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  • Chredge coming to Linux

    Posted on Ascaris Comment on the AskWoody Lounge
    Viewing 8 reply threads
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      • #2299202 Reply
        Ascaris
        AskWoody_MVP

        I’m not particularly interested in Chredge, given that I changed my whole OS to get away from things Microsoftian, but it’s certainly an interesting turn of events that has been foreshadowed for some time, but now we have a date. Next month (October), MS will be bringing the Chredge beta to Linux.

        Linus Torvalds, once commented that if MS were ever to release applications for Linux, he’d won. This victory came a while ago, of course, with several applications from MS now having Linux versions, but this one is particularly big when you consider that Edge is the heir to IE, the browser that MS once used to try to dominate the web, the symbol of the old, predatory, Windows-centric Microsoft.

        I’m just waiting for Office for Linux. That’s the one of the three most-mentioned things that keeps a lot of people pinned to Windows (the others being Photoshop and gaming). If MS is truly no longer the company that it once was, this would be a great way to demonstrate the change. I am not holding my breath, but if it happened, I would not be as shocked now as I would have been a few years ago.

        Group "L" (KDE Neon Linux, User Edition).

      • #2299269 Reply
        Microfix
        AskWoody MVP

        as per title: Chredge coming to Linux
        To ANY of my loaded distro’s it ain’t.
        Don’t use, nor need anything MS in our GNU linux distro’s, not even fonts.

        Win8.1 Pro | Linux Hybrids | Win7 Pro O/L | WinXP O/L
      • #2299274 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        ? says:

        no thank you, please…

      • #2299281 Reply
        Charlie
        AskWoody Plus

        I’m assuming that Chredge needs to be updated, as was IE.  I wonder how that will work, thru Linux or MS?  If it’s MS, it would not be worth the risk.

        My memory is still good...but access time is way down.

        • #2299313 Reply
          Ascaris
          AskWoody_MVP

          ’m assuming that Chredge needs to be updated, as was IE. I wonder how that will work, thru Linux or MS? If it’s MS, it would not be worth the risk.

          All browsers need to be updated periodically, both to support new web features and to address security risks that have been found.

          I would expect that the Linux Chredge would be offered as a series of native packages (.deb for Debian and derivatives, like Ubuntu and Mint) for the various distros, or perhaps as a cross-distro Snap or Flatpak (or both). The repo itself would be owned and operated by Microsoft, but the programs to let you know that an update is available and that install it, if you should so choose, are part of the Linux installation.

          I don’t know if that counts as being though Linux or Microsoft, though. It’s a little of both.

          One of the concerns that Mint dev Clem had with Ubuntu’s plan to drop the .deb version of Chromium and replace it with the Snap version was that the Snap version updates by itself, while the .deb version behaves like every other package, where it is offered to you and you can choose to let it be updated or not.

          I don’t know if the auto updating is inherent within Snap or if that’s just the default setting for it in Ubuntu, but if there’s no opportunity for the user to change that, I’d have a problem with that. I didn’t come to Linux to have less control over updates… if I wanted that, I could have stuck with Windows.

          Whatever it is, I’ll be curious to take a look and find out all of this stuff, and even to take a look at Chredge itself and see if it alleviates the terribly stutter-y scrolling I have always had from Chromium and derivatives, but, well, it’s Microsoft, and my Linux PCs are de-Microsofted for a reason (it’s really only one reason, though you might think there were ’10’ of them).

          I also think the odds that I’d like what I saw in Chredge for Linux would be about the same as me winning the lottery (and I don’t play the lottery, aka “tax on people with poor math skills”). It has to have an option for the traditional menu bar just to start, and I doubt that it will even have that. I’ll test it, see how it performs compared to the others, but my bet is that will be as far as it goes.

          Group "L" (KDE Neon Linux, User Edition).

      • #2299283 Reply
        mn–
        AskWoody Lounger

        I’m just waiting for Office for Linux. That’s the one of the three most-mentioned things that keeps a lot of people pinned to Windows

        Not even actually Office any more, it’s all the integrations with enterprise whatever…

        I’d say the major thing remaining is built-in centralized management, including end user applications. As in group policy. There’s no single equivalent that’d “just work” on Linux, even if a bunch of distro-specific initiatives in that direction do exist.

        • #2299316 Reply
          Ascaris
          AskWoody_MVP

          I was thinking more of consumer space, where a lot of individuals still use Office and Photoshop for personal use or in small business environments. I don’t know much about the corporate IT world, other than that your “partners” will sometimes send BSA thugs to your place of business to look for reasons to rough you up a little, and with the byzantine licensing agreements, they can probably find something to use to that end. It doesn’t even need to be valid, as long as the victim… err, partner believes that it is (or that it is not worth fighting). If you like having protection payoffs being part of your business expenses, who am I to argue on your behalf?

          If the vendor lock-in is so strong that even offering Office for Linux wouldn’t be enough to entice enterprise customers to go Microsoftless, then why not just do it, Microsoft, and reap all of the goodwill and really drive home the point that this is not the old Microsoft anymore?

          Group "L" (KDE Neon Linux, User Edition).

          • #2299318 Reply
            mn–
            AskWoody Lounger

            I don’t know much about the corporate IT world, other than that your “partners” will sometimes send BSA thugs to your place of business to look for reasons to rough you up a little, and with the byzantine licensing agreements, they can probably find something to use to that end.

            … and THAT is one of the major attractions of Linux for the enterprise folks. A lot less of the license administration work and lawyer bills.

