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  • COVID-19: On being prepared for what is coming and getting ready for it.

    Posted on OscarCP Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Home Forums Outside the box Rumors and what-ifs COVID-19: On being prepared for what is coming and getting ready for it.

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      • #2208440 Reply
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        This is a comment I made elsewhere first, answering one here: #2208407  , but got deleted because, really, was not quite on topic. I expected that, although I also suggested in it, if not suitable for that forum, that it might be moved elsewhere. Now that it has been deleted there, but not moved, I am starting this new thread with it. The question for me on doing this has been “in which forum?” I do no believe this is a topic where politicized, ideological, or religious opinions really would be appropriate to its discussion, so “Rumors and What Ifs” might be a more appropriate place for it. Now, here is the transplanted comment, with some appropriate editing:

        DriftyDonN ( #2208407 ): “We cannot foresee let alone prepare for all possible outcomes. Be informed and don’t prepare for an iceberg in Miami.

        Yes, indeed you don’t. And yes, indeed you should try to be informed about what is likely. The truth, as I understand the current situation (and maybe life in general) is that, yes, we are in a bad situation of (still) unknown extent and seriousness. But, since we cannot hide very well and we cannot run from viruses that cannot be seen unless one carries around an electron microscope (and these are large beasts that require a room full of equipment to work) then we hide a bit and do not run. Just carry on, stiff upper lips, etc. That, I think, is life. As I understand it.

        Governments in most countries, with a few exceptions I know of (Korea? Taiwan? Singapore? Any others someone knows of?) have been slow to recognize the problem that was brewing and known to be a matter requiring attention and decisive action to prepare for it. Action that was going to be bad for various kinds of important businesses and annoy voters no end. Closing big sport events? Not allowing spring break beer swigging parties on beaches where students flock to by the hundreds and pour money in the local economies, making shopkeepers and many others who benefit, directly or indirectly, happy, or unhappy if said flocking is not allowed to proceed? And where were all those sick people, anyway? It is as if a war were coming and those governments were preoccupied with making sure that more main airports are ready for the super-extra-big jets that are definitely going to come flying to them, any time now. Or with making sure G5 is deployed as soon as possible.

        End of the transplanted comment. So here, now, is a question you might care to discuss:

        How quick has been the response to the pandemic in your neck of the woods? And, please, remember no political slogans or partisan accusations or loaded references to John’s Apocalypse. “Just the facts, Ma’am.” That would be nice. Thanks

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

      • #2208475 Reply
        b
        AskWoody Plus

        SLOW:

        USA wasted weeks by not using WHO test kits sent to many other countries:

        How The CDC Botched Its Initial Coronavirus Response With Faulty Tests

        NOW test kits are finally being imported:

        Air Force imports 500,000 coronavirus test kits from Italy as Trump CDC struggles to make enough

        Windows 10 Pro Version 2004: Group ASAP (chump/pioneer)

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2208476 Reply
        DriftyDonN
        AskWoody Plus

        Well, county officials have NOT done much to thin the herd at the beaches. Spring Break continues. Really bad for our economy but where isn’t it?

        A local major food chain mention in the daily news briefs- Publix- is NOT keeping up with the demand. Instantcart delivery => Bless the workers, replace mangmnt. The home office and warehouse is located about 60 miles away and the stores are only open 12 hrs now. Plenty of time to keep inventory up to snuff. But I am not an inventory control person and I suppose they cannot enforce hoarding prevention.

        So, the health dept  allowing masses of people and Major food chain not up to provisioning.

        Aside from that, they’re doing ….I dont know what they are doing.

        D

        • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 1 day ago by DriftyDonN. Reason: spelling/word choice
        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2208497 Reply
        cyberSAR
        AskWoody Plus

        Well I’ve been reluctant to post much on this, but coming from a LEO/EMS background in my past life I can say, at least where I’m located, local govt is managed by morons. I remember when I first started at my local sheriff’s office, during a threat of hurricane they pulled all assets into the local barn. My question was, what if a tornado hits this location? We lose EVERYTHING. They then spread equipment out into various locations to minimize the risk.

        My wife and kids still work in the LEO and fire services here and it’s no different now. They are JUST NOW starting to think/panic about what they should do or should have done sooner. They can’t get supplies now, they are just starting to think about what happens if the virus makes it around the 911 dispatch center (not doing any testing and still don’t have a plan) because they don’t know what they would do if it did.

