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  • Dear Microsoft, could you make Edge a little more obnoxious?

    Home Forums AskWoody blog Dear Microsoft, could you make Edge a little more obnoxious?

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      • #2298872 Reply
        woody
        Da Boss

        So I’m sitting here plunking away on one of my production Win10 version 1909 machines, when a new update appears. 2020-08 Microsoft Edge Update for Wi
        [See the full post at: Dear Microsoft, could you make Edge a little more obnoxious?]

        8 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2298875 Reply
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        Edge should have been downloaded and installed manually months ago to replace the old legacy Edge even if you didn’t intend to use the browser.

        • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 5 days ago by Alex5723.
        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2298895 Reply
        WCHS
        AskWoody Plus

        Why doesn’t KB4576754 show up in the MS Catalog?

        Offline: Win7Pro ∙ SP1 ∙ x64
        Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-6500U ∙ RAM 12GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender
        Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-8565U ∙ RAM 16GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender

      • #2298906 Reply
        dononline
        AskWoody Plus

        My problem is that on one of my laptops, Windows keeps bugging, uh, begging me to install Chredge, but every time I try, I get the message that Chredge works best when my computer is fully updated, so do it and then come back to install it. The problem is I keep getting this message even when the laptop is fully updated. Catch 22.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2298921 Reply
        bbearren
        AskWoody MVP

        On my five fully-updated Windows 2004 Pro Version 19041.508 machines, all of which have Firefox as the default browser, Chredge has appeared on only my NAS, and without fanfare.  It just arrived as a desktop shortcut and an icon on the Taskbar.

        It did not launch, nor did it take me on a tour.  I haven’t launched it, either, don’t know what it looks like.

        Interesting.

        Create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates, in case you need to start over!
        "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns
        "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

        • #2298977 Reply
          woody
          Da Boss

          Sounds like the behavior of the original Chredge.

          This one has more teeth. 🙂

          • #2299277 Reply
            bbearren
            AskWoody MVP

            Sounds like the behavior of the original Chredge. This one has more teeth. 🙂

            I had not visited the B side of my laptop for some time, so I decided to take a look there and click on Check for updates.  I got the Chredge update that tried to take me on the same tour after the restart (I also got a couple other updates, as well), but I wouldn’t let it.

            I clicked Start > All Programs > Windows System > Right-clicked Task Manager and selected Run as administrator.  When Task Manager opened, I expanded the Microsoft Edge entry, selected the grand tour tab (that’s not what it actually said) and clicked “End task” at the bottom right.

            Chredge closed completely.  I unpinned it from the Taskbar, deleted the shortcut on my Desktop.  I then opened Services.msc Run as administrator, found all the services for Microsoft Edge and disabled them (despite the ominous warnings).

            I then restarted, ran Windows update again, and it found a signature update for Windows Defender, downloaded and installed it.  I did another restart, ran a quick check on the installation, and everything seems to be just fine.

            No more Chredge.

            Create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates, in case you need to start over!
            "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns
            "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

            2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2298919 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        Does crEdge install even with Updates set to paused because I’m not really interested in any MS browser but I’ve paused updates and that should include any updates but Defender definition updates.

        I only have a local login so no MS account there and I’m not about to change that for anything!

        • #2298983 Reply
          RTEsysadmin
          AskWoody Plus

          You may not want Chredge, but you should keep it up-to-date, anyway. Windows uses it as the mandatory go-to browser engine for displaying messages and help. And when you see all your File Browser windows refresh simultaneously (which happens often if you select “Launch folder windows in a separate process”), that’s Chredge.

          File Browser is a web browser.

          They’re doing with Chredge what got them sued over IE. You can’t not use it even if you try to not use it.

          Group K(ill me now)
      • #2298947 Reply

        “…a little more obnoxious?”

        I refer you to “The Hucksters”, an old movie in which Sydney Greenstreet, playing an obnoxious advertising executive, yells out his ad formula:

        “Irritate, irritate, IRRITATE, knock ’em dead!”

        <sigh>

        Win7 Pro SP1 64-bit ESU, Dell Latitude E6330, Intel CORE i5 "Ivy Bridge", Group "Patch List", Multiple Air-Gapped backup drives in different locations, "Don't auto-check for updates-Full Manual Mode." Linux Mint Greenhorn
        --
        "A committee is the only known form of life that has at least four legs and no brain."

