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  • Deleting Resistant Windows 10 Registry Entries

    Posted on Michael Austin Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Home Forums AskWoody support Windows Windows 10 Questions: Win10 Deleting Resistant Windows 10 Registry Entries

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      • #2284407 Reply
        Michael Austin
        AskWoody Plus

        What I’d like now is to know how to rip the pernicious weeds of Apple’s Mobile Device registry entries out by their roots.  The screenshot of NirSoft’s RegScanner is showing me this below. I need to know how to overcome this and delete them.

        I’d get the same results using Windows’ RegEdit. Because Apple tech support is suggesting that installing version 2004 of Windows 10 might make their “Apple Mobile Device USB Device” drivers work, I’d instead much rather edit Windows Registry and start over with a fresh installation of Apple’s software.

        I ran Revo’s uninstaller before this screen of NirSoft’s RegScanner and removed everything Apple. Is there some secret, wizardly chant I must perform to nuke these weeds? Thank you.

         

        NirSoft RegCleaner attempted delete screen

         

        Finance, social and tech founder. My new, planet-wide talk show, Casual Saints, is happening.

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      • #2284411 Reply
        RetiredGeek
        AskWoody MVP

        Michael,

        You can run ProcessHacker as Trusted Installer to solve this. I learned this from @bbearren.

        ProcessHacker-as-Trusted-Installer
        You’ll need the TrustedInstallerPlugin.dll but if I remember correctly it comes with the download.

        HTH 😎

        May the Forces of good computing be with you!

        RG

        PowerShell & VBA Rule!
        Computer Specs

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        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2284434 Reply
          Michael Austin
          AskWoody Plus

          Although I’ve never used Process Explorer 2 until just now, I don’t see any indication it can be used to edit the Registry. And the “Run as Trusted Installer” plug-in isn’t in the version 2 which I downloaded.

          Finance, social and tech founder. My new, planet-wide talk show, Casual Saints, is happening.

          • #2284437 Reply
            joep517
            AskWoody MVP

            RG said Process HACKER not Process Explorer. See the link in his post.

            NOTE: you need to download the TrustedInstaller plugin from the ProcessHacker forums

            --Joe

            • This reply was modified 1 week, 2 days ago by joep517. Reason: added note
            • #2284442 Reply
              Michael Austin
              AskWoody Plus

              Yeah I installed the right thing and wrote the wrong thing. There’s still no indication to me that Process Hacker can edit the Registry. I’ll look at the forums.

              Finance, social and tech founder. My new, planet-wide talk show, Casual Saints, is happening.

              • #2284455 Reply
                bbearren
                AskWoody MVP

                Before you do anything else, create a fresh drive image and store it safely out of harm’s way.

                Then, after you have downloaded the plugins, and put them in the Process Hacker folder, open Process Hacker using Run as administrator, click Hacker in the upper left, select Run as trusted installer in the dropdown.

                A Run As Trusted Installer dialog box will open, and you can type “regedit” (without the quotes) and click on OK.

                Regedit will open using Trusted Installer privileges.  Do be careful, this is a quite powerful combination.

                Create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates, in case you need to start over!
                "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns
                "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

                1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2284461 Reply
        Michael Austin
        AskWoody Plus

        Perfect. Thank you. I do an automatic nightly drive image. And before I edit the Registry I create a restore point. I came from the old days of Windows 3.x through every version including 7 and now 10, and I’ve been used to deleting Registry keys when everything else failed. In a different, but related topic thread I recounted that –

        “I’m having gradual success with the Registry hacking process. I’ve run NirSoft’s RegScanner, searching for “Apple Mobile”. When I started it found 107 keys. I’ve found and deleted several of those keys, and also nuked some Apple .infs, and I’m down to around 90 keys. The phone now backs up and syncs via iTunes.”

        – so Revo Uninstaller, followed by Registry deletions, followed by clean software re-installations of Apple’s software are what started to solve the problem.

        Finance, social and tech founder. My new, planet-wide talk show, Casual Saints, is happening.

      • #2284497 Reply
        Rick Corbett
        AskWoody_MVP

        Another thing to consider is using O&O’s free RegEditor (perhaps run as Trusted Installer) instead of Windows’ built-in Registry Editor.

        I like that it’s portable, has a LOT more features, understands XML and that I can carry around a list of the many ‘Favourite’ registry locations that I tend to visit time after time.

        Just remember that even though you can… sometimes you need to resist the temptation to elevate all the time and think carefully about each situation as it arises rather than just always reaching for TI… just ‘cos it works.

        IMO the Windows’ security model is well-thought out… just don’t blast through it without thinking.

        Hope this helps…

        (PS – On my own devices I *always* replace Windows’ built-in Task Manager with Process Hacker as a default task manager. Always…)

      • #2284547 Reply
        Michael Austin
        AskWoody Plus

        Just remember that even though you can… sometimes you need to resist the temptation to elevate all the time and think carefully about each situation as it arises rather than just always reaching for TI… just ‘cos it works. IMO the Windows’ security model is well-thought out… just don’t blast through it without thinking.

        Very helpful, Rick. Thank you! My Registry skills are mainly in removing things (aka ripping them out vigorously) rather than editing them because I won’t surrender to the labyrinthine patience needed to edit them.  If you think back the scene in the movie, Groundhog Day, when Bill Murray’s accelerating towards the cliff in the pickup… if Microsoft were Bill Murray I’d be the groundhog in his lap who took the wheel. Murray’s character says, “Don’t drive angry” to the groundhog.

        Finance, social and tech founder. My new, planet-wide talk show, Casual Saints, is happening.

      • #2284549 Reply
        EP
        AskWoody_MVP

        I simply use Sordum’s PowerRun tool and launch RegEdit with SYSTEM/TrustedInstaller privileges and I can delete certain “resistant” reg entries

        • This reply was modified 1 week, 1 day ago by EP.
        1 user thanked author for this post.
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