        One of our mayors put out an email 2 weeks ago stating if you’re sick do not come to work. 3 days ago a police officer showed up with fever and flu symptoms. He worked for 4 hours before his Lt. noticed and sent him home. How many did he possibly infect in his 4 hours? I say he should have been fired on the spot!

        Sorry if I come of sounding like I know it all, because I certainly don’t, but this has been chapping me for a couple weeks and I guess I just felt the need to vent. All I can say is, educate yourself, evaluate your risk, act accordingly. Don’t rely on govt officials to keep you safe!

        5 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2209324 Reply
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Governors of several US states are asking President Trump to approve the use of the military in coordination with the National Guard (a military body normally controlled by the state governors to use, within the country, during emergencies and serious disturbances, but that can also be put, in situations that are particularly serious nation-wide, under the control of the federal government by presidential decree.)

        https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/mar/20/us-military-trump-coronavirus-pandemic-new-york

        This is a link to a page, frequently updated, showing the number of cases found in the USA, state by state.

        https://www.theguardian.com/world/ng-interactive/2020/mar/18/coronavirus-map-us-latest-cases-state-by-state

        And this one is for news of what is going on in other countries, also updated frequently:

        https://www.theguardian.com/world/live/2020/mar/20/coronavirus-live-updates-outbreak-deaths-italy-uk-us-australia-europe-vaccine-china-global-economy-toll-latest-update-news

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

      • #2209329 Reply
        cyberSAR
        AskWoody Plus

        One of our local FD’s had their 2 thermometers break and were inaccurate today and couldn’t find one anywhere. Hospitals, pharmacies, suppliers, etc. had nothing to offer to them in a timely manner. After I thought about it awhile, I called a local veterinarian and he had a brand new one which he was willing to donate to the city. People helping people!

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2209361 Reply
        DriftyDonN
        AskWoody Plus

        Not certain where this should go….. Come tues, 24MArch, I will have been 14 days isolate. As suggested by cdc et al. I was not exposed to my knowledge and have no symptoms. So this was so important, now what? Am I safe? Can I go out and get food w/out fear?No. I am old and 14 days doesn’t change that! Truth is, it’s not 14 days- it’s until this is under control.

        • #2209432 Reply
          Paul T
          AskWoody MVP

          Not until everyone else you are likely to meet has been isolated for 14 days – and if they only started yesterday…

          You have to go out, to get food at a minimum, so keep your distance from others and wash your hands when you return – and be kind.

          cheers, Paul

          7 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2209580 Reply
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Using the national militaries, mainly in the ways explained in the following article, is becoming considered with increasing seriousness by decision-makers in an increasing number of countries:

        https://www.bbc.com/news/world-51984199?intlink_from_url=https://www.bbc.com/news/world&link_location=live-reporting-correspondent

        “This pandemic has come out of the blue. The severity of the initial outbreak was covered up; warning signals were not heeded; and in many countries the response was slow. Now it’s a question of mobilizing all national resources just as if it was a war.”

        “Some politicians may overdo the wartime rhetoric. But the military have to be prepared for any eventuality. General Sir Nicholas Carter, the head of Britain’s armed forces, has noted that the military must be “prepared to fight the war we may have to fight, and it is now clear, that moment has arrived”.

        Meanwhile, in Germany, certain measures have been taken that might explain the remarkable low number of deaths from COVID-19 reported there, as a percentage of the number of cases so far detected. These measures have been: testing many who live there or have just arrived from abroad and putting in quarantine those found to be infected, as well as treating those seriously ill in hospitals provided with sufficient resources marshaled in advance, from the moment the threat of a serious epidemic was recognized by experts as a distinct possibility, and providing all this for free to the public:

        https://www.euronews.com/2020/03/13/coronavirus-why-does-germany-have-so-few-covid-19-deaths

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

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      • #2210408 Reply
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        The British Prime Minister announced today a number of very strong measures to reduce movements of people, their outdoors gatherings and non-essential activities outside their home. Shops that are considered essential that stay open, such as grocery stores, pharmacies or supermarkets, will be allowed to operate; all others will be closed. Outings should be limited to: shopping for necessities such as food and medicines; seeking medical help; going out once a day max. for walks or runs; going to work, but only those who, because of the nature of what they do cannot work from home and only if their work is considered indispensable. Gatherings of people not living together are to be limited to two persons at the time. Police has been given powers to enforce these restrictions and will arrest and or fine those who break the rules. There is more, in the form of several of recommendations to the public:

        https://www.bbc.com/news/live/world-52000039

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

      • #2210448 Reply
        ScotchJohn
        AskWoody Plus

        Police has been given powers to enforce these restrictions and will arrest and or fine those who break the rules.

