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  • Ed Bott’s poll results: Here’s why people are sticking with Windows 7

    Home Forums AskWoody blog Ed Bott’s poll results: Here’s why people are sticking with Windows 7

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    • This topic has 35 replies, 19 voices, and was last updated 1 month ago.
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      • #2301192 Reply
        woody
        Da Boss

        Ed got more than 3,200 replies to his survey. Here’s a summary of what people are saying about moving away from Win7: DO YOU PLAN TO UPGRADE TO WINDOW
        [See the full post at: Ed Bott’s poll results: Here’s why people are sticking with Windows 7]

        4 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2301207 Reply
        Seff
        AskWoody Plus

        “only 6% of poll respondents said they’re paying for ESUs, with another 3% admitting they’re not sure. The remaining 91% are, apparently, doing without security updates.”

        What about those using 0Patch? As I recall, the ESU option was related specifically to Microsoft’s updating service.

        • #2301294 Reply
          GreatAndPowerfulTech
          AskWoody Lounger

          0patch Pro should be included in the paid support option. Free 0patch isn’t as complete, but better than no patches at all.

          GreatAndPowerfulTech

          1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2302008 Reply
          BobT
          AskWoody Lounger

          I answered No to that cause I’m not paying. Still getting them though. ;D

          Should have been “Are you installing ESUs”, hehe.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2301196 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        Few things:

        Unwanted “telemetry” is literally spying, because it is unwanted. It’s no different than climbing a tree and looking into a neighbor’s window at night, a practice which would be most unwelcome by literally anyone. The computer user does not want Microsoft monitoring what they are doing on, or with their personal equipment — and they have made this very clear. Continuing to do so anyway, is extremely wrong.

        I also wonder where Windows 10 adoption would be if Microsoft hadn’t done the following, and our corrupt government hadn’t gleefully sat back and let them.

        Woman wins $10,000 judgment against Microsoft for forced Windows 10 upgrade

        https://news.softpedia.com/news/microsoft-admits-it-went-too-far-with-aggressive-windows-10-updates-511245.shtml

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2301216 Reply
          anonymous
          Guest

          Unwanted “telemetry” is literally spying, because it is unwanted.

          Telemetry literally is NOT spying:

          As any Sherlock Holmes fan will appreciate, the most persuasive piece of evidence here is the dog that didn’t bark. Privacy researchers have had four years to dig into telemetry transmissions from Windows 10, using their own tools as well as the official data viewer. So far, no privacy advocates or government agencies have come forward with any discoveries that contradict Microsoft’s insistence that telemetry data is used only for product improvement.

          Windows 10 after four years

          It’s also NOT unwanted by the majority of one billion Windows 10 users, all of whom agreed to it.

          • #2301219 Reply
            PKCano
            Da Boss

            Because one is FORCED to agree to something to be able to use a product/utility that is NECESSARY, does NOT mean they AGREE with it. In this case, it means they have no other choice.

            • #2302019 Reply
              bbearren
              AskWoody MVP

              Because one is FORCED to agree to something to be able to use a product/utility that is NECESSARY, does NOT mean they AGREE with it. In this case, it means they have no other choice.

              You describe the bedrock of licensing—”A licensor may grant a license under intellectual property laws to authorize a use (such as copying software or using a patented invention) to a licensee, sparing the licensee from a claim of infringement brought by the licensor. A license under intellectual property commonly has several components beyond the grant itself, including a term, territory, renewal provisions, and other limitations deemed vital to the licensor.”

              Ever has it been Microsoft’s game when it comes to Windows.

              Create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates, in case you need to start over!
              "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns
              "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

          • #2301258 Reply
            Ascaris
            AskWoody_MVP

            Telemetry literally is NOT spying:

            If information is being sent from my computer without my consent, it’s spying. I don’t care what the subject of that information may be, or the end result of it. It doesn’t matter if MS is only using the telemetry data for Windows improvement… it’s my information on my PC, and if I don’t give you permission to take it and you do anyway, I would call that spying.

            I, for one, do believe Microsoft when they say they only use the telemetry data for “Windows improvement.” Specifically, it’s to “improve” the beta quality Windows releases that they push out to consumers for the benefit of the enterprise customers.

            I did not consent to any of that, so if I used Windows 10, it would be spying. And when I say “consent,” I don’t mean “grudgingly accept the EULA because I have to use Windows and I have no other choice.” I mean “consent” in the EU definition, meaning that I freely agree to give the info without any requirement that I do so in order to gain greater functionality. If I have to consent to use Windows, it’s not truly consent.