        -Robert Heinlein

        3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2298957 Reply
        geekdom
        AskWoody Plus

        July 2020

        Win10Pro 1909.18363.959 x64 i3-3220 RAM8GB HDD Firefox79.0
        2020-05 Microsoft Edge Update for Windows 10 Version 1909 for x64-based Systems (KB4559309) was offered and installed via Windows Update on this machine.
        https://www.askwoody.com/forums/topic/windows-updates-bifurcated-mess/#post-2283538

        ———-

        Win10Pro 1909.18363.1082 x64 i5-9400 RAM16GB HDD Firefox82.0b3
        Microsoft Edge Update for Windows 10 Version 1909 for x64-based Systems was not ever offered on this machine.

        G{ot backup} TestBeta
        offline▸ Win10Pro 1909.18363.959 x64 i3-3220 RAM8GB HDD Firefox79.0 WindowsDefender
        online▸ Win10Pro 1909.18363.1139 x64 i5-9400 RAM16GB HDD Firefox83.0b1 WindowsDefender
        TargetReleaseVersion=1909
        WUMgr
        • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 5 days ago by geekdom.
      • #2298976 Reply
        ve2mrx
        AskWoody Plus

        I’d ctrl-shift-esc and kill the sucker process! Or use the great Process Explorer to do the same!

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2298975 Reply
        kandb
        AskWoody Plus

        Man, I haven’t posted a comment for a very long time.  But when I saw the headline to the story about Edge and read the content my thought was that I am so happy that I’ve stayed with Win8.1 update and let it do the work.  No ongoing, continuing hassles of Win10 whatever the version one had downloaded, installed and tried to use.  Nothing to worry about with Edge.  Win8.1, as Woody often says, IS apparently the most stable.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2299081 Reply
          Noel Carboni
          AskWoody_MVP

          I have one hardware system still running Win 8.1. Nice system, super stable, just 42 processes to support an empty desktop.

          Trouble is it’s growing a bit long in the tooth. It already won’t run Photoshop as of Photoshop 2020. And there are other things that only work because their developers had been keeping up Windows 7 support. Don’t look now but pretty much every developer is going to drop support of Windows 7 entirely very soon. A shame as it was a very nice and productive setup.

          -Noel

          1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2299158 Reply
          anonymous
          Guest

          Same sentiment here! My main system (a Dell desktop) came with Windows 10 but not long after I wiped it and installed 8.1 Pro and have never looked back. The system is rock solid and nothing updates with my explicit permission. It’s a great feeling knowing the OS is completely under my control again something I never felt with 10 which will never touch my hardware again!

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2298981 Reply
        Tom-R
        AskWoody Plus

        This new Chredge incident is just the latest in a long string of such behavior by Microsoft.  And it’s just more reason than ever to stop relying on Win10’s Windows Update settings to try and control how and when updates get installed.

        For most of this year now, I’ve been using David Xanatos’ WUMgr to manage updates on my Win10 systems; and (at least so far) I have never had a single update pushed onto any of those systems without me selecting and approving it first.  Yes, WUMgr is a third-party utility; but quite honestly I trust WUMgr a whole lot more than I do Microsoft.

        5 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2298994 Reply
        KB6OJS
        AskWoody Plus

        Actually, the new Edge has one very nice use: it can make stand-alone apps out of web pages.  I found a really nice radio station while I was visiting Palm Springs, CA last week (kwxy.com), and although they have apps for Android and iOS they don’t have one for Windows.  So I went to the website with “Chredge” (as you all call it) and used the new feature to create an app from it.  I can then bring up just that station in a separate window, as though it were a Microsoft Store app, and listen to the station that way without having to open a separate tab in Chrome.  I can also put it in the Startup options so it comes up when I boot Windows.  (Yes, I like the station that much!)  I live in Corona, CA (and no, doggone it, the virus isn’t our fault! 🙂 ) well outside the broadcast range of the station, and I don’t always want to tie up my phone to listen to it with their Android app, so this works nicely.

        • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 4 days ago by KB6OJS.
        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2299470 Reply
          Elrod
          AskWoody Plus

          Thanks for the tip.  Not a lot of radio stations like this around anymore.

