News, tips, advice, support for Windows, Office, PCs & more. Tech help. No bull. We're community supported by donations from our Plus Members, and proud of it
Home icon Home icon Home icon Email icon RSS icon
  • Dell Refurbished Laptop for Linux Mint

    Posted on LHiggins Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Home Forums AskWoody support Other platforms – for Windows wonks Linux for Windows wonks Dell Refurbished Laptop for Linux Mint

    This topic contains 15 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by  anonymous 5 days, 3 hours ago.

    • Author
      Posts
    • #1148387 Reply

      LHiggins
      AskWoody Plus

      Hello!

      I occasionally look at the refurbished laptops Dell offers afor a possible Linux laptop, and came upon this one:

      https://www.dellrefurbished.com/laptops/dell-latitude-14-5000-series-e5440-no-operating-system-206062.html?

      It is a Dell Latitude 14″ E5440 with no operating system for $179. Its specs are:

      • Processor: Intel Core i7 (i7-4600U) 2.10 GHz
      • Memory: 8 GB
      • Hard Drive: 500 GB
      • Display: 14″ HD+ (1600 x 900)
      • Cosmetic Grade: A
      • OS: No Operating System

      Does that mean that I could install Mint 19.1 on it and run Mint exclusively? I’m guessing having no operating system would allow it to accept whatever is installed on it.

      What is your opinion on that laptop? Would it be a good candidate for Mint?

      There is also a similar one for $229 that has Win 8.1 – would it be better as a dual boot, or would just having Mint be preferable.

      I am using Mint now on my Win 7 laptop with a full install on a USB and have really been loving it – fast and I can access my Win 7 files if I need to.

      Just thought I’d get some opinions on what might be  a next step!

      Thanks!

       

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1151435 Reply

      Berton
      AskWoody_MVP

      What I do, and just have done on a Dell Inspiron 11 3000 2-in-1 Table, is to boot either the LiveDVD or a Bootable USB drive to see what works.  Usually everything does but I did have one Dell with the Centrino feature that would run only Linux Mint 13.

      My little one will work just fine and Linux Mint will the be next step if the ‘rumored’ feature of not having USB drives or SDHC cards attached becomes true as it needs additional storage for the undating as it has only a 32GB SSD, actually about 10% less with formatting.  And the drive can’t be replaced to get a 64GB drive in it.  This way I can possibly get another 4 years out of it.

      Before you wonder "Am I doing things right," ask "Am I doing the right things?"
      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #1152055 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Berton, I have a similar machine (ca. 2011) in terms of CPU type and speed, RAM size and HD capacity, and have installed Linux Mint in dual-boot with the pre-existing Windows 7 it came with. Windows 7 still have 2/3 of the disk to itself and Linux, the rest. No problems, so far.

      Edited afterwards, to add the following: And all the peripherals work just fine (all-in-one printer, thumb drives, external Hard Disks, internal optical drive, WiFi connections, including to the Internet router, HDMI connection to an external monitor).

      If you planned to install Linux as the sole operating system, with the entire big HD free to use, then this machine should be more than sufficient for that, in principle. The main question I would have at the back of my mind would be: in what condition is this machine, really? If you find the answer to this question and are satisfied enough with this answer, then I see no reason why you should not go ahead, buy it, and install Linux Mint on it. Good luck!

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1153708 Reply

      Ascaris
      AskWoody_MVP

      What is your opinion on that laptop? Would it be a good candidate for Mint?

      Probably.  I’ve yet to have any serious issues with things not working in Linux… my Swift has a fingerprint reader that doesn’t work in Linux, as the maker of the reader (as usual) declined to offer a Linux driver, and the open source driver doesn’t recognize it yet. Otherwise, everything’s worked in Linux on the machines I’ve put it on.  Still, since beginning with Linux as a main OS, I’ve always bought my PCs (laptops all) from a place that has a liberal return policy, should I find Linux not to work properly.

      Generally, being a slightly older model, it is probably more likely to work with Linux properly than newer ones might be.  It can take some time before the open-source drivers catch up with the newer releases of various things.  Dell’s generally pretty good with Linux, as they offer it as an option on some of their models, but you never know unless you can find a reference (someone who tried it).

      It’s a good price for a still-powerful PC (the difference between Haswell and current generation models is not huge!), so I’d probably be willing to try it if I were in the market for a new laptop, even with a not so liberal return policy.  Even more so if the display was IPS, but it probably isn’t at that price point.

      [There is also a similar one for $229 that has Win 8.1 – would it be better as a dual boot, or would just having Mint be preferable.[/quote]

      It depends on what you want.  A year ago I would have gone for the Win 8.1 machine (it’s the last version of Windows I installed on my own machines… my two laptops that have 10 on them came that way, and are now primarily Linux machines with the Windows 10 pushed into a tiny little partition in the corner), but now I’d go for the cheaper one with no OS.  A person who wants to put their own OS on and a PC that comes with no OS… it’s just too perfect!  I’ve become so disgusted by Microsoft that I now have an aversion to all versions of Windows, not just Windows 10.  But that’s me… what’s best for you is not necessarily the same!

      Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.16.4).

      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #1154248 Reply

      DrBonzo
      AskWoody Lounger

      A couple months ago I bought a Dell refurbished Latitude E5450 with 4GB memory, 256 GB SSD and i5-5000u with Win 8.1 on it for $279. While I can’t speak for what it will do with any version of Linux, I can say that with Windows 8.1 it’s a delightful little laptop. Very fast boot and shutdown times, and downloading and installing updates goes very quickly. Very nice display (14 inch HD), too. And as a bonus, at least for this particular computer, the cosmetic grade of A meant that it looks almost brand new; I have to look pretty hard to see the tell-tale shininess on the touchpad that comes from wear. Oh, and none of the usual Dell Bloatware/junkware that often comes with a new Dell – just Windows 8.1 and that’s it.