            Microsoft has a monopoly on PC operating systems. Monopolies are not illegal in and of themselves, but they do (depending on the laws of the country in question) subject a monopolist to additional restrictions. Apple can get away with things with MacOS that Windows cannot. If you have chosen to use MacOS but you don’t like Apple’s terms, you’re free to use something else, but if you don’t like Microsoft’s terms, their status as monopolist means the utility of using something else is greatly diminished. Much of the software that people need is not available on other platforms, and that is directly a function of Microsoft’s market share. Microsoft’s ability to just say “go use something else if you don’t like our terms” is not as strong as Apple’s. It would be up to the courts to determine to what degree that is true.

            I think the only thing saving MS from action by the governments of the world now is the mobile market. MS has a monopoly on the desktop, but the desktop is not the only choice anymore. The perception that MS has already “been there, done that” in terms of anticompetitive behavior is part of it also. It should, if anything, subject them to greater scrutiny in the future, now that their proclivity to behave unethically has been legally established.

            Group "L" (KDE Neon Linux 5.20.3 User Edition)

        • #2301223 Reply
          Seff
          AskWoody Plus

          Perhaps the more revealing question is where would Windows 10 adoption be if Microsoft had charged their normal price for an OS upgrade rather than offering it for free?

          3 users thanked author for this post.
          • #2301235 Reply
            Microfix
            AskWoody MVP

            Perhaps the more revealing question is where would Windows 10 adoption be if Microsoft had charged their normal price for an OS upgrade rather than offering it for free?

            they don’t need to deal with refunds.

            No problem can be solved from the same level of consciousness that created IT - AE
            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #2301241 Reply
              Alex5723
              AskWoody Plus

              Perhaps the more revealing question is where would Windows 10 adoption be if Microsoft had charged their normal price for an OS upgrade rather than offering it for free?

              they don’t need to deal with refunds.

              Microsoft still does as Windows 10 isn’t free (only upgrades are).
              People that don’t agree to the EULA / want to install Linux.. get refunded for not using the pre-installed Windows 10, usually $50.

              3 users thanked author for this post.
            • #2301244 Reply
              Ricard
              AskWoody Plus

              I specifically didn’t want a FREE upgrade to Windows 10, in the hope that when Microsoft eventually had to convince people to PAY for the thing, the company would give more attention to what people really wanted (stability, compatibility, less churn, etc).

              Adoption of a normal-priced Windows 10 may have been slower, but would quality/user satisfaction have been higher if Microsoft didn’t feel that they can do anything they think is best because, hey , free?

              And since most people only pay for Windows 10 as part of a new computer, where the price is basically hidden (or got the free upgrade) I’m still waiting.

              Win 7 Pro, 64-Bit, Group B ESU,Ivy Bridge i3-3110M, 2.4GHz, 4GB, XP Mode VM, WordPerfect
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        • #2301290 Reply
          PaulK
          AskWoody Lounger

          Syntax and qualifiers matter:

          Unwanted “telemetry” is literally spying,

          doesn’t assert that telemetry is spying, is asserts that Unwanted “telemetry” is. Qualifiers cannot be ignored without distortion. Many quote the Bible as saying that ‘money is the root of all evil’. No it doesn’t. It says that ‘the love of money is a root of all sorts of evil’. Tobacco (in the field) isn’t going to cause cancer, but smoking it for an extensive time likely will. Alcohol in a bottle is harmless, but excessive (the definition may be fluid) usage … .

          2 users thanked author for this post.
          • #2301291 Reply
            anonymous
            Guest

            For anyone using Windows it’s not unwanted because “accept”.

            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #2301375 Reply
              Ricard
              AskWoody Plus

              Have you NOT heard the phrase, “an offer you can’t refuse”? In life, we accept many things we don’t particularly want, for many reasons. EULA’s have long been considered by many to be unethical and borderline illegal (if not actually illegal but too hard to fight.) I’d be very surprised if there weren’t something in Microsoft’s license terms that you really don’t agree with, but you let it slide to use the software that needs the OS. As noted above, some “consent” in the US is not at all consent in the EU.

