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  • Customize the initial Windows 10 installation

    Posted on Rick Corbett Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Home Forums AskWoody support Windows Windows 10 Customize the initial Windows 10 installation

    • This topic has 21 replies, 1 voice, and was last updated 4 months ago.
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      • #1848606 Reply
        Rick Corbett
        AskWoody_MVP

        Putting to one side whether one *should* interrupt the Windows 10 installation process, this topic is about whether you *can*… and why on earth would you?

        The simple answer is ‘customisability’ and ‘consistency’ for *all* users. Organisations interrupt the initial, default Windows installation process all the time in order to build reference images and to amend the eventual Windows experience/environment (using something called an answerfile)… however you want to describe it.

        The benefits are a standard, consistent experience for *all* users of the Windows device. Even if you are the *only* user of a device, there are some advantages of amending the default account template before the first user account is created, e.g. by amending the Start menu so it’s clear of all pinned apps before the first connection to the Internet. Even outside of a business environment managed by membership of a ‘domain’ (rather than the home environment of a ‘workgroup’), it’s still possible for home users to enjoy some of the benefits of a pre-customised version of Windows.

        Note: This topic applies primarily to *clean* installations, not in-place upgrades. (If you’re carrying out an in-place upgrade then this is less efective.)

        Instead of a discourse on *whether to* (it’s your choice), here’s *how* to, using a clean install to upgrade from Windows 10 Home 1803 to Home 1809 as an example. I’m using a VM (virtual machine) so I can capture decent screenshots of the process but will use the term ‘PC’, just because it’s easier to understand.

        It goes without saying that you should only do this after ensuring you have copies of your data stored safely away from the PC you are going to wipe clean and/or have made a disk image as a complete backup before doing anything else. I do both so if all goes well then I need only restore the data I need.

        1. Before you do anything else, *right*-click on the Start button, select System and make a note of the System type and Edition… you’ll need this info.:

        01-system-about

        2. Turn off Win 10’s hybrid Fast Startup (it interferes with booting into the BIOS/UEFI) then shut down Windows. I use a script to disable Fast Startup but it’s just as easy to do via Power Options. (If you’re using a DVD as the Windows installer source then insert it *before* shutting the PC down and if you’re using a USB stick, insert it *before* powering on the PC again.)

        3. Power on your PC, press the key for the Boot Device menu and select your Windows installer  source to boot from – DVD or USB stick. The Boot Device menu key varies from manufacturer to manufacturer but is usually shown on the initial power-on screen. For example, Dell’s use F12 to get to the Boot Device menu.

        4. I’m using the equivalent of a dual-layer DVD with both 64-bit and 32-bit installer versions as the Windows installer source so I first need to select the architecture (bitness):

        02-boot-manager

        Choose the same architecture as the OS edition you are upgrading from (unless you’ve added RAM and the processor is 64-bit capable, in which case you can upgrade from a 32-bit version of Windows to 64-bit using the same digital license as the previous Windows installation).

        5. Windows Setup will begin so, after choosing your preferred language, time and currency format plus keyboard, you can begin the installation of Windows. After clicking on an Install now button the first thing you will be asked to do is enter information on an Activate Windows screen. You’re going to be reusing the PC’s previously-stored digital license so click on the I don’t have a product key link:

        03-activate-windows

        6. Next, choose the edition you want to install:

        04-choose-edition

        It’s tempting to think you can install a Pro edition instead of your PC’s previous Home edition… but it won’t activate automatically – so make sure you choose the same edition as the previous installation.

        <continued in another post due to file size restriction>

        • This topic was modified 1 year, 5 months ago by Rick Corbett.
        • This topic was modified 1 year, 5 months ago by Rick Corbett.
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      • #1848622 Reply
        Rick Corbett
        AskWoody_MVP

        7. On the next screen, accept the license terms, click Next then choose Custom: Install Windows only (advanced):

        05-custom-install

        8. On the next screen, select each partition in turn and click on Delete until you are left with just Drive 0 Unallocated Space. Click Next.

        07-unallocated-drive

        9. Windows will begin its installation and will eventually get to a Choose region screen:

        08-choose-region

        When you get to this screen, interupt the OOBE (Out Of the Box Experience) process by pressing the CTRL+SHIFT+F3 keys at the same time.

        10. You will end up logged on as Administrator (not just a member of the Administrators group) in Audit Mode at a Sysprep (System Preparation Tool) dialog on a default Windows desktop screen:

        09-sysprep

        This is where you can carry out customisations and have them all applied to Windows’ default acccount template. This means that every account created – the initial user account which, by default, is a member of the Administrators group – and all subsequent accounts will be based on the amended default account template.

        <continued in another post due to file size restriction>

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      • #1848629 Reply
        Rick Corbett
        AskWoody_MVP

        I carry out clean installs without being connected to the internet. The moment you connect to the internet the very chatty Windows 10 starts multiple 2-way conversations – activating itself, downloading Windows updates, AV definitions, Start menu tile updates and uploading telemetry data.