           

          Group "L": Linux Mint

          • #2299650 Reply
            KB6OJS
            AskWoody Plus

            My pleasure.  And those that are around are usually not well funded so they don’t have any apps of their own.  This one fortunately has apps for Android and iOS but not for Windows or MacOS.  For those that only have a simple audio stream from a web page and nothing more, this feature comes in handy.  (I haven’t tried this feature yet on Android, so that’s a project for this week.)  //Steve//

      • #2299019 Reply
        gborn
        AskWoody_MVP

        Why doesn’t KB4576754 show up in the MS Catalog?

        Because the update is there to enslave and torture consumers – you won’t find that in managed enterprise environments – read the notes of KB4576754:

        Important

        • This update is not intended to target Windows Update for Business (WUfB) managed devices.
        • To get this update for the new Microsoft Edge for Windows 10, version 1803, see KB4576753.

        [sic]

        BTW: In the old kb article MS wrote ‘You do not have to restart your device after you apply this update.’ Obviously they changed their mind, if I understand Woody’s original post …

        Microsoft Windows Insider MVP, Microsoft Answers Community Moderator, Blogger, Book author

        https://www.borncity.com/win/

        • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 4 days ago by gborn.
        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2299022 Reply
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        I see that Shawn Brink on Tenforums has a registry hack to keep Windows Update from installing Chredge. Far as I’m concerned, MS can install it — after all, it is their machine (cough) — but I’m not going to use it for a while.

        Why tangle your fingers in the spaghetti of a registry hack when Microsoft issued a tool to block ChrEdge – Blocker Toolkit ?

        • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 4 days ago by Alex5723.
        3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2299023 Reply
        gborn
        AskWoody_MVP

        This really shouldn’t come as a surprise to anybody.

        As Woody mentioned – the update – during patchday, in a modest silent way would be ok. But not that marketing driven b******t, they are enrolling to consumer machines only.

        Side note: I remembered an episode from the 90s, when my employer did send through various management seminars. In one of these seminars we were coached by a psychologist on ‘How to motivate our employees properly’ (wasn’t bad and carried me for the last 30 years). His statement at that time about what you should never do: ‘Never act like some mothers who force their child to clean up their room and then expect or demand that the child does it with joy – that goes wrong and ends in a refusal attitude’. Why did this sentence suddenly came to my mind, when I read Woody’s story …

        Side note #2: Guess it’s time, that the European Commission (EC) re-invoke the Browser Choice in Windows. Obviously Microsoft never learned or forget the lesson from 2009 (expired 2014).

        Microsoft Windows Insider MVP, Microsoft Answers Community Moderator, Blogger, Book author

        https://www.borncity.com/win/

        4 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2299055 Reply
        agoldhammer
        AskWoody Plus

        My workstation updated to 2004 several weeks ago and Edge was put on the task bar by default along with Firefox which is what I routinely use.  I removed it from the task bar and have not had any issues at all.  I have been running Edge on my Win7 television PC that cannot be updated because Windows Media Center is not supported by MSFT any longer and I need this to watch cable TV.  It seems to work just fine for streaming videos outside of Windows Media Center which is all I use it for.  I haven’t peeked under the hood to see if the associated files are as huge in number as Firefox.

      • #2299080 Reply
        Noel Carboni
        AskWoody_MVP

        Web browsers… Everyone likes to relate their experience. This thread will no doubt get long.

        Like many, I have downloaded several alternatives. But let me talk about an Edge anecdote…

        Yesterday I found myself remoting into one of our corporate Windows 10 test systems to test a particular build, for which I have a link to a .zip file. The test system is not tweaked too much as the intent is to test in an environment much like one our customers might use.

        1. I fire up the browser that was on the machine – turns out to be Edge. It shows a hugely busy MSN page with all kinds of images and things moving around. Hmmm, I thought I had originally set these systems up with about:blank as the home page. I check… Sure enough, it says about:blank. Why is it showing the MSN page? Ah well, no matter, grumble about Microsoft and forge ahead…

        2. I paste in my build URL and hit Enter. Up pops a choice: Open, Save, or Cancel. I choose Open, as the first thing I want to do with the .zip file is extract the contents. Seems straightforward enough. The download completes and up pops Explorer showing my .zip file contents.

        3. Great, I think, that wasn’t too long to wait for a 2 GB file; I’ll just close Edge as I no longer need the browser. BOOM, Explorer disappears. I guess they figure if I want to Open it directly and easily, I must want Edge to delete it when I close the browser window. NOT!

        4. I open the browser and paste my URL AGAIN, and wait for the download AGAIN. This time I hit Save instead of Open, and when I close the browser the .zip file remains on the disk. Thank goodness! But I have to open Explorer myself then find the file and double-click it to get back to where I just was.