        If we had sufficient police, after more than a decade of running down police numbers and resources.

        Dell E5570 Latitude, Intel Core i5 6440@2.60 GHz, 8.00 GB - Win 10 Pro

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2210703 Reply
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        ScotchJohn: maybe is the intention that counts? Scaring enough people into compliance with minimum effort?

        Anyhow, until the announced measures are acted upon as fully as they can be and there has been some time to see what happens then, all I can think of is: let’s wait. Too early to tell — or judge.

        Repeating what I wrote earlier in another thread, something I took from an article written by Allan Vaughan on Italy’s lockdown, in last week’s “New Scientist” , quoting in turn at Mark Woolhouse, at the University of Edinburgh : “What is your exit strategy?” Meaning: is there already a plan to be put in practice from the very first day, after x weeks, when the measures are supposed to end? Although the exit strategy might just be to keep the measures in place for as long as the government can stand it. In some declarations he’s made, Johnson has said: “we are going to be flexible”, or words to that effect.

        Even if I am not living in the UK, but in the US, what is going to happen in the UK now is going to be interesting for us to follow from here too. Lessons to learn, errors to avoid… assuming there is still time for that. Lockdown measures are being implemented all over the map, it seems without a common protocol or much by way of coordination, which may not be the best way to go about dealing with a serious health crisis. But at least are attempts to muddle through, and for us humans, that might be just enough.

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

      • #2210831 Reply
        wavy
        AskWoody Plus

        A good read for perspective and has a ring of truth, but what do I know?

        https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/24/opinion/coronavirus-stimulus-economy-liquidity.html?auth=login-google&searchResultPosition=1

        When the threat of the virus spread has subsided, stimulus could be considered. The more important and immediate approach should emphasize help for those who suffer pay cuts, providing enough support to tide them over during the difficult period.

        Washington should be using every tool at its disposal to support American businesses and citizens economically. But how it does so matters. In a normal recession, monetary and fiscal stimulus might be appropriate. Today, though, our economic policies need to work in concert with our efforts to fight the pandemic. There will be a time for stimulus, but for now, what we need is enough liquidity to help weather the months ahead.

        🍻

        Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
      • #2210875 Reply
        Charlie
        AskWoody Plus

        Concerning the “being prepared for what’s coming” – it has been two weeks now that I and my wife have gone grocery shopping and have found the toilet paper, Kleenex, and paper towel shelves empty, bare, zilch, nada. The meat cases in one store were pretty much the same way as was the bread shelves, and this is for multiple supermarkets in our area.

        Please forgive me for asking but are there going to have to be toilet paper lines (as in soup lines)?  I think there may be some action maybe even involving the police to keep people from stripping the shelves bare in their hoarding sprees.

        Win 7 Still Alive, x64, Intel i3-2120 3.3GHz, Linux Mint 19.1

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2210878 Reply
        wavy
        AskWoody Plus

        Sadly sounds like there already is.
        I managed to get a pickup at our local Shoprite but not Toilet Paper, hand sanitizer, alcohol, Lysol spray. I ‘think’ I got a gallon of Bleach to clean off the packages of purchased groceries.
        I really will not know just what I DID get until pickup. I was lucky to get the time slot, there where no delivery slots open.
        ( I found out that stored bleach degrades over time just recently )
        https://www.scripps.edu/newsandviews/e_20060213/bleach.html

        Some items were quantity restricted, but they were listed as out..

        🍻

        Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
        • This reply was modified 2 weeks, 1 day ago by wavy.
        • This reply was modified 2 weeks, 1 day ago by wavy.
        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2210988 Reply
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        According to te BBC, the umber of COVID-19 counted cases has increased by nearly 10,000 in a single day, today, Wednesday 25th of March:

        https://www.bbc.com/news/live/world-52044452

        The number of cases in the US has jumped by 10,000 – bringing the total number of cases in the country to 54,453.

