      In the Mac (a MacBook Pro ca. mid-2015 that I bought two years ago) I did once, about a year ago, a scan using the Webroot software and it returned the following report: “Unresolved issues exist.” There is also an option to “Repair the disk”, but I am reluctant to use something to modify the SSD contents that is not from Apple, or is not recommended by people well-familiar with my type of laptop and with Macs in general. This machine is running Mojave 10.14.5, has an SSD with a 1 TB capacity and some 85% of it still unused.

      I would be thankful for any practical advice that is offered on what to use to do disk checks and repairs on my type of Mac and perhaps on other types as well. I suppose that might be of interest also to other Loungers that have started recently to use Macs or are considering to use them in the not too distant future.

       

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1874842 Reply

      Fred
      AskWoody Lounger

      :“Unresolved issues exist.” There is also an option to “Repair the disk”,

      Do you have any thought what these two things might mean?

      • #1874845 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        My understanding is that the Webroot software, when one checks the disk with it, produces this very terse report to the effect that either everything is OK or not. Something like running Windows’ CHKDSK, but with no details given as to what the problems may be. If one would like to fix those problems in the disk, whatever they are, then one could run the “Repair Disk” feature. The “problems” are not malware infections, but things like corrupt files.

        I am not satisfied with this and would like to use something a bit more communicative and preferably backed by recommendations from others here.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1874848 Reply

      Alex5723
      AskWoody Plus

      I would be thankful for any practical advice that is offered on what to use to do disk checks and repairs on my type of Mac

      MacOS has 2 build-in utilities :
      Disk Utility to check S.M.A.R.T status
      First Aid to check for errors.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #1874857 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Ales5723: Thanks for the advice. I took it and looked into those two procedures you mentioned by doing a Web search and that way got the instructions for using the Disk application and also how to check on the S.M.A.R.T. status. The result I got: the SSD is just fine. What might have been those “Unsolved issues” I got from the Webroot software? I still have no idea, except that it is not a problem detected by doing the checks with those two macOS built-in procedures. So I think I’ll just give this whole thing a rest.

    • #1875543 Reply

      Fred
      AskWoody Lounger

      Thank you both for reminding and putting me to repair

      • This reply was modified 1 month ago by  Fred.
    • #1881139 Reply

      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      I also have Webroot and have the same message on my Mac. Bottom line: you can ignore it. Webroot is throwing the message due to the way previous versions of macOS offered the ability to manually check/repair disk permissions. In the past, manually checking/repairing disk permissions was a common Mac troubleshooting step.

      A while back (I can’t remember the specific OS, might have been Yosemite or El Capitan), macOS removed the ability to manually check/repair disk permissions (macOS does it automatically now when it detects an issue). Occasionally, some apps that are tied to the old feature such as Webroot will still throw the error message. Clicking repair disk in this case generally causes the Mac to freeze requiring a hard reboot since it’s attempting to run a deprecated feature.

      The place where you want to handle disk management is the built-in Disk Utility. If you have an issue that occurs, open it up and click First Aid. That should resolve what you need (in some cases you’ll need to run First Aid from the Recovery Partition, but generally not).

      If that still doesn’t resolve an issue that occurs, I can always suggest third-party utilities if you ever need them.

      Ideally, Webroot needs to remove that from a Webroot update since it no longer resolves anything. The only Mac I’ve had to run repair permissions on lately was my old PowerBook G4 running Leopard since it was sitting in a closet for too long.

      Nathan Parker

      1 user thanked author for this post.

    Please follow the -Lounge Rules- no personal attacks, no swearing, and politics/religion are relegated to the Rants forum.

    Reply To: Checking and repairing the SSD/HD of a Mac.

    You can use BBCodes to format your content.
    Your account can't use Advanced BBCodes, they will be stripped before saving.