        For example, here’s the default Win 10 1809 Start menu:

        10-default-1809-start-menu

        I use a USB stick to copy over PowerShell scripts, AutoHotkey scripts (and the AutoHotkey executable) and REG files to configure aspects of Windows automatically – like turning off telemetry, creating 2 folders (Temp and Support) that I always use, configuring TEMP/TMP environment variables and PowerShell execution policy, removing built-in crapware, installing my preferred browser and amending default app settings, changing Windows’ ‘look and feel’ like changing File Explorer‘s default view to ‘Details’, amending privacy settings and cleaning up the Start menu, etc. All of these become the defaults for all accounts so you don’t need to carry out further amendments on individual accounts.

        11. The main PowerShell script is run by *right*-clicking on Start and opening a Windows PowerShell (Admin) elevated console, temporarily setting execution policy to ‘unrestricted’ (Set-ExecutionPolicy unrestricted) then running the PowerShell script.

        This uninstalls *all* the built-in crapware except for the Store and calculator (you choose the ‘GoodApps’ to retain). It also removes the Start menu layout and replaces it with a custom one with just the 3 shortcuts I want for Notepad, Paint and File Explorer. (I later add another for my preferred browser.)

        12. When I’ve finished customising I click on the OK button in the Sysprep dialog. (Do *not* tick the Generalize checkbox. This removes drivers and is only used to create a reference image for multiple different hardware platforms.) This reboots the PC back into the OOBE process where I continue installation of the first account as normal.

        This might seem like a lot of work but it doesn’t actually add much time once you get the hang of it. In addition to the initial account, if I create further user accounts – like a standard account for my own use – I don’t have to make the same changes I made to the initial account nor do I have to remove new copies of the same crapware I removed from the initial account.

        The new default Start menu for all users looks like this:

        11new-1809-start-menu

        That, basically, is it. I currently use a PowerShell script called Windows 10 Decrapifier (available from Spiceworks… but you have to subscribe to the group to gain access) to clean the PC of built-in apps and clean the Start menu of entries by creating a new XML layout template. Let me know if you want more info. I’m hoping to test a similar PowerShell collection called Windows10Debloater in the next week or so.

        I have REG files and scripts that I use, depending on who/what the device is for.

        REG:

        • Change privacy settings
        • Make changes to context menus. For example, remove context menu entries after  the associated app is uninstalled, e.g. ‘Edit with Paint 3D’ and ‘Edit with Photos’
        • Remove file associations to do with 3D (Paint/Print/Builder).
        • Amend Start menu and taskbar icons.
        • Remove the 3D Objects namespace from File Explorer.
        • Add preview handlers for script files to File Explorer.
        • Set default File Explorer view to ‘Details’ (after deleting views that have already been stored in Bags and BagMRU entries)
        • Show drive letters before volume name.
        • Turn off everything to do with gaming, including the entries in Settings.
        • Disable services like telemetry, Hyper-V and RetailDemo.
        • Manage Edge‘s default behaviour.
        • Turn off various notifications (e.g. Tips and Windows Welcome Experience).

        AutoHotkey:

        • Actions that need if/then logic. For example, if 64-bit do this, otherwise do that.
        • Actions that involve file/folder operations, e.g. creating folders.
        • Actions that have multiple choices (i.e. best invoked via a GUI)
        • Actions that require simplified and elevated access to PowerShell cmdlets (e.g. re-enabling SMBv1).
        • Actions that require elevated privileges, e.g. the functionality of ‘Run as administrator’.

        Note: AutoHotkey is not installed at this point so I run the scripts by dropping them on a copy of the AutoHotkey executable on the USB stick.

        PowerShell:

        Apart from uninstalling built-in crapware I don’t often use PowerShell as I’m not very familiar with it and find that it’s more complex than I need for most tasks which can be automated quicker using a REG file and/or AutoHotkey. When I do have to use it then I try to wrap the PowerShell cmdlet in AutoHotkey to make it easier for me than messing around with a console.

        Basically, if I have to do something more than once or twice then I try to script it. 🙂

        Hope this helps…

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      • #1848658 Reply
        doriel
        AskWoody Lounger

        This is great article. Thank you very much for that. I did this in the past, because I wanted to deploy Windows including apllications like Office, SAP, Adobe Reader, … They can be included in these images.

        I did this with computer completely offline too – so the activation didnt happen. I installed applications. Then I ran sysprep with parameters OOBE and Generalize. Sometimes, I had problems with pre-build apps (cortana, bubble-witch saga, miracle app, ..), that didnt let me start sysprep. Simply because Windows fetched different apps for different users – thats why I did it offline – no backgroung sniffing.