        According to the US CDC, the death toll also rose by 193 cases, bringing it to 737.

        The state of New York has more than half of the country’s overall cases – with more than 30,800 patients.

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

        • #2211148 Reply
          anonymous
          Guest

          OscarCP uses numbers for a living. You probably already know, but don’t make the distinction,

          According to te BBC, the umber of COVID-19 counted cases has increased by nearly 10,000 in a single day, today, Wednesday 25th of March:

          (Bolding added) Reasoning applied: some number larger than 10,000 test results returned positive in the prior 24 hrs. A very small number of these positive results were infected in the recent three days. A very large number have been walking around with minor symptoms or completely asymptomatic for several weeks. But had not yet been given a test, and had that result counted. As a global effort, we are still collecting facts that will be interpreted more correctly after this event has run its course. More results means a higher confidence. Remember to include the number not yet tested.

          • #2211176 Reply
            OscarCP
            AskWoody Plus

            Anonymous ( #2211148 ), I agree with your comment, because what you wrote by way of clarification that was, and still is, precisely my point. I take it that you are agreeing with me and reinforcing my point to make the case clearer for those that might miss what I was trying to convey with my comment.

            If so, I thank you.

            Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

            • This reply was modified 2 weeks ago by OscarCP.
      • #2211184 Reply
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        I posted this moments ago and it disappeared immediately after submitting a small correction to it. I don’t think it was removed by an MVP (why would it be?), but probably was a glitch in the system.

        The following article from BBC”Future” presents a summary of the way viruses and other microbes have caused devastating pandemics, resulting in many millions of deaths, throughout history. Turning to our times and the present crisis, it also says there that this was something that was not at all unexpected, at least by experts in infections diseases and the global crisis they may bring about, and could have been acted earlier to contain this COVID-19 one and in a more planed way than it actually has been. Much of that has been mentioned elsewhere, in usually reliable sources. For example, consider these excerpts from the same article:

        Over the past 15 years, there has been no shortage of articles and white papers issuing dire warnings that a global pandemic involving a new respiratory disease was only a matter of time. On BBC Future in 2018, we reported that experts believed a flu pandemic was only a matter of time and that there could be millions of undiscovered viruses in the world, with one expert telling us, “I think the chances that the next pandemic will be caused by a novel virus are quite good.” In 2019, US President Donald Trump’s Department of Health and Human Services carried out a pandemic exercise named “Crimson Contagion”, which imagined a flu pandemic starting in China and spreading around the world. The simulation predicted that 586,000 people would die in the US alone. If the most pessimistic estimates about Covid-19 come true, the far better named “Crimson Contagion” will seem like a day in the park.

        As of 26 March, there were more than 470,000 confirmed cases of Covid-19 around the world and more than 20,000 deaths, touching every continent save Antarctica. This was a pandemic, in reality, well before the World Health Organization finally declared it one on 11 March. And we should have seen it coming.

        https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20200325-covid-19-the-history-of-pandemics

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

        • #2211192 Reply
          PKCano
          Da Boss

          You were caught by the spam filter. That happens when the sequence of submit/edit/submit/edit is faster that the system update. Slow down between operations (breathe in, breathe out 🙂 )

          3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2211271 Reply
        Jones55
        AskWoody Plus

        –PEOPLE WITH NO SYMPTOMS!! and PEOPLE WITH BEGINNING SLIGHT SORE THROAT– are likely causing 55% of the total virus spread. Be aware of that!

        After a long time of uncertainty about the way the virus-transmissions occur (in relation of being part one of these 2 groups…
        (The confirmed infected people and “non” ill people with no symptoms) virologist Ab Osterhaus in the Netherlands warned that studies show that most likely 55% of the virus-transmissions occur in this group of people BELOW….

        –PEOPLE WITH NO SYMPTOMS!! and PEOPLE WITH BEGINNING SLIGHT SORE THROAT– are likely to cause 55% of the total virus transmission between people . Be aware of that!

        GOV measures Holland …18.000.000 people
        FOR NOW only testing done on people with flue\respiration problems…lack of test kits
        Social distancing 5 feet.. schools,bars etc are closed.
        Shops still open…but many holders close anyway out of precaution..and lack of custmrs.
        Dont go outside if you don’t need to
        Groups larger then 3 persons not allowed…also 5 feet apart
        Work from home if possible
        No visiting elderly in old folks homes etc.

