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  • Clearing up Windows 10’s detritus

    Posted on Cee Arr Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Home Forums AskWoody support Windows Windows 10 Windows 10 version 1909 – November 2019 Update Clearing up Windows 10’s detritus

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      • #2296642 Reply
        Cee Arr
        AskWoody Plus

        Is it safe/advisable to delete the mountains of “stuff” in, 1) temp,  2) %temp%, 3) prefetch?  There is a considerable anount contained therein.  What is the purpose? What is the safest way to remove same, if at all?  Thanks in advance.

      • #2296651 Reply
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        It is safe to remove ‘Temp’ data, cashed data, browser’s data, cookies..
        You can use the free portable ccPortable… or use the build-in disk cleanup…

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2296653 Reply
        Paul T
        AskWoody MVP

        To clean up after Windows use the built-in cleaner. Windows temp files return as soon as you fire up Windows so there is no point going mad trying to keep them at bay.
        If you are running low on disk space, the usual suggestion is to get a bigger disk – upgrade to an SSD for major speed improvement.

        To clean up the Windows way.
        Open Windows Explorer.
        Right click on drive C:
        Select Properties.
        Click on the Disk Cleanup button.
        Select the items you want.

        cheers, Paul

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2296662 Reply
        Microfix
        Guest

        In addition to PaulT’s post, I recommend using the ‘clean up system files’ button to release old patch installation files and various other temp files. These can amount to gigabytes in unecessary space if left unattended. There’s a good diagramatic tutorial available over on Ten Forums to help you with this.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2296713 Reply
        joep517
        AskWoody MVP

        Deleting temporary files may not free up as much space as think it would. Beginning with Windows 10 1903 a certain amount of storage is reserved by Windows. See Windows 10 and reserved storage for a more detailed explanation.

        --Joe

        • #2296767 Reply
          bbearren
          AskWoody MVP

          Deleting temporary files may not free up as much space as think it would. Beginning with Windows 10 1903 a certain amount of storage is reserved by Windows.

          As best as I can determine, this reserved storage only gets reserved if one performs a clean install.  I don’t do clean installations, and I don’t have this reserved storage on any of my installations.

          I also have Storage sense turned off, and the Storage Service disabled.  I’ve had my drives partitioned and my storage allocated for many years, now, and I don’t want or need Windows help.

          I have a scheduled extended Disk Cleanup task that runs daily to clear away the detritus, so it’s pretty much a once-and-done for me.

          Create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates, in case you need to start over!
          "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns
          "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

          • #2296771 Reply
            joep517
            AskWoody MVP

            You are correct about clean installs only not updates. It is also on by default on new PCs with version 1903 and later. Note that it is not clear from what I can find whether a Windows 10 reset is considered a clean install or not.

            --Joe

            • This reply was modified 1 week, 2 days ago by joep517.
      • #2296880 Reply
        PaulK
        AskWoody Lounger

        Concerning PreFetch: Deleting the folder or its contents is pointless, as it is dynamically rebuilt. Do a Search on [ prefetch folder ]; one hit is
        https://windowsground.com/what-is-windows-prefetch-in-windows-10/ .

      • #2296903 Reply
        bratkinson
        AskWoody Plus

        If Windows 10 is on an SSD, Prefetch is effectively adding needless I/Os to your SSD.  On a hard drive, having a ‘small’ mini-directory with copies of frequently used Windows internals will improve performance.  SSD I/O speed largely negates the need for a pre-fetch folder of files.  Maybe there’s a smidge of performance improvement with Prefetch, but I have my doubts.  Considering the extra CPU cycles needed to first search the mini-directory to find a module that may be there and maintaining that mini-directory vs searching the full Windows/System32 directory at SSD speed, I decided to turn it off completely.

        I had to track it down, but disabling:  ‘Sysmain         Maintains and improves system performance over time’ in services (Win 10 v1909) put an end to it.  Did I notice any slowdown since disabling it?  None whatsoever.

        But then, I’m running an overclocked 8 processor system that I keep tweaking endlessly to stop running useless Windows 10 garbage from bloatware to things like Bluetooth that do not exist in my computer.  As of last count, I had 70 services disabled.  Makes for a lightning fast boot up as well rocket speed everything else.

        In addition to Windows/Temp, I regularly clean out Users/<userid>/appdata/local/temp, Users/<userid>/appdata/Roaming/Microsoft/Windows/Recent Items, and the cache files from Firefox: Users/<userid>/appdata/Local/Mozilla/Firefox/Profiles/xxxxxxxxx-default-release/cache2/entries, to name a few.  To me, fewer items in the SSD directory speeds things up, a couple nanoseconds at a time.  And yes, I wrote my first assembler code in 1967.  I’m still a computer efficiency freak.

        • This reply was modified 1 week, 1 day ago by bratkinson.
        • This reply was modified 1 week, 1 day ago by bratkinson.
        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2296925 Reply
        Paul T
        AskWoody MVP

        If Windows 10 is on an SSD, Prefetch is effectively adding needless I/Os to your SSD

        I think you’ll find Windows automatically disables this on SSDs. Manually disabling it means it’s unavailable for any spinners you have installed.

        cheers, Paul

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2297185 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        What is the safest way to remove same, if at all?

        Set Storage Sense to remove temporary files automatically every day, week or month:

        How to use Windows 10’s Storage Sense to free up Disk Space

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