        But now I should be doing this every half year again, because of updating havoc by Micro$oft. Shame on you Microsoft, shame on you..

        Dell Latitude E6530, Intel Core i5 @ 2.6 GHz, 4GB RAM, W10 1809 Enterprise

        HAL3000, AMD Athlon 200GE @ 3,4 GHz, 8GB RAM, Fedora 29

      • #1848737 Reply
        cyberSAR
        AskWoody Plus

        I’ve deployed quite a few machines with Windows 10 Decrapifier and it works great. On a couple it hung and the fix is to open a second instance and let it run. Have had no issues with any of the machines (1809 and 1903).

        I’ve also tested running it on a couple existing installs for a single user and it seems to work fine.

      • #1848749 Reply
        BATcher
        AskWoody_MVP

        Rick: that’s a superb article!  I use Windows10DebloaterGUI.ps1 to get rid of most of the assorted rubbish.

        However, the main snag with this approach (IMHO) is that you have to know up front all the modifications you wish to apply!  I find that my modifications for a new operating system (account settings, HKLM and HKCU registry entries, network printer connections, and so on) are an incremental process over several weeks, if not months.  This is why I write a bunch of BATch files to apply the changes to each user account on each PC, or to each PC, at each location.  This doesn’t entirely solve the problem, but fortunately I can use RDP and log on to each PC and do the remaining work.

        The whole thing is tedious beyond measure…

        BATcher

        Ascetics go without, mystics go within.

        • #1848764 Reply
          Rick Corbett
          AskWoody_MVP

          @BATcher – Many thanks for the kind words. The thing is, IMO the method is generally regarded as solely for use within a business environment. I became interested in whether it also had its use in a home environment… and especially with devices running Home editions of Win 10.

          As such, I tried to pitch the topic in a way that a) Windows 10 users would find it easily (by posting in the ‘Win 10’ forum instead of elsewhere); and b) Home users might persevere with reading through the steps and perhaps post back with ‘can it do this’, ‘can it do that’ questions.

          If so then I’ll know whether to expand outside of this Audit Mode method into gently suggesting people look into (or just ask) whether very simple scripting –  REG files or AutoHotkey (or both) – could make their lives simpler… hence my  Free AutoHotkey ebook topic.

          IMO it’s a shame that ‘scripting’ is currently buried deep within the ‘DevOps’ forum so it’s unlikely most folks will ever realise scripting is just a tool and can often be very simple. Even ‘Learn to Code’ is buried within ‘Outside the box’. I think it just inadvertently gives the impression that ‘scripting’ is inherently ‘uber-geeky’ (which it very often isn’t, IMO) and puts people off for no good reason. 🙁

          This *isn’t* a criticism of AskWoody… just a reflection of the slightly different programming focus (VBA, etc.) that Windows Secrets Lounge had compared to the more patch-and-exploit focus here at AskWoody. (On WSL people were used to me boring the pants off them with my AutoHotkey posts. 🙂 )

          3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #1861102 Reply
        Rick Corbett
        AskWoody_MVP

        I’ve just carried out the above process on a Dell Latitude E7450 laptop and – initially – couldn’t halt the OOBE as described above. The volume was adjusted instead. Hmmm…

        It turned out that the Function keys at the top of the keyboard were active as Media control keys, not as F1-F12 Function keys.

        As a result I had to add the Fn key as well in order to interrupt the OOBE, i.e. use CTRL+SHIFT+Fn+F3 keys all together. Something for me to remember in future. 🙂

        Hope this helps…

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #1908068 Reply
        ssanss
        AskWoody Lounger

        Hi, could you post your reg files and scripts in text file format?

        Those new to windows 10 can review and learn from them.

         

        Thanks

        • #1908130 Reply
          Rick Corbett
          AskWoody_MVP

          @ssanss – Sure, no problem… I’ll have a go…

          Here’s a test REG file:

          Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00
          ; Always display full details when copying or moving files (1=Enabled / 0=Disabled)
          ; https://www.ghacks.net/2013/12/19/always-display-full-details-copying-moving-files-windows-8/
          
          [HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\OperationStatusManager]
          "EnthusiastMode"=dword:00000001
          

          Is that the sort of thing you wanted?

          • This reply was modified 1 year, 3 months ago by Rick Corbett.
        • #1908148 Reply
          Rick Corbett
          AskWoody_MVP

          Looks at first glance that I cannot post the scripts I use. My first attempt at posting an AutoHotkey script resulted in this:

          askwoody-fence

          It’s strange that other sites don’t have the same problem… for example:

          https://www.tenforums.com/general-support/131295-reassigning-keys-windows-10-a-post1619707.html#post1619707

          Attachments:
      • #1908132 Reply
        Rick Corbett
        AskWoody_MVP
        Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00
        ; Devices - Printers & scanners - Let Windows manage my default printer - Turn OFF
        
        [HKEY_CURRENT_USER\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Windows]
        "LegacyDefaultPrinterMode"=dword:00000001
        
        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #1908133 Reply
        Rick Corbett
        AskWoody_MVP

        Change the default Windows Explorer view to ‘Details’..

        Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00
        
        ; First delete the views that have already been stored (the keys will be re-created automatically)
        [-HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\Shell\Bags]
        [-HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\Shell\BagMRU]
        
        ; Now change the record store to Mode 4 (Details)
        [HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\Shell\Bags\AllFolders\Shell]
        "WFlags"=dword:00000000
        "Status"=dword:00000000
        "Mode"=dword:00000004
        "vid"="{137E7700-3573-11CF-AE69-08002B2E1262}"
        
      • #1908140 Reply
        Rick Corbett
        AskWoody_MVP

        Rather than post each one separately, I’ve attached a ZIP file (with attributions) containing the following:

        App Launch tracking – Turn OFF (default).reg
        App Launch tracking – Turn ON.reg
        Apps – Automatically install – DISABLE.reg
        Apps – Automatically install – ENABLE (Default).reg
        Automatically download device driver updates – Turn OFF.reg
        Automatically download device driver updates – Turn ON (Default).reg
        Console lock display off timeout – HIDE (default).reg
        Console lock display off timeout – SHOW.reg
        Context menu – Add ‘Open command window here as administrator’.reg
        Context menu – Command Prompt on Context Menu – ADD.reg
        Context menu – Command Prompt on Context Menu – REMOVE (default).reg
        Context menu – Edit with Paint 3D – ADD (default).reg
        Context menu – Edit with Paint 3D – REMOVE.reg
        Context menu – Edit with Photos – ADD (default).reg
        Context menu – Edit with Photos – REMOVE.reg
        Context menu – Open With option – ADD.reg
        Context menu – Open With option – REMOVE (default).reg
        Context menu – System Protection – ADD.reg
        Context menu – Take ownership – ADD.reg
        Context menu – Take ownership – REMOVE.reg
        Context menu – Take ownership with pause – ADD.reg
        Cortana – Disable Cortana but keep search – OFF (default).reg
        Cortana – Disable Cortana but keep search – ON.reg
        Cortana – Let Cortana respond to ‘Hey Cortana’ – Turn OFF.reg
        Cortana – Let Cortana respond to ‘Hey Cortana’ – Turn ON.reg
        Cortana – Lock screen – Use Cortana even when my device is locked – Turn OFF.reg
        Cortana – Lock screen – Use Cortana even when my device is locked – Turn ON.reg
        Cortana – Notifications – Turn OFF.reg
        Cortana – Notifications – Turn ON.reg
        Cortana – Search online and include web results – Turn OFF (1803).reg
        Cortana – Search online and include web results – Turn OFF.reg
        Cortana – Search online and include web results – Turn ON (default).reg
        Desktop – Display OS version (All Users) – REMOVE.reg
        Desktop – Display OS version (All Users) – SHOW.reg
        Desktop – Display OS version (Current User) – REMOVE.reg
        Desktop – Display OS version (Current User) – SHOW.reg
        Desktop – Display OS version and windir (All Users) – REMOVE.reg
        Desktop – Display OS version and windir (All Users) – SHOW.reg
        Desktop – Display OS version and windir (Current User) – REMOVE.reg
        Desktop – Display OS version and windir (Current User) – SHOW.reg
        Devices – Printers & scanners – Let Windows manage my default printer – Turn OFF.reg
        Devices – Printers & scanners – Let Windows manage my default printer – Turn ON (default).reg
        File Explorer – 3D Objects Folder – Remove (x32).reg
        File Explorer – 3D Objects Folder – Remove (x64).reg
        File Explorer – 3D Objects Folder – Restore (x32) (default).reg
        File Explorer – 3D Objects Folder – Restore (x64) (default).reg
        File Explorer – Always display full details when copying or moving files.reg
        File Explorer – Burn to disc – Add to right-click menu.reg
        File Explorer – Burn to disc – Remove from right-click menu.reg
        File Explorer – Change folder and search options.reg
        File Explorer – Default user folders in This PC – REMOVE (x64).reg
        File Explorer – Default user folders in This PC – RESTORE (x64).reg
        File Explorer – OneDrive – Hide OneDrive From File Explorer (x32).reg
        File Explorer – OneDrive – Hide OneDrive From File Explorer (x64).reg
        File Explorer – OneDrive – OneDrive Integration – DISABLE.reg
        File Explorer – OneDrive – OneDrive Integration – ENABLE (default).reg
        File Explorer – OneDrive – Restore OneDrive to File Explorer (x32).reg
        File Explorer – OneDrive – Restore OneDrive to File Explorer (x64).reg
        File Explorer – OneDrive – Stop OneDrive from running at Startup.reg
        File Explorer – Open File Explorer to ‘Quick access’ (default).reg
        File Explorer – Open File Explorer to ‘This PC’.reg
        File Explorer – Preview Handlers – Add AHK.reg
        File Explorer – Preview Handlers – Add PS1.reg
        File Explorer – Preview Handlers – Add VBS.reg
        File Explorer – Preview Handlers for multiple script files.reg
        File Explorer – Set File Explorer view to ‘Details’.reg
        File Explorer – Show Drive Letters Before (All Users) – DISABLE.reg
