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  • Details emerging on the March 2019 Patch Tuesday trove

    Home Forums AskWoody blog Details emerging on the March 2019 Patch Tuesday trove

    This topic contains 41 replies, has 17 voices, and was last updated by

     PKCano 1 week, 2 days ago.

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    • #341090 Reply

      woody
      Da Boss

      By and large this month’s patches — so far — aren’t much to be concerned about, unless you’re worried about attacks from nation states. Chrome has a
      [See the full post at: Details emerging on the March 2019 Patch Tuesday trove]

      4 users thanked author for this post.
    • #341163 Reply

      abbodi86
      AskWoody_MVP

      I actually did not had Win7 machine to check 🙂

      i was talking based on analyzing KB4490628 msu/cab file and update.mum precisely, it does not have any “exclusive” attribute like KB3177467

      so it can be integrated offline normally (tested that)
      it also should be show on WU normally with other updates, unless they manipulated the metadata

      i will check that soon

      Finished checking 😀
      KB4490628 has property InstallationBehavior.Impact : 2 (all other updates has it at 0)

      https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/openspecs/windows_protocols/ms-wsusar/b4630c5e-a336-40e1-a338-88739a8f2e2a
      2 = RequiresExclusiveHandling

      “Specifies that installing or uninstalling the update has such a high impact to the system that it is required to be installed “exclusively”. This means the update MUST be installed/uninstalled without combining it with other updates.”

      so KB4490628 is still metadata-exclusive, just like KB3177467

      if i understand this right, when Windows Update is set to automatic, it will download KB4490628 together with other updates, then install it exclusively

      in our case where we only check updates, KB4490628 will not show up untill all other updates queue is clear

      p.s. you can use WindowsUpdate MiniTool with “Include superseded” checked, and KB4490628 will show up in this case, you may install it alone yourself through the tool 🙂
      but it’s best to install it from msu file downloaded from MU catalog

      7 users thanked author for this post.
      • #341166 Reply

        PKCano
        Da Boss

        Think I figured that out before you this time 🙂 LOL

        3 users thanked author for this post.
        • #341167 Reply

          woody
          Da Boss

          Glad to know it’s working properly!

      • #341182 Reply

        CADesertRat
        AskWoody Plus

        So if I understand this correctly (W7 Grp A), it would be wise to download/install the SSU KB 4490628 from the catalog now, before we go to Defcon 4??

        Don't take yourself so seriously, no one else does 🙂
        Grp. A with 2 Win 7 Pro, also 2 Win 10 Pro currently 1803 (1 Desktop, 1 Laptop).

      • #341205 Reply

        anonymous

        ? says:

        abbodi86, how are you analyzing the contents of the KB’s?

        • #341437 Reply

          abbodi86
          AskWoody_MVP

          7-zip & Notepad3

          it’s all in .mum files

          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #341443 Reply

            anonymous

            ? says:

            Thank you, abbodi86. when i saw “igor pavlov,” in hklm\software years ago I freaked out and deleted it.

            I use the built in linux archive manager to peer inside the patches for files I know I don’t want, time consuming looking through the bundled updates…

            • #341654 Reply

              rc primak
              AskWoody_MVP

              igor pavlov is the author of 7-Zip. That might be the Registration Entry for that program.

              -- rc primak

          • #341469 Reply

            ch100
            AskWoody_MVP

            Notepad3? At first I thought it was a typo of the Notepad++ which almost every power user uses.
            After that, I did a Google search and found that there is such thing as Notepad3 🙂
            Thank you for the info.

            • #341489 Reply

              abbodi86
              AskWoody_MVP

              I use Notepad++ as portable app, but Notepad3 is my main notepad 😀

              and i use AkelPad for large files

              1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #341174 Reply

      EP
      AskWoody_MVP

      woody

      regarding the KB4489899 security update for Windows 10 version 1809 and audio issues – read this recent Softpedia news article by Bogdan:

      https://news.softpedia.com/news/how-to-fix-audio-issues-caused-by-windows-10-cumulative-update-kb4489899-525287.shtml

      the problem only affects audio devices with multiple audio outputs available. If only one output is available (ex. Speakers only), then KB4489899 may be safe to install.