        5. (Not an Edge gripe, but an ongoing Microsoft gripe): Explorer takes a FULL 5 MINUTES to unzip the file. When it’s about 3 minutes into it I decide to open 7-Zip (conveniently already installed on the machine) and even with having to remember how to use 7-Zip I manage to unzip the file into a folder while there’s still over a minute of time remaining in Explorer’s run. I just close Explorer.

        6. When I go to run the software our team has just built it prompts me “Microsoft has protected your computer” dialog. Gee, thanks Defender, for not giving me enough credit to know what I want to run and what I don’t. I have to click through the More Information link (hm, certainly not where I’d expect to find further actions to do) and I find the Run Anyway function.

        Conclusion: Microsoft is not AT ALL about productivity. Roadblocks at EVERY turn! Protect me from myself at all costs! None of this Microsoft stuff works well together or even just works well. They’ve forgotten what a desktop is even for.

        Now I remember why I tweak my own personal systems SO heavily for productivity.

        -Noel

        9 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2299082 Reply
        Geo
        AskWoody Plus

        I had the same thing  happen even though I had  Firefox as my default browser.  I went back into default programs and  reset Firefox as my default browser and the edge pop up has not come back since.

      • #2299088 Reply
        JCCWsusser
        AskWoody Plus

        Didn’t the feds go after them once for this sort of thing?

        • #2299089 Reply
          PKCano
          Da Boss

          Yes, they got dinged for that same thing in the past.
          But now they are exempt from the laws and restrictions that cover the rest of the tech world because “they have already paid their due.” <cough, cough>

          2 users thanked author for this post.
          • #2299260 Reply
            Noel Carboni
            AskWoody_MVP

            It’s a great example of “normal” having been redefined!

            -Noel

            1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2299382 Reply
          anonymous
          Guest

          Everyone is behaving this way now (Facebook, Google), and in the unlikely event that governments go after Microsoft for doing this, that will be their (accepted) excuse. In corporate America no-one strives to raise the bar anymore, instead their objective is to sink just a little lower than their competitors. Remember when ISPs went whining to congress about how “Facebook and Google are allowed to monetize your web browsing history, so they should be allowed to do that too.”

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2299090 Reply
        Carl036
        AskWoody Plus

        I had exactly the same experience, except my experience was just a couple of days after doing a clean install/re-install of Windows 10 Pro.

        Even if I was inclined to use Edge (which I’m not), this experience would definitely make me avoid it. NO app should take over a machine for any reason, especially not hijacking the boot process to force a tutorial.

        Although I guess Microsoft has the right to force Edge to install, but I thought that Microsoft was forced years ago to separate Internet Explorer (Exploder) from Windows. So I wonder if the same still holds true for Edge/Chredge/Dreadge. I Dread the day that I’m forced to use Edge.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2299093 Reply
        Lars220
        AskWoody Lounger

        Here is some older news from July 2, 2020 that may be worth a re-read:

        With Edge, Microsoft’s forced Windows updates just sank to a new low

        “… I’m surprised Microsoft would shoot itself in the foot by stooping so low, using tactics I’ve only ever seen from purveyors of adware, spyware, and ransomware.”

        Yikes! Far from Welcome to the New Chredge, Resistance is Futile, you will be assimilated. With Windows 10, I think MS Owns us. Did I say Yikes?

        Chredge-Vacuum

        Attachments:
        3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2299100 Reply
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        I thought that Microsoft was forced years ago to separate Internet Explorer (Exploder) from Windows

        Microsoft was never forced to separate Internet Explorer from Windows. IE is still baked into Windows OS and can’t be removed. In EU Microsoft was forced to display a list of browsers for users to select from.
        According the the EULA you signed with Microsoft they can install, delete, change… any part of Windows which of course is Microsoft’s property.

        3 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2299399 Reply
          Michael Austin
          AskWoody Plus

          I use Edge only when I want quick toolbar searches in which I don’t mind being tracked by Microsoft. I use other browsers configured with a variety of little tweaks depending on the purpose for which I want them, including Brave and Firefox. I also happily use O&O’s Shutup10, which I found here on Ask Woody.

          Browsers and OS software from many publishers have become, and will likely continue to be a perpetual game of Whac-A-Mole. But there will usually be third-party publishers of utilities with acceptable workarounds. And that creates many kosher opportunities for full employment of reputable software techs who want to assist end users in regaining or protecting their own rights.