        File Explorer – Show Drive Letters Before (All Users) – ENABLE.reg
        File Explorer – Show Drive Letters Before (Current User) – DISABLE.reg
        File Explorer – Show Drive Letters Before (Current User) – ENABLE.reg
        File Explorer – Turn Notifications OFF.reg
        File Explorer – Turn Notifications ON.reg
        Gaming – Game DVR and Game Bar – DISABLE.reg
        Gaming – Game DVR and Game Bar – ENABLE (default).reg
        Gaming – GameBar – Turn OFF.reg
        Gaming – GameBar – Turn ON (default).reg
        Gaming – Gaming entry in Settings – Turn OFF.reg
        Gaming – Gaming entry in Settings – Turn ON (default).reg
        Hibernate – DISABLE.reg
        Hibernate – ENABLE (disable).reg
        Keyboard – Autocorrect misspelt words I type – OFF (default).reg
        Keyboard – Autocorrect misspelt words I type – ON.reg
        Keyboard – NumLock ON from boot.reg
        Keyboard – Show text suggestions as I type – OFF (default).reg
        Keyboard – Show text suggestions as I type – ON.reg
        MenuShowDelay – Make Faster.reg
        Microsoft Edge – automatic actions – DISABLE.reg
        Microsoft Edge – automatic actions – ENABLE (default).reg
        Microsoft Edge – Page prediction – Turn OFF.reg
        Microsoft Edge – Page prediction – Turn ON (default).reg
        Microsoft Edge – Pre-launch – DISABLE.reg
        Microsoft Edge – Pre-launch – ENABLE (default).reg
        Microsoft Edge – Preload Start and New Tab page – DISABLE.reg
        Microsoft Edge – Preload Start and New Tab page – ENABLE (default).reg
        Network & Internet – Allow Windows to manage homegroup connections (recommended).reg
        Network & Internet – Ethernet as metered connection – Turn ON.reg
        Network & Internet – Ethernet as metered connection- Turn OFF.reg
        Network & Internet – Set Unidentified Networks to Not Configured (default).reg
        Network & Internet – Set Unidentified Networks to Private.reg
        Notifications – Show me the Windows welcome experience after updates and occasionally when I sign in – DISABLED.reg
        Notifications – Show me the Windows welcome experience after updates and occasionally when I sign in – ENABLED (default).reg
        Notifications – Show me tips about Windows – Turn OFF.reg
        Notifications – Show me tips about Windows – Turn ON (default).reg
        Notifications – Windows Welcome Experience – Turn OFF.reg
        Notifications – Windows Welcome Experience – Turn ON (Default).reg
        Notifications & Actions – Turn OFF.reg
        Notifications & Actions – Turn ON.reg
        Performance – Reduce Shutdown Time.reg
        Personalisation – Advertising Info – Turn OFF.reg
        Personalisation – Consumer Experience – Turn OFF.reg
        Personalisation – Consumer Experience – Turn ON (default).reg
        Personalisation – Control Panel – Small icons view – Turn OFF (default).reg
        Personalisation – Control Panel – Small icons view – Turn ON.reg
        Personalisation – Customer Experience Improvement Program – Turn OFF.reg
        Personalisation – Customer Experience Improvement Program – Turn ON (default).reg
        Personalisation – Desktop – Clear Desktop Background History.reg
        Personalisation – Desktop context menu – Empty Folder – ADD.reg
        Personalisation – Desktop context menu – Empty Folder – REMOVE (default).reg
        Personalisation – Desktop context menu – Pin to Quick Access – ADD.reg
        Personalisation – Desktop context menu – System Protection – ADD.reg
        Personalisation – Desktop context menu – System Protection – REMOVE (default).reg
        Personalisation – Desktop context menu – Take Ownership – ADD.reg
        Personalisation – Desktop context menu – Take Ownership with Pause – ADD.reg
        Personalisation – Desktop context menu – Windows Firewall – ADD.reg
        Personalisation – Desktop context menu – Windows Firewall – REMOVE (default).reg
        Personalisation – Hidden items – Add to context menu.reg
        Personalisation – Hidden items – Remove from context menu.reg
        Personalisation – Lock Screen – NoLockScreen.reg
        Personalisation – Lock Screen – Stop adverts on the Lock screen.reg
        Personalisation – Night Light – DISABLE (default) (1809).reg
        Personalisation – Night Light – ENABLE (1809).reg
        Personalisation – Online tips – Turn OFF.reg
        Personalisation – Online tips – Turn ON (default).reg
        Personalisation – Scrollbar width 17 pixels (default).reg
        Personalisation – Scrollbar width 25 pixels.reg
        Personalisation – Snip-to-Clipboard on right-click context menu – ADD.reg
        Personalisation – Snip-to-Clipboard on right-click context menu – REMOVE.reg
        Personalisation – Start – Disable Start Menu Suggestions.reg
        Personalisation – Start – Live Tiles – Clear notifications – DISABLE.reg
        Personalisation – Start – Live Tiles – Clear notifications – ENABLE.reg
        Personalisation – Start – Live Tiles – Turn OFF and clear notifications.reg
        Personalisation – Start – Live Tiles – Turn OFF.reg
        Personalisation – Start – Occasionally show suggestions in Start – Turn OFF.reg
        Personalisation – Start – Occasionally show suggestions in Start – Turn ON (default).reg