      • This reply was modified 1 week, 5 days ago by
         EP.
      • This reply was modified 1 week, 5 days ago by
         EP.
      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #341250 Reply

      anonymous

      Regarding the Servicing Stack Update (SSU) for Win7, Woody’s Computerworld article mentions the following…

      “As @drbonzo explains, and @pkcano reiterates, if you’re manually installing Win7 patches, you need the Servicing Stack Update KB 4490628 before you install this month’s patches. (If you let Windows Update install the patches, it’ll get installed first.) Then the Windows-only fix KB 4474419 can follow along any time before July.”

      Absolutely not true. While KB4490628 does get installed first via Windows Update, its installation absolutely is NOT required before installing any and all 2019 updates through March 12, 2019. I have verified this.

      “If you’re installing the Win7 updates manually, there’s a specific installation sequence detailed by @pkcano that ensures the updates go in the correct order.”

      Not necessary. It is NOT REQUIRED to install the new March 2019 Servicing Stack KB4490628 for Win7 update first, before installing any of the 2019 Win7 updates through March 11, 2019. In fact, I recommend that the new SSU KB4490628 should be the LAST update to be installed by Group B users, and that KB4490628 should be separately installed (no other updates were also installed) before rebooting.

      • #341312 Reply

        DrBonzo
        AskWoody Lounger

        @anonymous (#341250) – The MS support pages for the Win 7 March Rollup and Security Only strongly recommends installing the latest SSU before installing either update. Whether or not it is absolutely necessary to install the latest SSU, may be open for debate, but the strong recommendation of MS is to do it. In the end, of course, all of us can make our own decision as to the proper course of action. If your method worked for you, great.

        3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #341337 Reply

        anonymous

        I would like to add for my anonymous colleague, that while words like must and absolute suggest there is only one path to the exclusion of all others, there may be another reason for writing “need to” do. That being consistency.

        This blog and lounge follows Woody’s long beaten path to keep things simple, like for a dummy. So presenting the same instructions every time a SSU is offered follows a long tradition. As you have painstakingly verified that installation works in either case, there is no hazard to stay the course laid out from previous occasions.

        What would disrupt this method would be a discovery where Microsoft has changed the rules and broken a previously good method. Here you have only shown that more than one path is possible. Along those lines I would add that Group A is another alternative. Remember those directions also ask you to continue installing (or hide and install) until the Important tab is cleared. Step A5: Wash, rinse, repeat.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #341813 Reply

        GoneToPlaid
        AskWoody Plus

        Hi everyone. This post was mine. Once again, I forgot to log in.

        I am Win7 Group B. I was updated through December 2018. Yesterday, I installed the Win7 Security Only updates in the order shown in the yellow block within the attached image. Needless to say, I first performed an incremental backup of my OS hard drive.

        In the attached image, you can see that I altered each downloaded update’s file name in order to number each update’s installation order, in order to also indicate when the update was made available, and sometimes in order to indicate additional information about the update. I developed this methodology long ago so that I can perform fresh installs and then install updates in specific sequences in order to take advantage of supersedence in order to get around issues in earlier updates. You know, stuff like MS erroneously blocking Windows Update for certain CPUs, or getting around Microsoft’s internally created Total Meltdown vulnerability which wasn’t discovered for three months! The last is damning in terms of Microsoft relying on whatever they call their internal “intelligent machine” testing.

        All “Reboot.txt” files are merely placeholders which indicate when I decided that a reboot was necessary. Otherwise, updates are installed one after the other in the indicated sequence and without rebooting, until you see a listed “Reboot.txt” file.

        The upshot is that for Win7 Group B users only, updating the Win7 OS through March 2019 has not caused me to see any issues. You will note that I installed the SHA-2 and WU Servicing Stack updates last, individually and with reboots after each of these specific update installations.

        So far, everything is rock stable and with no issues.

        I haven’t updated IE11 or .NET in a while. I am curious to hear recommendations about what dates I should update both of these to.