          Windows 10 has evolved not so quietly into an adware (even malware) delivery system as a thinly veiled cash cow. Microsoft tries whatever it thinks it can get away with. Our legal acquiesence over these destructive behaviours by giant software publishers acting as transnational, virtual corporate states bring to mind…

          Finance, social and tech founder. My planet-wide talk show for people craving new stories by which to live is Casual Saints.

      • #2299159 Reply
        EyesOnWindows
        AskWoody Lounger

        Here is some older news from July 2, 2020 that may be worth a re-read: With Edge, Microsoft’s forced Windows updates just sank to a new low

        A there’s a user comment there: “The Edge / Chromium update doesn’t remove the old version of Edge and also installs Office bloatware.”

        So I went looking and I came across this: PLEASE HELP ME GET RID OF THE NEW EDGE

        So apparently you can block from installing it by creating a registry entry by running this command line:

        REG ADD HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\EdgeUpdate /v DoNotUpdateToEdgeWithChromium /t REG_DWORD /d 1 /f

        Further on down there’s a link to this: How to uninstall Microsoft Edge Chromium

        Which says to do this:

        cd C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft\Edge\Application\84.0.522.52\Installer
        setup.exe –uninstall –system-level –verbose-logging –force-uninstall

        The 84.0.522.52 looks like a recent chrome version so it may change over time.

        I’m still running 1803 in my normal environment but I’ve put 2004 on my test and back up systems. Just had to do another Pause Updates for 35 days. It woke up from the last 35 day pause and for 6 days it respected the metered connection setting. When I do finally update I want to do what I did with those–a clean install keeping nothing from under C:\Users or C:\Program Files and reinstall current versions of of the programs I use. I would let WindowsUpdate install the 1803 updates beyond 2020-02 but it is bent on installing 1903 but I’m not interested in wasting my time on it.

        I did notice that the files under C:\Program Files\rempl\Logs were eating 40 MB tied to perfmon tied to KB4023057 so based on Update to Windows 10, versions 1507, 1511, 1607, 1703, 1709, 1803, 1809, 1903, and 1909 for update reliability

        I chose to remove it entirely (for x64-based systems):

        msiexec.exe /x {32DC821E-4A7D-4878-BEE8-337FA153D7F2}

        There’s was also an awful lot of noise after two years in the 165 MB of files shown by the event viewer so those all got cleared. I’ve been idly disabling those that grow back too quickly. I may just go a disable nearly all them. I wonder cynically whether this is a lot of the data Microsoft is collecting daily 🙂

        This is what I’m referring to:

        Code:
        DIR /O:D %SystemRoot%\System32\Winevt\Logs|findstr /v /c:"69,632"
        09/25/2020 03:07 PM 1,118,208 Microsoft-Windows-SMBServer%4Security.evtx
        09/26/2020 10:55 AM 1,118,208 Microsoft-Windows-Partition%4Diagnostic.evtx
        09/26/2020 10:56 AM 1,052,672 System.evtx
        09/26/2020 10:56 AM 1,052,672 Application.evtx
        09/26/2020 10:56 AM 1,052,672 Security.evtx
        09/26/2020 10:56 AM 1,052,672 Microsoft-Windows-Windows Defender%4Operational.evtx
        09/26/2020 11:06 AM 1,118,208 Microsoft-Windows-Storage-Storport%4Operational.evtx
        09/26/2020 11:53 AM 1,052,672 Microsoft-Windows-Provisioning-Diagnostics-Provider%4Admin.evtx
        09/26/2020 11:54 AM 1,052,672 Microsoft-Windows-WinRM%4Operational.evtx
        327 File(s) 31,813,632 bytes

        HP Compaq 6000 Pro SFF PC / Windows 10 Pro / 1803
        Intel®Core™2 “Wolfdale” E8400 3.0 GHz / 8.00 GB
        EyesOnWindows

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2299187 Reply
        Noel Carboni
        AskWoody_MVP

        I see no reason to think Chredge can be kept out long-term.

        W/regard to Marketing tactics, people worry over these messages, but just try disabling some of the services in the Services.msc list or any number of the other things Microsoft tries to protect from tampering by us. It can be done, but not through the snap-in, and it sometimes requires e.g., PsExec elevation to SYSTEM. It’s not a good trend, but it’s not going to stop.

