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  • combo modem router better?

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      • #2363564
        krism
        AskWoody Plus

        Susan posted about trusting routers so I checked and yes I am on the latest firmware, but I discovered that now it seems that everything is combo modem and router. Is this somehow safer?

        I have comcast 200Mbps coax into Arris SB6141 modem, RJ45, to Arris SBR-AC1750 router which is rated at 1750Mbps. Is this good or am I behind the times? It seems there is a lot of stuff out there that folks are dumping that won’t handle the speed.

        Thanks!

        System specs in sig.

        Group W (windows, current)
        - ThinkPad T570-20HA, i7-7600U, 2.8GHz, UEFI/GPT, Win10 21H1 Pro x64, 16GB, Sammy 256GB M.2 NVMe PM961. -

        • This topic was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by krism. Reason: specs in sig
      • #2363580
        Paul T
        AskWoody MVP

        it seems that everything is combo modem and router. Is this somehow safer?

        It is cheaper!
        I’m assuming the 1750Mbps is the wifi speed. That is more than enough for a home / small business network – cabled ethernet is only 1000Mbps.

        The router is the thing you want to be up to date as that is the bit that keeps the internet out of your network.

        What you could consider is a different network your IoT stuff and one for guests. This usually requires a second router as the ones provided by ISPs rarely have those capabilities.

        cheers, Paul

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2363649
          krism
          AskWoody Plus

          Thanks.
          No, the 1750 is a beast. They claim 1750 download speed. I got it on ebay for I think $50 or $60 (it was a “19 Carl Edwards” logo on side edition) when I was trying to get away from 100Mbps routers a year or 2 ago. It’s been a champ for me.

          Compatibility Compatible with any modem Cable/DSL/Fiber
          Download Speed (Internet) 1750 Mbps
          Gigabit Ethernet Port 5 10/100 Base-T Ethernet
          Wi-Fi 802.11b/g/n/ac
          WPS (Wi-Fi Pairing Button) Yes
          Preset Wi-Fi Security Yes
          Wireless Guest Access Yes
          HD Multi-Media Streaming Yes
          High-Performance Online Gaming Yes
          Energy-Efficient Ethernet Yes

          Yes, I do try to keep it up to date, firmware-wise.

          I’ll stick with this.

          Group W (windows, current)
          - ThinkPad T570-20HA, i7-7600U, 2.8GHz, UEFI/GPT, Win10 21H1 Pro x64, 16GB, Sammy 256GB M.2 NVMe PM961. -

      • #2363624
        MrJimPhelps
        AskWoody MVP

        In my opinion, ISPs are providing combo router/modem units to their customers so that they can have some control over the router. (You will know that this is the case if there are areas that you can’t get to when you log into the router.) One of the things they want to do with the router is provide a wireless hotspot for their customers. So they use your combo unit to do that.

        I used to have a combo unit that I rented from my ISP; I then found I could purchase a modem from them for $25, and use my own router, so I did that. I can now access every area when I log into my router.

        As for the speed aspect, I can’t comment on that, because I don’t have super fast internet speed; I have basic DSL.

        Group "L" (Linux Mint)
        with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2363651
          krism
          AskWoody Plus

          Yep, good point. Thanks. I’ll stick with what I have.

          Group W (windows, current)
          - ThinkPad T570-20HA, i7-7600U, 2.8GHz, UEFI/GPT, Win10 21H1 Pro x64, 16GB, Sammy 256GB M.2 NVMe PM961. -

      • #2363640
        MrJimPhelps
        AskWoody MVP

        There is another advantage with having a separate router and modem, that you don’t have when you have a combo unit: If you have VOIP phone service (e.g. Vonage), and you have a separate router and modem, you can put your VOIP adapter between the modem and the router, thereby giving the VOIP adapter first dibs on bandwidth. VOIP doesn’t need much bandwidth very often; but when it does (i.e. when you use the phone), it needs the bandwidth to be available. Giving the VOIP adapter first dibs on bandwidth will make it more likely that the VOIP adapter will always work well. Also, if your computer loses its internet connection, you can pick up the phone to see if you have a dial tone. If you do, then you know that the problem is in your router, not in your modem and not in the service coming in to your house over the wire. You lose the bandwidth advantage with a combo unit, because with a combo unit, your VOIP adapter is just one of many IoT devices that share the same bandwidth.

        Group "L" (Linux Mint)
        with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2363653
          krism
          AskWoody Plus

          Thanks, That’s a good point. I don’t have VOIP, but who knows what the future might bring! I’ll stick with this.

          Group W (windows, current)
          - ThinkPad T570-20HA, i7-7600U, 2.8GHz, UEFI/GPT, Win10 21H1 Pro x64, 16GB, Sammy 256GB M.2 NVMe PM961. -

          • #2363784
            Ascaris
            AskWoody MVP

            I have kind of poky VDSL also (40 Mb down/2 up), and the modem is also a router as in your case. I ended up putting the modem into transparent bridged mode, turning the router portion off, acting only as a modem, while my personal router handles the things like PPPoE login and the LAN duties. The ISP version lacks a lot of features, and it kind of rubs me the wrong way letting them have an extra level of control over my home LAN.

            Needless to say, this is an endorsement for your current setup over a single unit setup!

            My ISP is actually pretty good with modems. They have always given them to me, free of charge, along with the service. I’m on the third model so far, since the other two became obsolete, so they just gave me a new one. Well, a refurbished one, the first and second time; the one I am using now was marked as new.

             

            Group "L" (KDE Neon Linux 5.22.0 User Edition)

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