        Best regards,

        –GTP

        Security_Only_rev1

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        • #341818 Reply

          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          Until now, I have been saving the monthly Group B updates in a folder called “Windows Updates” with subfolders  within, each named “windows.update.month.year” and where, together with the .msu files of the Group B security only and IE11 cumulative updates for the month, plus the occasional thing such as an SSU or some executable file to be run together with some update,  I also have saved a text file with an explanation of the updating details for the month, such as the order of installation and the KB numbers of updates for Office, .Net, etc., installed separately with Windows Update.

          From now on, sadly, I won’t be doing that anymore, as I have been “promoted” by the dark chthonic gods of the operating systems’ underworld, that have zapped Windows 7 in my laptop (but every software and hardware test I can think of has come back since with glowing reports that everything is really, totally, good), to Group L, or more properly Group L&M, as I also have a Mac. Cheerio, Group B friends!

    • #341346 Reply

      Nibbled To Death By Ducks
      AskWoody Lounger

      NTDBD reporting in with a piece of info- The “Windows Malicious Software Removal Tool” takes forever, we all know, but this one was a record: 20 minutes of thrashing to install. That’s almost twice the record time for this on this machine for that monthly patch/routine. (Windows Malicious Software Removal Tool x64 – March 2019 (KB890830)

      I thought, “Well, I’ll hold off on everything else until Defcon 3 or lower, or Susan gives the go-ahead…surely THIS one won’t cause any shipped heartbeats…”

      Wrong again, chucko! Back in the foxhole! Mea Maxima Culpa!

      Win7 Pro SP1 64-bit, Dell Latitude E6330, Intel CORE i5 "Ivy Bridge", Group "A/B [negative] :)", Multiple Air-Gapped backup drives in different locations, "Don't check for updates-Full Manual Mode."
      --
      "The more kinks you put in the plumbing, the easier it is to stop up the pipes!" -Scotty

      • #341360 Reply

        anonymous

        I ALWAYS hide MSRT, relying instead on malwarebytes, superantispyware plus Systinternals utilities that have check against VirusTotal as options.

        • #341420 Reply

          bsfinkel
          AskWoody Lounger

          I always install MSRT (MRT.exe) when I see it each month.  It does a scan of the C-drive (that takes some time), and it has never reported any problem.  One annoyance – Windows Update does not tell me when it starts MRT.exe; the status in the WU window still says “creating restore point”.  I look at the Task Manager to see when MRT.exe starts.  Once I ran MRT.exe manually, as for some reason it did not run to completion when I installed the monthly patch.  It reported problems when run manually, and someone on some MS forum replied to my posting that I should not worry about the output of a manual run of MRT.exe.  I see no harm in running MRT.exe automatically once a month – unless one does not have the time to wait for its completion.

          3 users thanked author for this post.
          • #341438 Reply

            anonymous

            Zero results indicates questionable benefit in comparison to other alternatives. I take the view that Microsoft covers a diverse range of products and may not be as effective as a specialist. However you are correct. There is no harm running it…

            so far😉

            • #341453 Reply

              anonymous

              Zero results indicates questionable benefit in comparison to other alternatives.

              In your experience, on your hardware, do your other alternatives give frequent results that indicate to you more benefit? How are these threats getting past your live protection in order to reside on your hardware long enough to be found by the one off scan? This would cause me great concern.

              I think you make an assertion that cannot be proven in all cases. MSRT appears to draw its definitions package from the same source as Win10’s Defender. But that product may also fail to meet your standard.

            • #341482 Reply

              Alex5723
              AskWoody Plus

              MSRT and Defender are the worse ever anti-virus/malware.. software written in the history of computers.

              • This reply was modified 1 week, 5 days ago by
                 Alex5723.
            • #341667 Reply

              b
              AskWoody Plus

              In AV-TEST’s November-December 2018 testing cycle, Windows Defender Antivirus achieved a perfect score (6.0/6.0) in the Protection test. This is the fourth consecutive cycle that Windows Defender Antivirus achieved a perfect score.
              Examining the AV-TEST November-December 2018 results

              Cannon fodder Chump Daft glutton Idiot Sucker More intrepid Crazy/ignorant Toxic drinker "Saluted blockhead" (Group ASAP)

      • #341500 Reply

        anonymous

        We block this garbage on all servers with

        HKLM – SOFTWARE – Policies – Microsoft – MRT – DontOfferThroughWUAU (DWORD = 1)

        Never found anything useful, wastes large amounts of time, plus – worse yet – wiped our business critical custom-written application multiple times.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #341431 Reply

      Nibbled To Death By Ducks
      AskWoody Lounger

      I always install MSRT (MRT.exe) when I see it each month.  It does a scan of the C-drive (that takes some time), and it has never reported any problem.  One annoyance – Windows Update does not tell me when it starts MRT.exe; the status in the WU window still says “creating restore point”.