        -Noel

        3 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2299195 Reply
          EyesOnWindows
          AskWoody Lounger

          To Microsoft we like the Lilliputians tying down Gulliver in Gulliver’s Travels by Jonathan Swift.

          but just try disabling some of the services in the Services.msc list

          Ah but there are some simple things one can do with remarkable results. Microsoft provides a method for experts to turn off the separate svchost.exe process use by each Windows service. See [Windows 10 Fix] Why Too Many Svchost.exe (Service Host) Process Running in Task Manager

          Basicly just set SvcHostSplitThresholdInKB under HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control to be equal or greater than your total RAM memory.

          On on my backup system running Windows 10 Pro version 2004 not connected to the WWW in task manager the Windows processes drops from 77 down to 37 after rebooting.

           

          HP Compaq 6000 Pro SFF PC / Windows 10 Pro / 1803
          Intel®Core™2 “Wolfdale” E8400 3.0 GHz / 8.00 GB
          EyesOnWindows

          2 users thanked author for this post.
          • #2299261 Reply
            Noel Carboni
            AskWoody_MVP

            Yeah, that SvcHost split-up accounts for only 30 to 60 more processes.

            My reasonably tight fully net-connected and application-outfitted Win 10 system idles on 120 to 130 processes, where my similarly tweaked Win 8.1 system quietly supports an empty desktop on about 40 processes. That’s still about 20 to 50+ more processes of utter bloat. Brokers and notifiers and hosts… Things that have names that imply they don’t have a solid function nor do much work.

            But the SvcHost process split-up has done its job brilliantly for Microsoft marketing – anyone complaining about the additional bloat is immediately dismissed as not knowing about the split-up.

            Oh, and not actively keep on top of things for a couple of days of real use (including Office, development tools, networking apps) and 130 processes just becomes 160 processes just hanging around. It seems Microsoft encourages developers (including their own) just to “leave stuff running” – a COMPLETE waste of resources in this era where SSDs and flash storage deliver their data in a millisecond.

            -Noel

            4 users thanked author for this post.
            • #2299263 Reply
              Noel Carboni
              AskWoody_MVP

              I tend to go on a bit about this because it really bothers me that Microsoft has chosen to waste the computer resources I’ve purchased. The underlying kernel is for lack of a better term “timelessly beautiful”. No better virtual memory system has been invented yet.

              There is no reason it has to be hobbled with bloat and dumbed down. We’ve already seen it run better, and while people may want to play with devices, people NEED to WORK with Windows. I don’t mind if flavors of it are provided that suit devices, but there has to be maintained Professional editions for people who create software. I’m seriously concerned that Microsoft has lost sight of this. Yes, there have been some developer-oriented moves – e.g., to make it more Unix-like. That’s the LAST thing it needs. It was already better than Unix.

              -Noel

              5 users thanked author for this post.
            • #2299585 Reply
              Elrod
              AskWoody Plus

              I’ve noticed an interesting tendency on my work laptop, which runs Win10 and Office 2016.

              One day, Word was acting rather flaky.  It seemed that it was forgetting where I was in the document, hanging, etc.  Went into Process Explorer and there were three instances of WINWORD.EXE resident in memory.  Only one was open on the taskbar.  So I exited Word on the taskbar, and killed the remaining WINWORD processes.  When I go back into Word, the flaky behavior is gone.

              Next day, I’ve been working in Word for several hours, and I think hmmmm… I close Word, go back into Process Explorer, and sure enough, there are two instances of WINWORD resident in memory.  Word is not even running on the taskbar.  Apparently WINWORD just hangs around in memory now for some reason.  I haven’t noticed whether it is starting up an extra instance when you double-click on a Word file vs. opening the file from inside Word, or what the issue is.  Since I don’t work for Microsoft…sorry, since I don’t get paid for working for Microsoft, I am in no rush to debug this issue for them.

              Group "L": Linux Mint

              • #2299597 Reply
                WCHS
                AskWoody Plus

                Apparently WINWORD just hangs around in memory now for some reason.

                I had a similar problem in Word 2016 in July with WINWORD hanging around. See #2281538

                It seems it was a problem with a Word 2016 update in July which made Word 2016 open up automatically every time I logged in to my laptop — because the process had not ended in my last use of Word 2016, even after I had closed it and and had powered down.

                But, killing the process in the Task Manager fixed it and the problem has not occurred again.

