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  • Chrome ushered more than 11,000 tracker cookies — in a single week

    Posted on Alex5723 Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Home Forums AskWoody support Questions: Browsers and desktop software Chrome ushered more than 11,000 tracker cookies — in a single week

    This topic contains 11 replies, has 10 voices, and was last updated by  Geo 3 months, 2 weeks ago.

    • Author
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    • #1858746 Reply

      Alex5723
      AskWoody Plus

      Our latest privacy experiment found Chrome ushered more than 11,000 tracker cookies into our browser — in a single week.

      In a week of Web surfing on my desktop, I discovered 11,189 requests for tracker “cookies” that Chrome would have ushered right onto my computer but were automatically blocked by Firefox.

      https://www.washingtonpost.com/technology/2019/06/21/google-chrome-has-become-surveillance-software-its-time-switch/?utm_term=.2a23e57b2232

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1858868 Reply

      Microfix
      Da Boss

      Your link has a few trackers. (thanks to my choice of browser plugin a couple were blocked)
      There are alternatives with or without tracking blockers as standard and a good few to choose from if you prefer blink or gecko based browsers.

      Private and Secure Browsers to Keep Your Data Safe

      ********** Win7 x64/x86 | Win8.1 x64 | Linux Hybrids x64 **********

    • #1858865 Reply

      anonymous

      Won’t install chrome on any of my machines… and I do web development. I run it in a vm for testing only.

    • #1858892 Reply

      zero2dash
      AskWoody Lounger

      I can’t even get access to the page while Privacy Badger is enabled.
      If that’s not the pot calling the kettle black, I don’t know what is. 😀

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #1860131 Reply

        Ascaris
        AskWoody_MVP

        Sign o’ the times.

        The Reg has also been taken to task in the comments section for bundling its pro-user, pro-privacy, anti-tracking, anti-Google/Facebook content with trackers.

        The people who write the articles, I think, aren’t the ones doing the website administration or trying to figure out how to keep the writers paid.  It’s a massively dysfunctional system where even the most ardent anti-tracking sites (in terms of their editorial opinion) are faced with having to accept tracking if they want to continue to get their anti-tracking message out, unless they can figure out some alternate method (paywalls and the like).

        The state of advertising on the web is such that there is essentially no such thing as advertising without tracking, nor is there any feasible way for a site owner to have much control over what ads are shown.  The ad brokers like Google have all of the power, and it’s largely a take-it-or-leave-it deal.

        Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.17.0).

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1859471 Reply

      Alex5723
      AskWoody Plus

      Your link has a few trackers

      🙂

       

      wpost

      Attachments:
      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #1861078 Reply

        satrow
        AskWoody MVP

        Someone forgot to check the cookie count.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1861080 Reply

      satrow
      AskWoody MVP

      Paywall-free version, maybe less privacy invasive too.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #1863947 Reply

      Bill C.
      AskWoody Plus

      The one add-on I really like in Firefox is the Facebook Container. Combine it with an adBlocker and HTTPS Everywhere, I have found my tracker hit numbers have dropped off greatly.

    • #1864116 Reply

      sigrossman
      AskWoody Lounger

      Here’s an answer to the problem that allows you to stay with Chrome’s superior speed, Hitman Pro.  Set it up to run daily.   It is specifically designed to remove tracker cookies and will catch some serious malware but it isn’t full-fledged anti-malware software. .  The paid version is $25 for a  year, cheap in the software universe.  I do the tons of search work a day and had been getting usually, get 200 files removed.

      The only downside is it closes Chrome after cleaning but it should not be a problem if you’ve set Chrome to open to “continue where you left off”.

      That number has come way down after I installed the Chrome Ad Remover extension.  It’s free.  According to my settings, it has removed over 475,000 ads and 275,000 tracker files over the last 5 months.  The downside is that some sites won’t load if this is running.  You can disable it for a specific site or timeframe.

       

      • This reply was modified 3 months, 2 weeks ago by  sigrossman.
      • This reply was modified 3 months, 2 weeks ago by  sigrossman.
    • #1864231 Reply

      Noel Carboni
      AskWoody_MVP

      Another vote from me for uBlock and uMatrix add-ons for disallowing your browser to visit many, many bad servers, including those that seek to track and infect.

      UBlock, which stops your browser from trying to visit sites per freely-available auto-downloaded blacklists, really is “set it and forget it” easy. UMatrix is more geeky, but once you get used to it you realize the policy of NOT running scripts from any site but the one you’ve contacted is a very good one. And you can easily make an occasional site-specific exception if it is needed.

      The add-ons aren’t the only thing I do to increase online security, but do represent an important part. I also block DNS resolutions of known bad sites, and run a deny-by-default firewall (though to be fair my browser is set to allow-by-default with exceptions, leaning on the two mentioned add-ons and the DNS blocking heavily for protection).

      All in all, any strategy that assumes malware or other unwanted data WILL get on to your system then has to be cleaned off seems wrong to me. Yes, that’s how most antivirus/antimalware strategies are oriented. Blocking unwanted/bad things from getting onto your system in the first place instead (or in addition) is extremely effective.

      UBlock and uMatrix are available cross-platform, though not for the iPad. However I just learned of a “Brave Browser” for iPad that seeks to avoid the unwanted things and places of the internet in a similar vein.

      -Noel

    • #1864293 Reply

      Geo
      AskWoody Plus

      Another vote from me for uBlock and uMatrix add-ons for disallowing your browser to visit many, many bad servers, including those that seek to track and infect.

        I use Adblocker Ultimate. could you do a review of this one  before I switch to Ublock.

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