        The past 2 days things have tightened and fines can be issued if regulations are not complied with..in my opinion this should have been done earlier.

        Stay save..i believe supermarkets are a great risk
        if you go shopping don’t touch your face
        not until ur home and unpacked and cleaned ur hands…maybe better to clean
        doorknobs u touched as well…(dish)soap and running water will do..
        I Throw my used keys in a cup of boiling hot water as well..few seconds

        Canned food en wrapped food in plastic, is rinsed with dish soap and water…

        All of this takes about 20 minutes…20 minutes out of a lifetime
        Had a pneumothorax 3 years ago so i better take some precautions.

        Many recovered patients will suffer lung damage (decreased lung capacity, scar-tissue) due to long respiration times.

        Stay save Lets hope the world will come out of this more united and not like its been as in “business as usual”

        My heart goes out to the all the people working in hospitals (risking of getting sick themselves due to lack of protection) and not to forget to the people dying (often in solitude due to the sheer numbers of people in need.)

        Try to stay save

        • This reply was modified 2 weeks ago by Jones55.
        • This reply was modified 2 weeks ago by Jones55.
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        • #2211335 Reply
          Paul T
          AskWoody MVP

          PEOPLE WITH NO SYMPTOMS!! and PEOPLE WITH BEGINNING SLIGHT SORE THROAT– are likely causing 55% of the total virus spread

          How do you arrive at that figure?

          cheers, Paul

      • #2211300 Reply
        Rick Corbett
        AskWoody_MVP

        clearer for those that might not be very good at reading things written without using bold fonts to mark the key words

        I use the ’emboldened keywords’ technique all the time ( 🙂 ), ever since I was taught it 35 years ago whilst studying for my PGCE Adult Education Teacher Training qualification here in the UK.

        Before getting into discussion of the psychology involved, the tutors demonstrated the technique beforehand by getting the class to read several paragraphs of text (without any bold formatting) on a board  then several more paragraphs with some emboldened keywords on another board. We were then sent out on a distraction break and – on our return 20 mins later – asked to reconstruct both blocks of text without being able to see the boards. Guess which was more accurately reproduced.

        I’ve dumped my course notes but – if I remember the details correctly – it has nothing to do with reading skills, comprehension or intelligence. It’s just how adults’ brains have been proven to work in conjunction with their other senses in assisting retention of information… in this case the brain’s ability to successfully reconstruct often abstract notions from a few emboldened keywords that catch one’s eyes.

        (This effect of ‘eyes to brain’ correlation and its effect on retention of information is similar to the reason why certain fonts are rarely, if ever used, for large blocks of texts aimed at adult readers. Basically, the brain doesn’t retain what the eyes subconsciously reject. Long blocks of Comic Sans appears to create more eye strain and fatigue in adults than other fonts like Garamond, Times Roman, etc. [Google ‘why is comic sans bad‘] So, if there’s some information that you *don’t* want adults to remember, just use Comic Sans [… call it another font exploit 🙂 ]).

        (Apologies for going off-topic.)

        Hope this helps…

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      • #2211467 Reply
        wavy
        AskWoody Plus

        –PEOPLE WITH NO SYMPTOMS!! and PEOPLE WITH BEGINNING SLIGHT SORE THROAT– are likely to cause 55% of the total virus transmission between people . Be aware of that!

        Links to articles are always nice!

        🍻

        Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
        • This reply was modified 2 weeks ago by wavy.
      • #2211529 Reply
        Jones55
        AskWoody Plus

        Hi Paul T,

        That number 55% was given by the Dutch virologist Ab Osterhaus in a informative independent tv broadcast.(yes… we have those over here)
        He is well known and also working on the vaccine.
        He made a pretty good prediction on how the scenario of the virus spread would go in the Netherlands. He is not related to our government.
        He warned earlier that our government should take bolder steps against the spread of the virus.Steps that have finally (for the most part at least) been taken a few days ago.

        In a few days we get more certainty if we got enough IC beds..Peak patients is then.. Although its crisis, we still manage for now.

        He went a step further than the R.I.V.M (which advices our government)

        What this number also entails is that people with No symptoms are not aware they’re spreading the virus..so they spread a lot of it if they mingle in crowds.This..until they they contact doctors because of symptoms, and get tested….if tested positive they get quarantined.
        This is why Ab also stressed to take good social distancing measures en uphold those.