        Personalisation – Start – Show File Explorer – Turn OFF.reg
        Personalisation – Start – Show File Explorer – Turn ON.reg
        Personalisation – Start – Use CMD on right-click powermenu.reg
        Personalisation – Start – Use PowerShell on right-click power menu (default).reg
        Personalisation – Taskbar – Always show all icons in the Notification Area – Turn OFF (default).reg
        Personalisation – Taskbar – Always show all icons in the Notification Area – Turn ON.reg
        Personalisation – Taskbar – Intel Graphics – Notification Tray icon – HIDE.reg
        Personalisation – Taskbar – Intel Graphics – Notification Tray icon – SHOW (default).reg
        Personalisation – Taskbar – Mail – PIN (default).reg
        Personalisation – Taskbar – Mail – UNPIN.reg
        Personalisation – Taskbar – Task View button – PIN (default).reg
        Personalisation – Taskbar – Task View button – UNPIN.reg
        Privacy – Activity History – DISABLE.reg
        Privacy – Activity History – ENABLE (default).reg
        Privacy – Background apps – Alarms & clocks – Turn OFF.reg
        Privacy – Background apps – Alarms & clocks – Turn ON (default).reg
        Privacy – Background apps – All – Turn OFF.reg
        Privacy – Background apps – All – Turn ON (default).reg
        Privacy – Background apps – Get Office – Turn OFF.reg
        Privacy – Background apps – Get Office – Turn ON (default).reg
        Privacy – Background apps – Maps – Turn OFF.reg
        Privacy – Background apps – Maps – Turn ON (default).reg
        Privacy – Background apps – Messaging – Turn OFF.reg
        Privacy – Background apps – Messaging – Turn ON (default).reg
        Privacy – Background apps – Music – Turn OFF.reg
        Privacy – Background apps – Music – Turn ON (default).reg
        Privacy – Background apps – People – Turn OFF.reg
        Privacy – Background apps – People – Turn ON (default).reg
        Privacy – Background apps – Phone – Turn OFF.reg
        Privacy – Background apps – Phone – Turn ON (default).reg
        Privacy – Background apps – Photos – Turn OFF.reg
        Privacy – Background apps – Photos – Turn ON (default).reg
        Privacy – Background apps – Skype video – Turn OFF.reg
        Privacy – Background apps – Skype video – Turn ON (default).reg
        Privacy – Background apps – Store – Turn OFF.reg
        Privacy – Background apps – Store – Turn ON (default).reg
        Privacy – Background apps – Twitter – Turn OFF.reg
        Privacy – Background apps – Twitter – Turn ON (default).reg
        Privacy – Background apps – Weather – Turn OFF.reg
        Privacy – Background apps – Weather – Turn ON (default).reg
        Privacy – Background apps – Windows Communications Apps – Turn OFF.reg
        Privacy – Background apps – Windows Communications Apps – Turn ON (default).reg
        Privacy – Background apps – Windows Content Delivery Manager – Turn OFF.reg
        Privacy – Background apps – Windows Content Delivery Manager – Turn ON (default).reg
        Privacy – Background apps – Windows Cortana – Turn OFF.reg
        Privacy – Background apps – Windows Cortana – Turn ON (default).reg
        Privacy – Background apps – Windows Phone – Turn OFF.reg
        Privacy – Background apps – Windows Phone – Turn ON (default).reg
        Privacy – Background apps – Xbox – Turn OFF.reg
        Privacy – Background apps – Xbox – Turn ON (default).reg
        Privacy – Camera – Let all apps use my camera – Turn OFF.reg
        Privacy – Camera – Let all apps use my camera – Turn ON.reg
        Privacy – Camera – Let individual apps use my camera – Turn OFF.reg
        Privacy – Camera – Let individual apps use my camera – Turn ON.reg
        Privacy – Contacts – Choose apps that can access contacts – Turn OFF.reg
        Privacy – Contacts – Choose apps that can access contacts – Turn ON.reg
        Privacy – Let apps access and send email – Turn OFF.reg
        Privacy – Let apps access and send email – Turn ON (default).reg
        Privacy – Let apps access my calendar – Turn OFF.reg
        Privacy – Let apps access my calendar – Turn ON (default).reg
        Privacy – Let apps access my call history – Turn OFF.reg
        Privacy – Let apps access my call history – Turn ON (default).reg
        Privacy – Let apps access my name, picture and other account info – Turn OFF.reg
        Privacy – Let apps access my name, picture and other account info – Turn ON (default).reg
        Privacy – Let apps control radios – Turn OFF.reg
        Privacy – Let apps control radios – Turn ON (default).reg
        Privacy – Let apps read or send messages – Turn OFF.reg
        Privacy – Let apps read or send messages – Turn ON (default).reg
        Privacy – Let apps use my advertising ID for experiences across apps – Turn OFF.reg
        Privacy – Let apps use my advertising ID for experiences across apps – Turn ON (default).reg
        Privacy – Let websites provide locally relevant content by accessing my language list – Turn OFF.reg
        Privacy – Let websites provide locally relevant content by accessing my language list – Turn ON (default).reg
        Privacy – Location services for this account – Turn OFF.reg
        Privacy – Location services for this account – Turn ON.reg