              Win 7 Pro, 64-Bit, Group B ESU,Ivy Bridge i3-3110M, 2.4GHz, 4GB, XP Mode VM, WordPerfect
              1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2301255 Reply
        Microfix
        AskWoody MVP

        Well Ed Bott actually quoted a couple of my questionare replies but one thing that needs commented on is this:

        Privacy/telemetry/spying (3%)
        I was just a bit surprised that this number was so low, but what they lacked in numbers..

        That’s ’cause we are using abbodi86’s script! 😛
        Also the many informative techie nitty gritty posts on askwoody prior to the script.
        Thanks to @MrBrian, @Woody, @PKCano, @abbodi86, @ch100 and many others for that!

        No problem can be solved from the same level of consciousness that created IT - AE
        6 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2301305 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        Put me in the following categories:

        Updates are too intrusive: No comment needed

        Privacy/telemetry/spying : Win 7 is more than amply bad.

        Fear: I use a test device. It is no longer supported and stuck in the S version.  Why risk my desktop machine.

        Compatibility: Linked to the above

      • #2301977 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        There are some good posts here and “Patch Lady’s what would you change about Windows 10?” such as Ascaris post there Oct 3 2020 9:38 pm and on this thread about your telemetry data flying home to Microsoft. The reasons for sticking to Windows 7 sp1 but can be broadly classified in two categories expense and mistrust. For example my clients say they use Windows 7 sp1 instead of Windows “10.xxx.zzz” is expense and mistrust (in Microsoft). And, Microsoft has had its share of bad products.  As Woody has pointed out the firing of Windows 10 testers and just is shifting testing expense to customers. The privacy/telemetry/spying issue and its removal, as noted by Microfix, can be done with a script or manually. But, that takes time and time is money. It also equals mistrust in Microsoft. As another poster mentioned is the mistrust of legal tricks in Windows 10 is cleverly hidden legalese and small frames with checkboxes. If Microsoft is giving away something for free it really means the total cost of all useful components is likely to be high. Nobody knows the total cost in Windows products.

      • #2301999 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        There’s nothing wrong with WINDOWS 10. It’s just accrued a BAD NAME.
        I’ve organised my W10 to look and function in a previous Windows style.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2302015 Reply
        rontpxz81
        AskWoody Lounger

        I only recently upgraded to Win 10 because some newer games and software dropped Win 7 compatibility- otherwise I would have kept Win 7 and used 0patch.

        I hate Win 10 because it is harder for me to use, navigate and control-and I miss Aero.  And then the extra work reviewing each month’s updates- I’d be lost without AskWoody.

        7 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2302029 Reply
        Canadian Tech
        AskWoody_MVP

        I have many reasons why I will not use Windows 10.  The biggest reason by far is Windows Update.  It is miserably badly mismanaged and causes far too many problems.  At least with Win7 I can manage/control it.

        I have been using Windows since the beginning and on literally hundreds of PCs.  Before I go too far here, I must make it clear that I am speaking of the average home PC, not the enterprise one.

        One thing is sterling clear to me.  The vast majority of WU is really paranoia.  Cases of PCs that went south because they were not updated are rare.  Far more rare than the problems caused by WU.

        I have 120 client Win7 systems that have not had a single WU in 3 years and 8 months.  Not a single instance of any kind of problem.  NONE!!!

        Instead, those systems just wake up every day and work.  Work exactly as they did the day before.  Completely stable steady-state machines that are totally reliable.

        It would be impossible to achieve that for the vast majority of people with Win10’s forced updates.

        CT

        14 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2302048 Reply
          Carl D
          AskWoody Lounger

          “The vast majority of WU is really paranoia” – CT.

          I’ve been thinking the same thing for a long time now. A perfect example is the Meltdown and Spectre hysteria that “rocked the computer world” (as an article at the time stated) what was it… nearly 3 years ago now? And, how many exploits in the wild for these have we seen since then? I believe the answer is still ZERO.

          I get the impression sometimes that maybe the vast majority of these monthly “security updates” do absolutely nothing (now, wouldn’t THAT “rock the computer world” if it were true?) when they’re installed and they’re just fabricated by security researchers and MS to keep Windows users on ‘the perpetual patch treadmill’ which, in my opinion, serves 2 purposes – it keeps these “security researchers” in a job and it allows MS to keep a ‘leash’ on customers’ computers with the never ending patches.

