• eliminating new Office365 user

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    #2485793

    I have a “family” (multiuser) Office 365 subscription.  When I purchased a new pc for my adult daughter, the store initialized it incorrectly, in transferring her files from the former “bricked” pc and starting a new user utilizing one of the available six user available in my multiple-user Microsoft 365 subscription.  In essence, they placed her in my user setting as a child user, and using Teams as a binding utility.  Thus all of my OneDrive files show in her file manager listings under OneDrive.  Every effort (including wiping and rebuilding the system) the store experts made to unbind the files and install a separate user authorization leave this joint access (or at least its file structure) in her files.  It seems to be permanently tied to her Microsoft account.

    If I disable her sub-subscription from my pc OneDrive end, and she rebuilds her system after wiping, would she then be able to use one of OneDrive sub-subscriptions without linking to mine?  It would be nice to use the OneDrive, or at least the Office utilities associated with the subscription – and independently of what I do in my user partition.

    At the same time, we need to get her Outlook going (assuming we get the OneDrive files problem fixed).  In her former pc, she had independent (not web based) files and Outlook capabilities (I am not sure of what vintage).  The data file is well hidden, but we found it.  How do we use this as the basis for her new Outlook (whether OneDrive or another subscription)?

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    • #2485818

      So as I’m reading it, she needs a standalone Outlook (full install) from there you can attach the pst file to Outlook.

      As to the One drive issue, let me see if I can get Peter to look at this. I’m not sure in a family plan you can unlink.

      Susan Bradley Patch Lady

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      • #2485829

        Thanks for the rapid response!

        Microsoft is loose with its terminology.  It uses “family” (their term) within an “instance” (my terminology) to describe parent-child relationships, where parental limitations can be placed on the child, etc..

        It also offers single-user and multiple-user “family” plans for OneDrive, where “family” is meant (as I read it) to allow six totally independent users access to OneDrive features (Office suite, 1 TB memory, and 50GB (I think) Outlook partitions.  I believe this led to the initial difficulties, where the store tech squad assumed the first version whereas we meant the second version.

        And to make it even more confusing, the store tied things together with Microsoft Teams in the first system build, although this was not included in subsequent system builds.

    • #2485943

      As you’ve noted, the terminology isn’t clear and I admit having trouble understanding what has happened. You seem to have two problems:
      – your OneDrive files/folders appearing on your daughters computer
      – how to migrate Outlook data to the new computer.

      Let me make some broad remarks.

      “child” as in “Child account” has a very specific meaning in Microsoft 365 land. It refers to their Family Safety service where a ‘child’ can be added to a parents M365 acccount. I suspect that’s not what you mean but using that term adds confusion to the outside readers.
      Of course there’s also “Microsoft 365 Family” the six-user plan – the additional users are usually called “extra users” or similar. I’d avoid using the term ‘child’ to save confusion, even though she is your child <g>.

      > I believe this led to the initial difficulties, where the store tech
      > squad assumed the first version whereas we meant the second version.

      Possibly, but that doesn’t explain all the behaviours you’re describing. Hard to understand why the tech person would have used the fairly obscure Family Safety thing instead of the well-known extra user on an existing Family plan.

      Assuming I understand it right … it’s hard to understand how your daughters Microsoft 365 account has mixed up her OneDrive files/folders with yours. I suggest doing some tests to see if this ‘mash up’ was a one-time copy of content or a live shared link.

      Add a file/folder to your OneDrive account and see if it appears in your daughters OneDrive then try vice-versa.

      > OneDrive sub-subscriptions without linking to mine?

      I can’t see a way for one OneDrive account to totally link into another except by either copying data or sharing a lot of content on a OneDrive account. Either or those seems improbable by a competant tech person.

      Sorry this isn’t more helpful but I’ve had a hard time understanding what you’re describing and what’s happened. May I suggest you work with your daughter and the support people to carefully identify what the current status of the two accounts is, what’s shared between the OneDrive accounts and if that sharing is still happening.

      Exactly what Microsoft account is the new computer using – both the Windows login and Office apps?

      Migrating Outlook
      A separate matter to the above. It all depends on what mailboxes where connected to the previous Outlook. As Susan says, there may be a PST involved or it’s quite possible that there’s no local data involved since all the info is saved in the cloud. You need to figure out what exact mailboxes are involved and what data, if any, was saved on the old computer. Either way, there are many online resources that will help with each scenario.

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    • #2486376

      My daughter’s pc has been scrubbed clean (C:drive-wise) and rebuilt, with the old .pst file (from active former Outlook) and several older files as history.  She has no Outlook or Office capabilities.  Can:

      • she take on another gmail main e-mail account;
      • use that as a target for another separate OneDrive user authorization in her pc (from me sending an invitation to that e-mail from my One-Drive subscription;
      • set up Office from that OneDrive;
      • set up Outlook from that OneDrive;
      • import her old .pst file to that Outlook;
      • forward any e-mail sent to the old gmail address to this mailbox;
      • and live life happily until the next update screws things up?

      If not, how does she recover what she had and proceed with meaningful e-mail?