        Privacy – Media Player – CEIP tracking – DISABLE.reg
        Privacy – Media Player – CEIP tracking – ENABLE (default).reg
        Privacy – Microphone – Let all apps use my microphone – Turn OFF.reg
        Privacy – Microphone – Let all apps use my microphone – Turn ON (default).reg
        Privacy – Send Microsoft info about how I write to help us improve typing and writing in the future – Turn OFF .reg
        Privacy – Send Microsoft info about how I write to help us improve typing and writing in the future – Turn ON (default).reg
        Privacy – Send your device data to Microsoft – Basic.reg
        Privacy – Send your device data to Microsoft – Enhanced.reg
        Privacy – Send your device data to Microsoft – Full (Recommended).reg
        Privacy – Send your device data to Microsoft – None.reg
        Privacy – Speech, inking & typing – Getting to know you – Turn OFF.reg
        Privacy – Speech, inking & typing – Getting to know you – Turn ON.reg
        Privacy – Sync with devices – Turn OFF.reg
        Privacy – Sync with devices – Turn ON (default).reg
        Privacy – Turn on SmartScreen Filter to check web content (URLs) that Windows Store apps use – Turn OFF.reg
        Privacy – Turn on SmartScreen Filter to check web content (URLs) that Windows Store apps use – Turn ON (default).reg
        Privacy – Windows should ask for my feedback – Always.reg
        Privacy – Windows should ask for my feedback – Automatically (recommended).reg
        Privacy – Windows should ask for my feedback – Never.reg
        Privacy – Windows should ask for my feedback – Once a day.reg
        Privacy – Windows should ask for my feedback – Once a week.reg
        Remove_Open_command_window_here_as_Administrator.reg
        Remove_Pin_to_Quick_access_from_Context_Menu.reg
        Remove_Take_Ownership_from_context_menu.reg
        Remove_Toggle_Start_from_Context_Menu.reg
        Services – Clipboard History (1809) – Turn OFF (default).reg
        Services – Clipboard History (1809) – Turn ON.reg
        Services – Clipboard User Service (1809) – Start – DISABLED.reg
        Services – Clipboard User Service (1809) – Start – ENABLED (default).reg
        Set Multiple View Settings.reg
        Settings – Clear recent colors.reg
        Settings – Mixed reality – ADD (default).reg
        Settings – Mixed reality – REMOVE.reg
        Settings – Phone entry – Turn OFF.reg
        Settings – Update & Security – Windows Insider Program page – ADD (default).reg
        Settings – Update & Security – Windows Insider Program page – REMOVE.reg
        Sounds – Windows startup, logon, logoff sounds – OFF (default).reg
        Sounds – Windows startup, logon, logoff sounds – ON.reg
        System – Multi-tasking – Timeline – Suggestions – Turn OFF.reg
        System – Multi-tasking – Timeline – Suggestions – Turn ON (default).reg
        System – Notifications & actions – DISABLE changes to toggle state.reg
        System – Notifications & actions – ENABLE changes to toggle state (default).reg
        System – Notifications & actions – REMOVE changes to toggle state.reg
        System – Time – Time Sources.reg
        System Messages – VerboseStatus – OFF (default).reg
        System Messages – VerboseStatus – ON.reg
        System Restore Points – Disable Frequency Restriction.reg
        Turn off Suggested Apps.reg
        Update & Security – Windows Defender – Automatic sample submission – Turn OFF.reg
        Update & Security – Windows Defender – Automatic sample submission – Turn ON (default).reg
        Update & Security – Windows Defender – Cloud-based Protection – Turn OFF.reg
        Update & Security – Windows Defender – Cloud-based Protection – Turn ON (default).reg
        Update & Security – Windows Defender – Disable telemetry options.reg
        Update & Security – Windows Defender – Disable completely.reg
        Update & Security – Windows Defender – Notifications – Turn OFF.reg
        Update & Security – Windows Defender – Notifications – Turn ON (default).reg
        Update & Security – Windows Defender – Re-enable.reg
        Update & Security – Windows Defender – Restore default telemetry options.reg
        Update & Security – Windows Defender – Scan with Windows Defender – Add to Context menu.reg
        Update & Security – Windows Defender – Scan with Windows Defender – Remove from Context menu.reg
        Update & Security – Windows Update – Automatic device driver updates – Turn OFF.reg
        Update & Security – Windows Update – Automatic device driver updates – Turn ON (default).reg
        Update & Security – Windows Update – Automatic Driver Updates – DISABLE.reg
        Update & Security – Windows Update – Automatic Driver Updates – ENABLE (default).reg
        Update & Security – Windows Update – Uploading of Windows Updates-Turn OFF.reg
        Update & Security – Windows Update – Uploading of Windows Updates-Turn ON.reg
        Update Orchestrator service (1903) default.reg
        USB – Disable Write Protection.reg
        USB – Enable Write Protection.reg
        w10-web-search-disable.reg
        w10-web-search-disable-undo.reg
        Win 10 Startup Delay – DISABLE.reg
        Win 10 Startup Delay – ENABLE (default).reg
        Windows Error Reporting – DISABLE.reg