        If the chain of infections is not broken and a relative small group of people ( lets say 6%) don’t comply..exponential spread still occurs.

        Every person (with no measures taken) infects (in average) TWO to THREE others.
        Thats why you have to take action soon!

        When the crisis started there was a huge discussion “on how infectious” people could be if they were infected, but having no symptoms yet…now you know…if infected..they can spread it..mostly through cough..tiny aerosol particles in the air at short distance..the closer to it the worse off course.

        An investigation on how infectious children are, is ongoing as we speak.. This in relation to opening schools in the future.

        CHEERS

        • #2211534 Reply
          Jones55
          AskWoody Plus

          I agree but i’d take his word for it.(and most goverments do as well based on other virologists…
          Why do you think “social distancing is in place?
          people with symptoms are told to stay at home..

          There are people with hardly any symptoms when infected.The first stage of infection…if those people go into crowds..

          Its important how you frame “symptoms” some with slight sore throat would not assume they are sick at all…

          It’s common sense.

        • #2211749 Reply
          Paul T
          AskWoody MVP

          That number 55% was given by the Dutch virologist Ab Osterhaus

          Doesn’t mean it’s right.
          The figure may be based on data from other viruses, but without the context we don’t know – which is why you should provide links to the source.

          cheers, Paul

      • #2211763 Reply
        Jones55
        AskWoody Plus

        Hi Paul,
        You should also see this numbers in context when measures like “social distancing and quarantines” are beginning to take place.
        People with lots of symptoms, spread around larger quantities of virus due to heavy sneezing, coughing.That’s why those people are told to stay at home…no brainer.. Over here people with very mild symptoms must stay at home also.

        Although people who sneeze and coughs more heavily, and therefore spread it more that way, these people contribute LESS to the overall
        virus spread because they get quarantined and are taken out of the equation.

        Yesterday there was another update given by Osterhaus.The virus is present in the throat and nasal cavities as you know.During the first stages of the infection large quantities of the virus are produced and present in those parts of the body.(testing is done through nasal throat swaps)
        Even at very short distance (one two feet) Talking to one another poses a risk.Depending somewhat on “how” you speak.Minute aerosol droplets with the virus can be produced when speaking…The risk may be smaller but its still there….

        Let me clearify a bit on the situation here.
        ONLY people with “corona symptoms INCLUDING SHORTNESS OF BREATH are tested in Holland.
        So you must be really sick to get a test.( measures are taken to be able to test more people later)

        People in healthcare, hospitals are tested more often.About 5% of the medical personnel in hospitals tested positive (week ago) and those infections could not be related to the corona “strands” hospitalized people had(luckily). There are different “strands” of the virus…(hope strands, is the correct word for it..in dutch its called stammen”

        This is also why our country shows much less infected people than for instance Germany (they test a lot more)
        The amount of death’s is a much better indication of how many people are infected.

        https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/#countries

        CHEERS

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      • #2211766 Reply
        Jones55
        AskWoody Plus

        You should see this in context whith what I wrote earlier..

        https://www.who.int/news-room/q-a-detail/q-a-coronaviruses#
        Can CoVID-19 be caught from a person who has no symptoms?
        The main way the disease spreads is through respiratory droplets expelled by someone who is coughing. The risk of catching COVID-19 from someone with no symptoms at all is very low. However, many people with COVID-19 experience only mild symptoms. This is particularly true at the early stages of the disease. It is therefore possible to catch COVID-19 from someone who has, for example, just a mild cough and does not feel ill.  WHO is assessing ongoing research on the period of transmission of COVID-19 and will continue to share updated findings

        https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prepare/transmission.html
        Can someone spread the virus without being sick?
        • People are thought to be most contagious when they are most symptomatic (the sickest).
        • Some spread might be possible before people show symptoms; there have been reports of this occurring with this new coronavirus, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.