      • #2486383

        Again, there’s a mix of terminology so it’s hard to give firm answers.  In particular “set up Office from that OneDrive;”.  Office or Outlook isn’t setup from OneDrive.  Outlook software is part of Office anyway.  Which type of Office will be installed? – that affects the OneDrive quota available.

        You seem to be suggesting that your daughter is setting up a new Gmail account which is possible but why?  Just use the existing Gmail account on the new computer and setup Outlook linked to the ‘old’ Gmail account.

        Certainly you can setup a new mail account then, usually, forward messages from the old to new account — but if they are both on Gmail there hardly seems to be any point unless there’s a change of name.

        If making a new mailbox and using Outlook software – consider setting up on Outlook.com which has better features and links to Outlook software than Outlook does to Gmail.

        As to the .PST — data from that can be copied into the new Outlook data file once a mailbox is setup on Outlook desktop.  However I can’t give any firm advice on that because there’s the possibility that data in the .PST file is also saved on the old Gmail cloud mailbox.  Simply copying across may result in duplicates – check what’s in the .PST and in the ‘new’ mailbox before doing any copying.

        In addition, older Outlook connections to Gmail used POP/SMTP saved to a .PST but more modern connections use IMAP with a .OST meaning all local data should also be saved in the cloud mailbox.

        > how does she recover what she had and proceed with meaningful e-mail?

        I think you/she needs more direct advice from someone who can see the current setup and understand what you want to achieve.

        Peter D/

    • #2486486

      Okay – I may be stubborn, but:

      We have now wiped and “rebuilt” her pc.  There is no Office or Outlook on that pc.

      I have removed her as an authorized user in my 365 family listing.

      May I send her an invitation to become a user of one of the “family” authorizations without 365 bring back her old settings and file structure?  …with the former gmail user name?  …or would she need a new user name? 

       

      Many thanks again!

      • #2486500

        Outlook mailbox settings are not copied from one Office setup to another.  Some other Outlook settings might be copied to a new install, but not the mailbox/account details and definitely not the local mailbox store .PST

        Even if the mailbox settings were copied (they are not) all anyone has to do it delete the existing mail account in Outlook or entire Outlook profile the setup mailboxes from scratch.

        You can issue a new Microsoft 365 Family invitation to whichever email address she wishes.  It’s the email address of the Microsoft account that matters not ‘user name’.  Most people use the same email address so their main settings come across. As I’ve already mentioned those settings do NOT include Outlook mailbox setup.

        OneDrive folders can be copied/synced to the new computer – depending on which Microsoft account is used.  Obviously, the local Documents and other folder structures aren’t changed.

        As I mentioned before, creating a new email address and Microsoft account should not be necessary.  And doing that usually creates more trouble than it might solve.  It should not be necessary to do that.

        Peter D/

         

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    • #2486535

      Thanks very much!

      Let’s see if I can comprehend.

      If I send an invitation to her Microsoft account e-mail, all it will do is allow her to use the Microsoft 365 software.  Once set up, the desire is to gain access to the last several years of email files.  I was hoping these would be in the .pst file that was rescued from the bricked pc, so that if that file were imported to the new setup, she would gain access to her email files, including s”sent,” the received e-mails, and stored e-mails folders.  It may also include the Calendar and Contacts folders.  IF SO, she could pick up where she left off before the bricking.

      Is this a pipe dream?

      Thanks for training this illiterate user!

    • #2486536

      Almost there …

      > If I send an invitation to her Microsoft account e-mail, all it will do is allow her to use the Microsoft 365 software.

      Yes and access some additional M365 extras like the 1TB OneDrive quota.

      I was hoping these would be in the .pst file that was rescued from the bricked pc, so that if that file were imported to the new setup, she would gain access to her email files, including s”sent,” the received e-mails, and stored e-mails folders.  It may also include the Calendar and Contacts folders.

      Can’t guarantee what the .PST contains. It should have old Inbox and Sent Items, maybe other mail folders (if any).  Possibly, but less likely, Calendar and Contact data.
      There will have been changes to her mailbox between the time the .PST was last synced and now so she can’t exactly “pick up where she left off”.  The current mailbox and the .PST have to be carefully examined and merged to avoid duplicates.
      The .PST does NOT have the mailbox connection data — that’s setup in Outlook. The PST only has some locally cached mail and perhaps some other folders .

      Peter D/

       

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    • #2486550

      I’m of to pick up the pc.  Let’s see what happens!

      I deeply appreciate your patience is responding to my questions.  I wish the Geek Squad had some more expertise and, of course, MS did us no favors in closing their stores a few years ago (although I found that only a small percentage of techs had understanding).

    • #2486668

      We spent hours on the restored pc Saturday, some at the Best Buy store and some in my retirement cottage.  And my daughter now has a working pc, Outlook, MS Office apps, OneDrive, etc.  Two e-mail accounts have been recovered and almost all of the files restored.  There still is more to go (more history to recover), but we advanced much farther than I dared hope.

      I thank you (and Susan) from the depths of my heart for your patient and valuable guidance!

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