        Win-10-Reg-files

        Hope this helps…

        Attachments:
        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #1908518 Reply
        ssanss
        AskWoody Lounger

        Thank you very much, any chance of posting your autohotkey scripts in just a txt file?

         

      • #1936957 Reply
        wavy
        AskWoody Plus

        Let me know if you want more info. I’m hoping to test a similar PowerShell collection called Windows10Debloater in the next week or so.

        Rick did you try Windows10Debloater yet?

        🍻

        Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
        • #1943685 Reply
          Rick Corbett
          AskWoody_MVP

          My apologies, @wavy… I haven’t been very active online at all just recently.

          Yes, I tried Windows10Debloater but quickly realised that I had no wish for an interactive script, just a ‘silent’ debloater I could ‘fire and forget’ from within ‘Audit Mode’… so I looked at the author’s Windows10SysPrepDebloater script.

          The problem is that I have no clue about PowerShell and found the Windows 10 Decrapifier script I mentioned earlier just easier to navigate, understand and adapt to my own preferences, despite the additional hoop of having to join a Spiceworks group to get access to the script (hence why I’m not going to repost it here).

          Hope this helps…

      • #1937264 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        Wavy, Abbodi86 has a good telemetry script file for 8.1, and I mentioned to abbod186 there is a guy with one for Windows 10. He has many items to disable in Windows 10 and wanted a one-click method. Some are interesting.

        See this askwoody post.

        How much telemetry is going out with this month’s “Security-only” Win7 patch?

      • #1958264 Reply
        EP
        AskWoody_MVP

        one thing Rick did not mention is during setup, it may ask to connect to the internet (or establish an internet connection). do not do this during initial setup or users may be forced to create a Microsoft account.

        I always install Win10 locally first, then once win10 is fully installed, setup the internet connection afterwards.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2009485 Reply
        JoeP
        AskWoody Plus

        Hi Rick,

        Will this process work on new Win 10 machines from Dell or are they already set up upon arrival?

        JP

        • #2020743 Reply
          Rick Corbett
          AskWoody_MVP

          @joep – Sorry but I don’t know. I don’t have the money to buy a new Win 10 machine to test… so I’m limited to testing on the latest Dell laptops I have available to me (and a recently-acquired Lenovo tablet hybrid <shudder>).

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2285318 Reply
        Rick Corbett
        AskWoody_MVP

        So, I’ve just carried out the above process on a Lenovo MIIX Ideapad convertible tablet.

        The process was identical, although – initially – I couldn’t halt the OOBE as described above. The volume was adjusted instead.

        As per my previous posts, the Function keys at the top of the keyboard were active as Media control keys, not as F1-F12 Function keys.

        I added the Fn key as well in order to interrupt the OOBE, i.e. use CTRL+SHIFT+Fn+F3 keys all together yet it still didn’t work initially. It was only *multiple* presses of CTRL+SHIFT+Fn+F3 together that triggered the OOBE halt and dumped it into Sysprep’s Audit mode.

        Again, something for me to remember in future. 🙂

        Apart from the multiple tapping of the 4 keys together, everything else is unchanged from my original post(s)… although I’ve added a lot more to the original Windows 10 Decrapifier script I originally obtained via Spiceworks.

        Hope this helps…

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