            Application licensing is of course still there on Linux too, especially with Oracle and other such…

            (One could also make all kinds of interesting statements about selective enforcement with Microsoft’s license terms, particularly for Office. Might technically count as unfair business practices in some jurisdictions even, but as long as it’s in favor of home and small business users I don’t see anyone bothering to do much about it.)

            If the vendor lock-in is so strong that even offering Office for Linux wouldn’t be enough to entice enterprise customers to go Microsoftless, then why not just do it, Microsoft, and reap all of the goodwill and really drive home the point that this is not the old Microsoft anymore?

            Well yes, I suppose Microsoft could do that and do a lightweight Group Policy Server to handle the Office application settings centrally.

            I expect they’re probably making too much of a profit with volume licenses of Windows 10 Enterprise (including LTSC) to do that just yet, but the moment someone like Red Hat comes up with a good-enough Group Policy equivalent and manages to sell that solution to a major corporation or government…

      • #2299312 Reply
        DrBonzo
        AskWoody Plus

        The only good thing about Chredge coming to Linux is that it might help to make the latter more mainstream and popular. That would be a good thing from my non-techie viewpoint.

        But, I’ll never use it as I’m trying to put as much distance between me and what was, for me at least, the MS patching madhouse.

        I suspect it will be updated in a manner similar to how Opera gets updated. When you install Opera in either Ubuntu or Mint, a link to the Opera update site is added to the list of allowed software repositories, so that when the Update Manager (or its equivalent) checks for updates it checks for Opera updates along with Linux updates. It’s all quite seamless with Opera, but the update is actually coming from Opera, so it’s their responsibility – and not, apparently, Ubuntu’s or Mint’s – to make sure the update works correctly. And there’s the rub for me with MS and Chredge: they’ll be responsible for ensuring the patches work, and they just don’t have a good track record with IE and Win 7. I haven’t paid much attention to IE and any other version of Windows.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2299353 Reply
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        I would be interested in Office for Linux, if ever becomes available and is not worse than Office for Windows is now, particularly as far as patches go. As to Edge? I have enough browsers already in my PC and Mac and with them I can do everything I want to do without serious difficulties. I am intrigued by the idea that someone would like to use Edge in Linux (or in macOS: there is also a version for that), except as part of some scientific experiment.

        Isn’t MS bringing Edge to the party after most people have left?

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

        • #2299375 Reply
          Ascaris
          AskWoody_MVP

          There are some areas of Linux browsing that I would not mind to see some improvement. Linux browsers have long lacked hardware video decoding acceleration (aside from a few offerings from the major desktop environment makers, Gnome and KDE, which don’t work for me for lack of features and addons), and that’s only just been addressed by Firefox 80+. Chrome could have had it any time they wished, as the code to do it is already in Chromium, but they’ve declined to unlock the feature. For OpenSUSE and Fedora users, the patch to enable hardware decoding is already in the version in the repo, though still turned off by default (one of them tried to enable it by default, but the bugs that Google cites as the reason they have it locked in the OFF position made an appearance, so they both now have the patch to turn it on enabled, but not the flag.

          I’ve tested both on my Acer Swift (whose Atom-derived CPU is slow enough to really show any deficiencies in decoding), and Chromium’s used to work really well as far as decreasing frame drops, but the power savings of the Windows version or of the dedicated media players in Linux was not there. Then Google changed something with Chromium, and now hardware decoding works worse than it used to.

          Firefox’s hardware decoding is much the same as the old Chromium decoding. It works well to reduce frame drop, but the power savings of the Windows version of the same browser isn’t there. In this case, though, the feature is brand new, so it may well be optimized in the coming months.

          This is the kind of thing that Microsoft would be capable of bringing to the table. A Chredge that has hardware decoding acceleration on par with what is available in Windows browsers would really be something of value for Linux. Again, this is from a consumer perspective, though solid, power-efficient decoding would be useful for enterprise customers too, for any that have people out in the field with laptops.

          I doubt that’s what the intent is, though. I’d guess that the whole point is to have Chredge as a front-end for their cloud services, the business MS is really interested in now. MS does not have much consumer focus these days.

           

          Group "L" (KDE Neon Linux, User Edition).

      • #2299405 Reply
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Besides MS developing an Edge version for Linux, are there any independent Linux projects for developing open-source browsers, perhaps some “freeware” ones, based on Chromium? If so, how are these doing?

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

        • #2299408 Reply
          mn–
          AskWoody Lounger

          Vivaldi is Chromium-based, yes… and has been my browser of choice for in-browser media on Linux for a while now.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2299409 Reply
          DrBonzo
          AskWoody Plus

          Opera is chromium based, free, and works well on Mint. In fact, IMHO, it works better on Mint and macOS High Sierra/Mojave/Catalina than it does on Win 7/8.1

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2301032 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        I do not Consider crEdge for Linux any sort of wining at all, in fact, I consider crEdge for Linux a Slippery Slope to more nefarious issues with privacy and security as well. And What’s lacking to me for Linux is any thoughts coming from Linux Community that’s related to there being any Potential for Windows 10, and that included WSL subsystem for Linux, and any ability to get into and snoop around in any separately installed dual boot Linux Distro’s Partition, and that done surreptitiously while booted into Windows 10.

        I’ve got to have some assurances that any 10/Linux Distro dual boot partitions are not mountable and searchable in the background while Booted into Windows 10 with that WSL capability and I’m still researching that in trying to decide if I’ll even keep Windows 10 installed at all in a Dual Boot configuration with Mint 20/20.1. I do not want that snooping around under 10 and really am insecure with having 10/WSL capable  and any access to a separate Linux partition and so much happening when booted into 10 that’s happening under the RADAR and undetected.

         

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