      Yup…same here, save that I at least get an “installing” notification (for 20 minutes), which should say (in my playbook of Tech Writing), “installed and scanning”…it’s just that this month it took longer than ever by a almost 100% factor.

      Hi ho.

      Win7 Pro SP1 64-bit, Dell Latitude E6330, Intel CORE i5 "Ivy Bridge", Group "A/B [negative] :)", Multiple Air-Gapped backup drives in different locations, "Don't check for updates-Full Manual Mode."
      --
      "The more kinks you put in the plumbing, the easier it is to stop up the pipes!" -Scotty

      • #341496 Reply

        anonymous

        My understanding is MSRT is not a comprehensive malware tool but removes ‘prevalent malware’ (it would not be a mistake MS do not use the term ‘all known malware’ or similar). If MSRT uses the same detection methodology as Defender and someone is using Defender as their active AV, where is the gain? Presumably Defender should detect any issue within 24 hours of Microsoft adding signatures to Defender updates (assuming normal update occurs).

        If you have some malware reported that is not cleaned by your AV program, MSRT would definitely be  worth trying as a removal tool but why not download direct at the time of need?  Other vendors have free cleanup packages as well.

        You query my virus experience. Back in the 90s I found a VBA virus in Excel that was not detected by my company’s AV program. After reporting it ‘up the chain’, I manually cleaned about 100 files to remove it (and was frustrated when someone re-introduced it in one Section’s folder on the WAN leading to repeated work).  In another job and on separate occasions, I cleaned various malware off quite a few personally allocated fleet’ laptops (running Widows AV, cleaned up with non-MS software). These laptops were updating via WSUS. Presumably MSRT ran but did not clean.  A neighbor told me her laptop had been infected for a l-o-n-g time and had a swag of problems. She was right.  The laptop was close to crippled and the clean-up was painfully slow. Presumably MSRT via update didn’t fix that one either. There were other malware problems fixed over the years but my memory of these is fairly routine clean-up.

        On personal machines I don’t have a experience other than Crap Cleaner. I had that trojan detected and cleaned before  Microsoft was reported on VirusTotal as a detecting vendor.

        The examples above are not an implication that MS is worse or better than any other AV vendor. Defender is getting good test  reports now. The next virus could easily reverse the results of my limited experience.

        I suspect Microsoft intends MSRT be used as a backstop.  It is a limited malware removal tool only. My malware discipline is good and I have some experience. Those who don’t have good anti-malware discipline probably should leave MSRT run.

         

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #341578 Reply

        bsfinkel
        AskWoody Lounger

        I have never timed MRT.exe .  I know that it will run for a while, so I always install it first.  And I know that that patch will not require a reboot.  I keep a manual log of all changes to my Win 7 machine, so I need to know when and what each patch is.  If I let MRT install with other patches, I can lose track of what is installed.  After a short interval, Windows Update changes the message “Installing KB…..” to a generic message; I have no idea why.

        One problem  with installing multiple patches manually is that if more than  one requires a reboot, I have to reboot before installing another patch.  And I have a problem with NTFS on my C-drive, where Win 7 claims that the disk is corrupt and schedules a “chkdisk c:” on reboot.  That runs for 12 minutes and finds nothing to repair.  During the next backup or full scan, Windows claims that the disk is again corrupted.  I have run Gibson SpinRite at level 4 (16+ hours), and no problems were found.  So I try not to reboot more often than necessary.