      My personal opinion is to get one with 8.1 on it just in case you can’t get Linux running. That way you’d have 3 more years of Windows support ( a mixed blessing for sure, but it is a Windows world out there).

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #1171303 Reply

      johnf
      AskWoody Lounger
    • #1171355 Reply

      johnf
      AskWoody Lounger

      This link from Dell on how to install Ubuntu on a Dell Laptop should be useful as well.

      https://www.dell.com/support/article/us/en/19/sln151664/how-to-install-ubuntu-linux-on-your-dell-pc?lang=en

       

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1171797 Reply

      Berton
      AskWoody_MVP

      Berton, I have a similar machine (ca. 2011) in terms of CPU type and speed, RAM size and HD capacity, and have installed Linux Mint in dual-boot with the pre-existing Windows 7 it came with. Windows 7 still have 2/3 of the disk to itself and Linux, the rest. No problems, so far.

      Edited afterwards, to add the following: And all the peripherals work just fine (all-in-one printer, thumb drives, external Hard Disks, internal optical drive, WiFi connections, including to the Internet router, HDMI connection to an external monitor).

      If you planned to install Linux as the sole operating system, with the entire big HD free to use, then this machine should be more than sufficient for that, in principle. The main question I would have at the back of my mind would be: in what condition is this machine, really? If you find the answer to this question and are satisfied enough with this answer, then I see no reason why you should not go ahead, buy it, and install Linux Mint on it. Good luck!

      I have Linux Mint on an HP Notebook with a 120GB SSD, does just fine.  Any larger storage I need gets files transferred to my NAS drive.

      Before you wonder "Am I doing things right," ask "Am I doing the right things?"
      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #1172805 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Hmmm… I had actually meant to write “LHiggins”. Somehow, it come out as “Berton.”

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1171904 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      I have a pretty basic question: where does one go to get good rebuilt computers?

      Ideally, I would like it to be a regular bricks-and-mortar shop where one can take the machine back to have it fixed o else get the money back, if it does not work properly “out of the box.”

      I could use getting a rebuilt one in good shape, to keep going when my old ca. 2011 Windows 7 and Linux Mint laptop finally quits for good. I would install Linux on the rebuilt one, by itself if the PC comes with Windows 10 pre-installed, or in dual-boot if it comes with 7 or 8.1. Thanks.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1173276 Reply

      Berton
      AskWoody_MVP

      The need for used machines is best served by some of the online companies such as Amazon, TigerDirect, NewEgg, etc.  Maybe BestBuy.  The thing is they get machines out of companies that lease them then return to the leasing company when that contract expires.  Some will be nearly undistinguishable from new machines, I’ve gotten some that way and got one on the way now.  Some of the prices will be 50% of new or less.  The main thing is to assure there is some warranty, at least 90 days or better deals will have the 1 year.  I’ve had only 1 issue in that out of 3 Thinkpads only 1 had a cracked screen, returned it and got credit.

      The issue with local dealers is the amount of resources [money] they can tie up until getting a sale.  They may do the same with “special orders” using the same way with online.

      Before you wonder "Am I doing things right," ask "Am I doing the right things?"
      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #1174942 Reply

      LHiggins
      AskWoody Plus

      Thanks for all of the input and ideas! By this morning, the deal for the Dell laptop without an OS was gone – at $179 it is not surprising!

      I appreciate all of your ideas. I have been toying with the idea of just having a strictly Mint laptop now that I am getting used to it! If I do eventually decide to go this route, I am glad to hear that a refurbished off-lease machine is OK – and will look into the sources mentioned.

      Thanks again!

      LH

    • #1907608 Reply

      Dimwit
      AskWoody Lounger

      Speaking of refurbished laptops, can someone suggest a few good and reliable sites to purchase these? Is Newegg a good option? I’ve never purchased a used machine before and am wary! I am looking for a 2-3 year old model with Window 10 Pro. No gaming or high resource use activities. Great fan of Shadow Defender so I hope 10 plays nice with this invaluable program.

      By the way, I love Windows 7 but time goes on…

      Thanks for the replies. Phil

      • #1907627 Reply

        MrJimPhelps
        AskWoody_MVP

        Walmart.com is a good site for buying refurbished computers. The reason I recommend them is because if you buy a bad computer, you can take it back to your local Walmart for a refund.

        Make sure that “Walmart” is listed as the vendor when you buy a computer from Walmart.com. If someone else is the vendor, you won’t be able to get your money back at Walmart.

        Officedepot.com also sells refurbished computers. I don’t know if you can bring a bad computer back to your local Office Depot.

        Group "L" (Linux Mint)
        with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1907634 Reply

      anonymous

      Good suggestion. Thanks

    • #1911511 Reply

      anonymous

      In my community there are companies that refurbish computers. I recently bought a Dell E6440 without hard drive or OS for about $100. I could have had a drive for a little more. It came with a warranty sufficient to do thorough testing.

      I am happily running a Linux OS, with 7 also available. Dell still allows one to download 7 from their support pages for products that came with 7 originally.

      Dan

    Please follow the -Lounge Rules- no personal attacks, no swearing, and politics/religion are relegated to the Rants forum.

    Reply To: Dell Refurbished Laptop for Linux Mint

    You can use BBCodes to format your content.
    Your account can't use Advanced BBCodes, they will be stripped before saving.

    Cancel