          Reminds me a bit of a James Bond movie from the late 1990’s (can’t remember the name of it offhand) where the villain headed a huge software company and a certain scene had one of his ‘underlings’ reporting that their latest operating system was ready to be released and, of course, it contained a sufficient number of (deliberate) ‘bugs’ to ensure users would have to keep updating for years to come.

          Can’t help but think they were having a ‘dig’ at MS there.  I’m certain they were even though Windows 98 or 98SE was probably the latest Windows at the time. And, nothing has changed in the 20+ years since. In fact, it has gotten worse especially since the release of Windows 10.

          Gigabyte GA-B250M-D3H Motherboard, Intel i5-7600 CPU, 32GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 850 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 20H2 64bit.

          2 users thanked author for this post.
          • #2302083 Reply
            Canadian Tech
            AskWoody_MVP

            Carl, I did not mean to suggest that this was largely done by MS strategically. I really do not believe there is a conspiracy here.

            I do believe there is a very significant difference between an enterprise and home installation. There are a lot of very well meaning individuals who do a great job of sounding the horns for enterprises as they should be.

            I think the error here is in extending the urgency of this to the typical ma and pa PC. In that setting, there is no competence to deal with the havoc that MS reeks when it screws up. At the same time ma and pa do not have a business to run at stake, at least not with their home PC.

            In the trenches doing the support work I have done for many years, I have concluded that without a doubt, there is almost nothing to be gained by constant updating resulting in the problems created by MS problem-prone, un-tested updating. I believe my experience of 4800 problem-free PC months of use is a clear demonstration of my position.

            CT

            5 users thanked author for this post.
          • #2302339 Reply
            Ascaris
            AskWoody_MVP

            The vast majority of WU is really paranoia” – CT. I’ve been thinking the same thing for a long time now. A perfect example is the Meltdown and Spectre hysteria that “rocked the computer world” (as an article at the time stated) what was it… nearly 3 years ago now? And, how many exploits in the wild for these have we seen since then? I believe the answer is still ZERO.

            To be fair, it could be the case that the reason these vulnerabilities have not been subject to more exploit attempts was that the computing world freaked out about it and rushed to patch it immediately (even if those results negatively impacted performance and stability). If the would-be malware authors were convinced that most people were already protected, the effort required to create a working exploit (Spectre is notoriously difficult to exploit) would not be worth it.

            If that’s the case, the people who patched early and took the performance/stability hit performed a service to those of us who don’t want to take the hit. In the case of my Acer Swift, using the microcode update with the mitigations would mean tolerating frequent lockups. That’s not tolerable, but fortunately, there’s not much actual risk to reverting it. Even MS backed out the microcode for the Swift’s CPU (Pentium N4200) and went back to the prior release.

            Of course, that low risk may also be why Intel chose not to release a new microcode update  that is stable and has the mitigations, so there’s that…

             

            Group "L" (KDE Neon Linux 5.20.3 User Edition)

            1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2303452 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        Woah! people let’s just sit back & think on the ‘problem?’ eh?
        How many attacks have we had on Win 7 OS  since it was ‘officially deaded’
        Is that silence I hear?
        Most of your intrusions are going to come through your browser or through your e-mail
        & whilst the former is dangerous but usually guarded against by keeping the browser
        updated & for the latter just remember back to ‘I love you’ & be a bit sensible.
        Hovering a mouse pointer over an e-mail link will tell you where the link really goes to & if
        it looks suspicious then it probably 100% is.
        With a reasonable AV (suite?) & running your machine as a user & not as admin
        & with at least weekly backups (& that’s a backup at the start of the day when all boots
        correctly rather than the end when you may have hoovered up all sorts of rubbish) & being
        wary of e-mails & doing browser updates, your security under 7 will be as good as it ever
        was OS updates or no.
        & yes on the odd occasion I need to do something financial I do actually (dual boot) go to
        Win 10 (with all phone home options killed off with some easily downloaded software
        which appears to work & yes I have not completely ignored your very good advice Susan
        Bradley)
        for maximum everything updated security & then return to the comfort of 7 for the 99.99%
        of my PC usage.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2303519 Reply
          doriel
          AskWoody Lounger

          Agreed.
          People, please dont be so overwhealmed by all the annoncement about security and how you should update to windows 10! Of course there will be ALWAYS some security risk discovered. Its given as tommorow the sun will rise!

          Words of wisdom, mr. Anonymous:

          Most of your intrusions are going to come through your browser or through your e-mail
          & whilst the former is dangerous but usually guarded against by keeping the browser
          updated & for the latter just remember back to ‘I love you’ & be a bit sensible.