         

        • #342073 Reply

          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          My understanding, and long practice, has been to (1) create a recovery point before installing “by hand” the Group B patches, and (2) reboot, to allow the installation by hand of these  patches, but only after installing all of them, regardless of whether they need individual restarts or not. As far as I can tell, I have not had problems because of this and, after all, this is what happens when installing from Windows Update: while some of those parches might need a reboot, WA does that automatically, but only after installing all the patches checked in its list (I have always kept WA set to “check for updates, but let me download and install them”.)

          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #342083 Reply

            GoneToPlaid
            AskWoody Plus

            We both perform updates in very similar ways. We both keep notes about what updates we install, and what updates we avoid. I generally install Group B updates sequentially and without rebooting until done. The exception is that sometimes I deliberately install a later update first and with a reboot, in order to take advantage of supersedence, and then I install the earlier updates.

            Oscar, what make and model is your Win7 laptop computer?

            • #342102 Reply

              OscarCP
              AskWoody Plus

              Mine is an HP Pavilion dv6t laptop, ca. 2011, with 750 GB HD (SATA, 7500 r.p.m.) , 8 GB RAM, i-& “sandy Bridge” CPU.

              It come with Win 7 installed, progressed to SP1, then to being fully patched from when I bought, in June 2011, through the end of January of this year, with those patches generally seen as OK to install, and…

              …now it has seen its last as a Win 7 machine, and is being transitioned to Linux Mint, following a most unfortunate accident.

              It happened some ten days ago, while restarting, after installing the Office 10 February updates. It did not seem to be caused by any of the updates, or at least nothing as spectacular, or even really bad, has been reported about those February updates. Ironically enough, neither CHDSK (run with /F and /R) has found anything wrong with the disk or its contents, nor have any other tests available through Windows or the pre-installed HP Tools. According to everything I have thrown at it, the reports have been, invariably, that everything is just peachy with the OS and the hardware… But the system cannot find any account of mine, so it keeps putting me in a provisional one from where little can be done, and several attempts to recover from this condition, including using System Restore a couple of times to bring the system back to a state previous to updating, have been unsuccessful. As Win 7 is out of support in less than a year, and all my data has been already backed up in an external hard disk, this is just as good a time as any to say “good night, dear Win 7, and thanks for the good times”, then move on.

               

              • This reply was modified 1 week, 3 days ago by
                 OscarCP.
              • This reply was modified 1 week, 3 days ago by
                 OscarCP.
    • #341657 Reply

      rc primak
      AskWoody_MVP

      MRT is designed to find and remove malware which could prevent other updates from installing. It is in no other way designed as a primary or even secondary antivirus tool. For that we have Windows Defender.

      MRT in my experience runs 5 to 20 mins. on my PC. Slower on less capable hardware.

      It has been a long time since any of my antimalware products have reported anything I needed to treat. That doesn’t mean I’ll stop running them.

      For my Win 10 1809 upgrade I removed Avira Free and am relying solely on Windows Defender as my active antivirus program. Malwarebytes Free can catch the malware which Microsoft chooses to ignore (mostly adware and cookies).  I find WD to be good enough now. And it won’t interfere with legitimate security updates through Windows Update, unlike many third party offerings. We’ll see if this strategy works out in the long run.

      -- rc primak

      • #341937 Reply

        bsfinkel
        AskWoody Lounger

        “MRT is designed to find and remove malware which could prevent other updates from installing.”  If that is the case, then MRT should be the first patch to be installed if there are multiple patches to install.  That was not the case the last time I did not install MRT first, as I detailed in a previous reply.

    • #341698 Reply

      phaolo
      AskWoody Lounger

      Guys, I’m going to apply the new Security-Only patches for Win7 x64 since January.

      I’ve already installed KB4474419 (Sha2) and KB4490628 (Servicing Stack, weird instructions btw).