                Offline: Win7Pro ∙ SP1 ∙ x64
                Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-6500U ∙ RAM 12GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender
                Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-8565U ∙ RAM 16GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender

        • #2299403 Reply
          Michael Austin
          AskWoody Plus

          Instead of me doing this myself, it makes me think about paying someone to do it for me, either tuning the Services every so often, or using software written by someone to do it for me.

          Finance, social and tech founder. My planet-wide talk show for people craving new stories by which to live is Casual Saints.

      • #2299282 Reply
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        My reasonably tight fully net-connected and application-outfitted Win 10 system idles on 120 to 130 processes, where my similarly tweaked Win 8.1 system quietly supports an empty desktop on about 40 processes. That’s still about 20 to 50+ more processes of utter bloat.

        Black Viper’s Windows 10 Service Configurations

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2299320 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        To avoid using Windows Update for the “upgrade” to Chredge, isn’t there a stand-alone installer available from the MS catalog site? I’ve found a stand-alone installer, but it’s labeled on MS’s own site as Edge for Business/Enterprise (the download file’s name says that it’s for enterprise). What about the small business crowd/individual user? They deserve a stand-alone installer as well, but I haven’t been able to find it yet.

        • #2299326 Reply
          PKCano
          Da Boss
          • #2299337 Reply
            WCHS
            AskWoody Plus

            https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/edge

            I get this screen. What application is it looking for??

            Which-application-to-launch-installation-of-MS-Edge

            Offline: Win7Pro ∙ SP1 ∙ x64
            Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-6500U ∙ RAM 12GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender
            Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-8565U ∙ RAM 16GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender

            Attachments:
          • #2299340 Reply
            PKCano
            Da Boss

            That link is not Windows Update.

            • #2299345 Reply
              WCHS
              AskWoody Plus

              Is the link https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/edge a link to a stand-alone installer for Edge for small business crowd/individual user (in answer to #2299337)?

              When I go to https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/edge, this is the screen that comes up:
              Screen-that-come-up-with-the-link

              Then when I click on the “Try now” link, I get
              Which-application-to-launch-installation-of-MS-Edge-1

              Offline: Win7Pro ∙ SP1 ∙ x64
              Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-6500U ∙ RAM 12GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender
              Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-8565U ∙ RAM 16GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender

              Attachments:
              • #2299349 Reply
                PKCano
                Da Boss

                That is the link to download the standalone Edge.
                Open it in whatever browser you use and download the installer.

          • #2299331 Reply
            anonymous
            Guest

            All that page tries to do is to launch Edge to d/l Chredge. Won’t that trigger the WU mechanism for installation, making it impossible to uninstall the older version of Edge and impossible to use IE if I need to for sites that won’t render properly in Chredge?

            I’ve used the Chredge blocker toolkit to avoid just that situation…having Chredge forced down my throat via the WU mechanism.

      • #2299358 Reply
        WCHS
        AskWoody Plus

        That is the link to download the standalone Edge.
        Open it in whatever browser you use and download the installer.

        It won’t work in my Firefox browser. I get the screens shown in #229345

        Offline: Win7Pro ∙ SP1 ∙ x64
        Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-6500U ∙ RAM 12GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender
        Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-8565U ∙ RAM 16GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender

        • #2299360 Reply
          Bob99
          AskWoody Plus

          It didn’t work in my copy of FF 81.0 either. I had to copy the URL and post it inside my current version of Edge in order for it to work. That then produced a download prompt for a small executable that’s about 1.7 megs in size.

          Once you download that, double clicking on it will then allow it to run and upgrade you to the latest version of Edge. However, it will require you to have an active internet connection, as it will need to download several additional files from MS in order to properly install the latest version of Edge on your computer.

          What I don’t know is if using this executable program will produce the same results documented by Woody in his blog post, or if it will respect any current settings with regards to a default browser that you may currently have that isn’t from Microsoft, such as FF, Waterfox, Opera, Safari, etc.

          Anyone else have any personal experience using this little stub installer to upgrade their current version of Edge to Chredge?

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2299437 Reply
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus
      • #2300003 Reply
        rje81849
        AskWoody Plus

        We all have our preferences, but using the new Chrome Edge has been a pleasant surprise. It works much better than Google Chrome for ad blocking. The setting that makes the big difference is the “Privacy” setting for Tracking prevention. Change “Balanced” to “Strict” and it will block all annoying ads. Nothing else, no add-on apps, needed. It makes internet browsing a LOT more tolerable!

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