          Exactly. Malware gets to you if you open infected attachement, or you surf through pages, that are obviously dangerous. Adult sites, torrents, .. And I solved many infections on PC. And all users admitted, that they visited potentially dangerous places. OS cannot protect us against us.
          PS – Its good to have systems fully patched, that should be standard state, but its definitelly not a reason why everybody should go to the most buggiest system in the history of IT (I mean W10 is definatelly world record holder for most bugs and issues per user).

          Dell Latitude E6530, Intel Core i5 @ 2.6 GHz, 4GB RAM, W10 1809 Enterprise

          HAL3000, AMD Athlon 200GE @ 3,4 GHz, 8GB RAM, Fedora 29

        • #2303609 Reply
          Charlie
          AskWoody Plus

          I agree too, the highest security risk is the person behind the keyboard and mouse.  But the second highest is the built in Internet Explorer 11 that is hard to get rid of.  Even though I don’t use it, I have my Win 7 IE 11 locked down to the highest security settings and all Active X, Java, etc. removed or disabled.  Firefox is and has been my default browser for many years, and I use UBlock Origin for added convenience/security from unwanted pop ups and ads.

          Group L

      • #2303547 Reply
        George S. Augustas
        AskWoody Plus

        I read all of the above, and I have a different reason for sticking with Windows 7. I upgraded this computer to Windows 10, and it developed a “glitch” in the sound that I could not get rid of. It affected every program that used sound–from Windows startup to Youtube. It was so annoying that I had to revert to Windows 7. I suspect that this computer is too old to run Windows 10 (as I am), so I am just stuck until I get a newer machine. But this one works for me, so I feel no urgency to replace it.

        • #2304010 Reply
          JimT777
          AskWoody Plus

          I read all of the above, and I have a different reason for sticking with Windows 7. I upgraded this computer to Windows 10, and it developed a “glitch” in the sound that I could not get rid of. It affected every program that used sound–from Windows startup to Youtube. It was so annoying that I had to revert to Windows 7. I suspect that this computer is too old to run Windows 10 (as I am), so I am just stuck until I get a newer machine. But this one works for me, so I feel no urgency to replace it.

          You don’t mention just how old your old computer is.  I’m running Windows 10 Pro version 20H2 on an eleven year old Toshiba Satellite Pro laptop, and it works just fine.  I do have open-shell installed to give it the look and feel of Windows 7, because I don’t care for Windows 10’s desktop, but other than that I have no issues with the OS.  I must admit, though, that I was really slow to bite the bullet and do the upgrade from Windows 7, which was one of the best versions ever.  I’ve used and serviced every version of Windows going all the way back to Windows 3.11.

          • #2304624 Reply
            George S. Augustas
            AskWoody Plus

            This computer is a Dell E6400. It’s over ten years old. I got it refurbished. The drivers are all eight years old or older, and there are no new drivers available. I have also used Windows from 3.1 forward. I’m about to bite the bullet and get a new one, though, because this one is acting flaky lately. The CPU goes into overload if try to watch a video on YouTube, for example, and I cannot figure out why. So I figure I’ll be on Windows 10 before very long. I have to shop around, though, because I like Dell computers, and they don’t make them with DVD drives anymore, which I still want even though everyone says I don’t need one.

            • #2304625 Reply
              Canadian Tech
              AskWoody_MVP

              George, you can buy an external DVD player for about $30. Just make sure the USB is plug compatible.

              CT

              1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #2306063 Reply
              TaskForce141
              AskWoody Lounger

              By default, Youtube streams video with the newer VP9 codec, which is not supported by the Intel GMA4500MHD onboard video of your Dell Latitude E6400.  That means video is decoded in software by your CPU, making it run hot.

              VP9 is a Google invention that cuts their data costs, but transfers the burden to you, if you have an older machine that doesn’t support VP9 decoding in hardware.   In this case, Google is looking out for its bottom line and ignoring the overheating laptops of its users. Just about every other site uses the web standard h.264 AVC codec, which is supported by the GMA4500 family (exception: some premium streaming sites use h.265, a different codec also not supported by GMA4500).

              What to do: you can force Youtube to serve h.264 video with the h264ify extension for Firefox, Chrome, and other Chromium-based browsers.  That will let your onboard GPU take over the job and keep your CPU free and run cooler.