      Are these safe from bugs and tricks, then?
      KB4480960 (S.O. Jan)
      KB4486564 (S.O. Feb)
      KB4489885 (S.O. March)
      KB4489873 (IE cumulative, March)

      • This reply was modified 1 week, 4 days ago by
         phaolo.
      • This reply was modified 1 week, 4 days ago by
         phaolo.
      • This reply was modified 1 week, 4 days ago by
         phaolo.
      • #341702 Reply

        PKCano
        Da Boss

        IE CU for March has a bug (see main blog article). Jan and Feb Rollups have passed DEFCON 3 or greater. Mar Rollup is still up in the air – too early to have full info.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #341775 Reply

      anonymous

      I read your page about the installation order of Windows SSU’s namely KB3177467 and KB3172605, and today microsoft released another SSU KB4490628 dated 12th March 2019. Im looking to do a fresh install of Windows 7 so my question is what would you advise my installation order to be? 🙂 Kind Regards

      Edit to remove HTML. Please use the “text” tab in the entry box when you copy/paste.

      Your subject is off-topic in this thread. If you are looking for answers to the installation procedure, please create a Topic in the Windows 7 Forum. Use a title that describes your question. If you copy/past the body of the topic, please use the “Text” box to prevent the HTML from being copied.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #341804 Reply

        woody
        Da Boss

        Ooops. My bad. I suggested he post the question here….

    • #342328 Reply

      Charlie
      AskWoody Plus

      I’ve just noticed KB4474419 in my the March WU’s.  It’s described as a Security update and it’s in with the Important updates.  I have not seen any separate Security Updates for Win 7 since MS started their all in one roll-ups.  Any info. on this would be appreciated.

      Win 7 Home Premium, x64, Intel i3-2120 3.3GHz, Group B

      • #342335 Reply

        PKCano
        Da Boss

        KB4474419 is the patch to implement SHA-2 level encryption in Windows Update beginning in the July/August time frame for Win7. SHA-2 will become mandatory then to receive Patches through Windows Update.

        There have been several articles on the blog about this in the last month. Check through the earlier posts.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #343440 Reply

      ashfan212
      AskWoody Lounger

      Windows 7 x64 Home Premium Group A

      I encountered a weird experience which may or may not be related to the installation of the March updates. I installed the updates successfully on March 12th. I first hid the 4 offered, checked as important updates (Monthly Rollup, SHA-2, MSRT, Office 2010 Security) ensuring that the SSU update installed first (successfully). Then I unhid the 4 offered checked updates and installed them successfully. My system rebooted successfully. I double-checked WU to confirm that all 5 March updates installed successfully. So far, so good.

      However, the 2nd time that I started my computer after having installed the March updates I received a “SYSTEM EVENT NOTIFICATION SERVICE” error. I DID NOT lose internet connectivity. My display also appeared as if I had booted my computer in safe mode. Upon researching this error, one possible solution was to open an elevated command prompt and execute the command NETSH WINSOCK RESET. Upon rebooting my computer the system event error was resolved and my display returned back to normal. I also noticed a HUGE improvement in the performance of my computer in that the time to boot my computer took about 1 minute as compared with about 5 minutes (before having run the NETSH command). Once again, there was no disruption of internet connectivity. All looked resolved so I shut down my computer. However, the next time I booted the computer my battery status indicated: ” 0% available, battery charging”. I KNOW that my battery was 100% charged prior to running the NETSH WINSOCK RESET command. My adapter was working and the Dell Battery Meter indicated that the battery was functioning normally. The only resolution I could think of was to remove the battery and reinsert it to see if the battery would begin to charge. To my surprise, when I next booted my computer, the battery meter indicated that it was charging. I am currently in the process of determining if the battery will charge to 100% capacity upon turning off the computer (the manual estimates 4 hours for the battery to charge completely).

      My question to the experts would be: 1) was the SYSTEM EVENT NOTIFICATION SERVICE error likely related to the installation of this month’s updates or mere happenstance; 2) was running the NETSH WINSOCK RESET command the appropriate means to resolving the error or did I incur risks by executing that command; 3) should I have run NETSH INT IP RESET instead or in addition to the NETSH WINSOCK RESET command; and 4) was running the NETSH command the likely cause of the battery drainage.

      I apologize if my post is inappropriate for this topic. I have posted it only because of the possibility that it was a side effect caused by the installation of the March updates. While I have done my best to resolve the issues, I would be grateful to better understand the implications of running the NETSH command and the reason why I encountered the SYSTEM EVENT NOTIFICATION SERVICE error.

       

       

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