        Its obvious government have to take in account they must not cause panic.
        I believe governments should be totally open about the facts and communicate this, so people can make up their minds as to what measures to take. But it’s also a tight balance between “not harming the economy” and “ eliminating the risks of getting infected”

        Be sensible…Corona spreads similarly like flu. (contaminated surfaces, cough, sneeze, aerosol, handshaking etc.) The biggest difference are the implications when getting the pneumomia. And end up in hosptital on a respirator for 3 or 4 weeks…that’s what we see here in many cases.

        https://www.webmd.com/lung/coronavirus#2-7
        How Does the New Coronavirus Spread?
        SARS-CoV-2, the virus, mainly spreads from person to person.
        Most of the time, it spreads when a sick person coughs or sneezes. They can spray droplets as far as 6 feet away. If you breathe them in or swallow them, the virus can get into your body. Some people who have the virus don’t have symptoms, but they can still spread the virus
        As to Ab Osterhaus..I dont have his telephone number…could give you the links on the broadcasts he was in…but that’s in Dutch…so you’d have to translate…

        Minimize the risks of getting infected. Stay save.
        CHEERS

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2211843 Reply
          anonymous
          Guest

          I really appreciate reading information from global sources. Thank you for contributing.

          (hope strands, is the correct word for it..in dutch its called stammen”

          In the US, I’m used to hearing the word “Strain” as a noun, rather than the action with extra effort, to stand for this subdivision of virus. Yours was easily understood in context.

      • #2211846 Reply
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Here two items in the news, one on the possible outcome, in the UK of “having done very well” if it is contained just so, in the end, there are no more than 20,000 deaths, according to the Director of their National Health System (England).

        If UK death toll is kept below 20,000, “we will have done very well” – NHS England medical director Prof Stephen Powis:”

        https://www.bbc.com/news/live/52075063

        And this other, about a very dangerous idea being spread mainly through “social” media, about using the most penetrating form of UV light to sterilize everything around the house and also oneself, the spouse, the kids, the cats and the dog:

        https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20200327-can-you-kill-coronavirus-with-uv-light

        According to this article, a few seconds to UV type “C” rays from a special lamp producing them is equivalent to spending a really long time outside, catching the Sun’s rays, and could result in virtually instantaneous skin cells’ damage leading to anything from brown spots later on, to skin cancer. So it will kill all the virus on you and it will also probably kill you too: don’t do it.

         

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2212037 Reply
        prachtexemplar
        AskWoody Lounger

        I’d like very much to continue to try and be a productive member of this community (the recent hiccups notwithstanding) and so I would like to share a few things that have come my way over the past few weeks or so. (Well, the last one I’ve had in my files for a bit.)

        Firstly, I had somebody offer me the link below, with some explanation of who released that report and basically why.
        COVID-19 coronavirus epidemic has a natural origin
        Date: March 17, 2020
        Source: Scripps Research Institute
        Summary: An analysis of public genome sequence data from SARS-CoV-2 and related viruses found no evidence that the virus was made in a laboratory or otherwise engineered.
        https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/03/200317175442.htm

        Next, I am going to copy/past three paragraphs from a Wall Street Journal article, and I am doing the copy/paste because that Wall Street Journal is terrible for loading if you are using anything except the latest super-fast browser on the latest super-fast OS. (Super-new browsers are not for security, but for the advertsing industry that has the horrid power to force companies to their will.)

        . . . . . <=> <=> <=> Copy Starts <=> <=> <=>
        Dr. Larson suggests half a teaspoon of liquid soap is enough, or a glob about the size of a quarter, although bigger hands might need more. Health experts say that too much soap can remove your skin’s natural oils, which have helpful antibacterial properties.

        The CDC says studies haven’t shown that soaps with antibacterial ingredients provide any health benefits or remove more germs than plain soaps. All soaps, however, can deactivate a coronavirus so it can no longer infect you.

        The new coronavirus, coined SARS-CoV-2, is a spherical structure with spiky proteins attached to a membrane, or envelope, that protects the pathogen’s genetic material. Once it comes into contact with soap, this envelope dissolves, leaving behind a dysfunctional virus.
        . . . . . <=> <=> <=> Copy Ends <=> <=> <=>

        If you are in possession of one of those James Bond browsers and a JB OS, then here is the WSJ link: https://www.wsj.com/articles/the-dos-and-donts-of-handwashing-11583952006
        (And I’ll apologize to the WSJ webmaster for removing the tag.)

        Finally a pdf link from the University of Arizona that loads rather easily and is quite good at explaining a few more things about washing hands and other things related to this topic.  It was released in 2017.
        https://cals.arizona.edu/agliteracy/sites/cals.arizona.edu.agliteracy/files/Hand-Sanitizer-Hand-Washing-Debate.pdf

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