      • #2303549 Reply
        Canadian Tech
        AskWoody_MVP

        It is corny, but true. If it aint broke, don’t fix it.

        CT

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2303700 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        Well, I don’t care for the privacy relaxation incorporated into the WIN10 EULA so I have turned my back to WIN10 this long.  There are a few applications that will not run under WIN7 (notably TurboTax), so I have a virtual machine running on my WIN7 system that holds a WIN10 installation solely for TurboTax.

        Similar situation on my Macbook Pro machine – I have 32 bit apps that will not run on a 64 bit Catalina OS, so I’m stuck with Mojave….

      • #2303842 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        Woah! again & not being shot down there I will continue:

        There is nothing wrong with Win 10 that has not been wrong with every other Win since 3.11 & tinkerers & the interested & the mechanics & those who take advice from fora like these(I came from Fred Langa & my subscription goes to 2200 & something ………..thanks Fred & I have put it in my will).

        The real problem with Win 10 is the loss of control we generally had with it’s predecessors & you have to go in at every update (which is now a chore to control) & make sure every detail you whipped into shape last time has not been subtly altered to undo your work, unlike the good old days when we had control over updates if & when without the arm wrestle.

        I do not think that there is any malign intent from MS but rather the attitude that we are all out of our depth & they will take over & make everything run smoothly.

        Look at any ‘security suite’ & you will see the same loss of user control with every update & this is just the mindset of the writers who start with the assumption that they are the source of all wisdom & we should bow before them, though, I am sure this is a bit of exaggeration on my part.I generally get around 3 years out of any suite before i lose enough control to move on to another & the cycle continues.

        I am sticking (except as I said for high security needed financials) with Win 7 because it is a very comfortable old pair of jeans, so comfortable in fact that all I have to do is listen to the hum of the engine to know that everything is well with the world, forgive me for waxing lyrical.

        If you want a useful & secure browser then Firefox & Epic are the way to go & I use both plus some others just for fun & am not looking for an argument where size matters. These are just my suggestions & what i am happy with & what I use

        If you want a decent search engine then Startpage is the way to go & yes I know Sp has had some speculative bad publicity in the dark pages of the net recently but I am sticking with it for the present as I can find (so far) no problems in its entrails which would change my mind.

        If you want a decent AV my advice today may not be the same down the track so use what suits you & funnily enough when mine went south in Win 10 Defender jumped in & took over to ‘protect me’ till I noticed something was amiss & if for nothing else then thanks MS though it may have been my running Defender at the same time as my default AV with updates via Task Manager & not normal Win updates & I am sure how to do it will be in this forum somewhere or you may just have to do a little work on a search engine to track it down.

        The more guards on the wall the safer you will be & ‘apparently’ Defender comes in with high marks & as it had little overheads why not?

         

        • #2303854 Reply
          doriel
          AskWoody Lounger

          anonymous wrote:

          I am sticking (except as I said for high security needed financials) with Win 7 because it is a very comfortable old pair of jeans, so comfortable in fact that all I have to do is listen to the hum of the engine to know that everything is well with the world

          Nicely written, sir.

          In Czech, we say: “Dobrý sluha, zlý pán.”
          Which basically means: “Good servant, evil lord.”

          I think thats exactly what happened here. Windows 7 was great servant and we loved it. Windows 10 is basically dictate of power and it takes unescessarilly lot of effort to make it work as you (owner of your computer and microsoft customer) want. And thats the problem why people stick with Windows 7.

          But world wont stop spinning. In the end I abbandoned Windows 7. I learned to work with Windows 10 – in the corporate world, where updates are handeled differently from home users, its quite functional, but one has to pay attention. And pay money. In order to have sustainable systems (LSTB/LSTC branches). And since there is not much alternatives, companies will continue to use Windows.

          At home, I ascended 🙂 to Linux (Fedora distro) few years ago and I am happy. And I earn extra money for repairing notebooks and PCs, that are damaged by updates. So.. Should I say “Thank you, Microsoft,” in the end?
          Nah, I dont think so, because Microsoft made computing unnescessarilly suffering.

          Dell Latitude E6530, Intel Core i5 @ 2.6 GHz, 4GB RAM, W10 1809 Enterprise

          HAL3000, AMD Athlon 200GE @ 3,4 GHz, 8GB RAM, Fedora 29

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    Reply To: Ed Bott’s poll results: Here’s why people are sticking with Windows 7

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