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  • Eudora 7.1.0.9 runs amok with 2M+ copies of same email!

    Posted on alexcris Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Home Forums AskWoody support Questions: Browsers and desktop software Eudora 7.1.0.9 runs amok with 2M+ copies of same email!

    This topic contains 43 replies, has 11 voices, and was last updated by

     satrow 3 weeks, 5 days ago.

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    • #1852038 Reply

      alexcris
      AskWoody Plus

      I’m running Win10 Pro 1809.  I’m also using Eudora 7.1.0.9 as my desktop
      email software.  And now it’s defunct.  I’m in software hell.  I wrote
      to Woody about my subscription, and when he replied, it came in the form
      of 2, 097,183 (!) emails with the same subject line! I’ve tried a little
      troubleshooting but cannot find a way to get my Eudora back.  I could
      reinstall my computer with Acronis backup, but I’m hoping a loyal Eudora
      person will have some tips on restoring it.  I’ve tried renaming the
      In.mbx to Oldin.mbx, (and In.toc to Oldin.toc) but that doesn’t do anything.
      And In.mbx.001 and .002 show the same size of 2,097,183 kb.  Please help. 
      Thank you!

    • #1853620 Reply

      GoneToPlaid
      AskWoody Plus

      Hi alexcris,

      I know exactly what is going on here. I too use Eudora 7.1.0.9 which is a 32-bit email program. As such, Eudora has limitations, for each .MBX file, in terms of the total number of contained messages and in terms of the maximum file size for the .MBX file.

      I am guessing that you just encountered this issue today, since you posted today?

      I have to head out and run a couple of errands. I will reply again later this evening with instructions for how to fix your issues.

      Best regards,

      –GTP

       

    • #1853868 Reply

      GoneToPlaid
      AskWoody Plus

      Hi alexcris,

      As mentioned, Eudora is an older 32-bit program. The maximum file size which any 32-bit program generally can access is 2GB, unless they support the “large address aware” flag which can allow 32-bit programs to access files up to 4GB. I also recall that that maximum number of messages which can be in any Eudora .MBX file is either 16383, 32737, or 65535 messages. I don’t remember which, since a friend of mine encountered this issue nearly 20 years ago.

      Eudora on your computer suddenly started to freak out after it hit the limit for either the maximum number of messages which can be in any .MBX folder, or when the .MBX folder tried to exceed the 2GB maximum file size limitation.

      The above are the technical details. If you don’t understand them, the upshot is that either the number of messages in a Eudora .MBX hit the maximum limit, or that the .MBX file itself hit the maximum size limit.

      Make sure that Eudora is not running. Then follow these initial steps…

      1. Rename the Oldin.mbx and Oldin.toc files back to their original In.mbx and In.toc file names.

      2. In Windows Explorer, hold down your keyboard’s Ctrl key and then click on the the In.mbx and In.toc files in order to select these two files. After selecting these two files, release the Ctrl key. Then type Ctrl-C and then Ctrl-V. Doing so automatically creates copies of these two files. It is always good to have backup copies!

      3. Now, copy the entire contents of your Eudora folder to another location on your computer’s hard drive, so that you have a backup.

      Alrighty! You now have restored the original file names and made copies of these two all important files, and you now have a full backup of your Eudora folder saved to a different place on your computer’s hard drive.

      4. In Windows Explorer, please look at and report the names and file sizes of all .MBX files in your Eudora folder. I am only interested in seeing the file sizes for any .MBX files which are huge, and around 2GB in size. If any .MBX folder names are confidential, simply make up a false name so that you can report it. I am particular about not allowing anyone to accidentally disclose confidential information — even if it is as simple as a file name. The upshot is that I simply want to determine what file(s) you need to fix, in the following initial step.

      5. This is the most important initial step. Here, we want to see if and when your Windows 10 computer saved, within System Restore Points, previous versions of the file contents of your Eudora folder. Attached is a screen capture for previous date and times for my Eudora FOLDER. Do NOT search for previous file information within System Restore Points for any specific file in your Eudora folder. Instead, right-click on the Eudora folder, then click Properties, and then click on the Previous Versions tab in the popup window.

      Attached is a screen capture of the Previous Versions tab for my Eudora folder, in which you can see some dates and times which I could restore the Eudora folder to. You will note that I blacked out some confidential information, due to my line of work.

      The goal is to make sure that, if you choose to restore a previous version of your Eudora folder, that Eudora will indeed work correctly and without errors. The additional goal is to see if there exists a very recent System Restore Point for Previous Versions of your Eudora folder, such that you do not have to perform a restore from your Acronis backup.

      The upshot is that we want to see if you can recover, and as most recently as possible, all of your Eudora emails, without resorting to restoring from your older Acronis backup.

      Final Notes…

      Once recovery is complete, the very first thing which you will want to do is, within Eudora, to create a new mailbox called In_older.mbx. You will then want to highlight at least a several hundred of the oldest email messages in your In.mbx and move them to this new In_older.mbx. The moving of the messages may take a few to several minutes. This solution is merely a “quick and dirty” method of mitigating the limitations which caused your issues, and to allow you to once again to be able to receive and send emails. You will want to follow up by creating more .MBX folders, named by year, into which you will move all messages for a given year. Eudora can readily search a plethora of .MBX folders. The key is to avoid the limitations which I mentioned at the very top of this post.

      Best regards,

      –GTP

       

      Eudora_Folder_Properties_Previous_Versions

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      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1853920 Reply

      alexcris
      AskWoody Plus

      As mentioned, Eudora is an older 32-bit program. The maximum file size which any 32-bit program generally can access is 2GB

      Thanks very much for your reply!  By the way, I always make sure that my In.mbx is well within Eudora’s limits.  The surprise was with Woody’s response to my question about subscription, that it created a mailbox over 2GB.  I do not have any previous versions available.  Eeek.  I envy yours.  I first attempted a system restore–twice–and it wouldn’t restore:  it said perhaps an anti-virus program interfered.  So I disabled Norton, firewall and anti-virus.  No dice when I tried again.  I found on a forum:  “Eudora has a limit of 32767 messages in a single mailbox.”

      Oops.  I just realized that I recently reinstalled Malwarebytes and did not disable it when I attempted system restore.  I’ll do that now.

      Do you think it’s possible that Woody’s response, his very email, did something to trigger this monumental surge in In.mbx size?

      [Mod edit] please limit the size of quotes by highlighting a small section of the original post before clicking “quote”.

      • #1854466 Reply

        GoneToPlaid
        AskWoody Plus

        Hi alexcris,

        Previous versions of files are saved when System Restore points are created. If System Restore isn’t configured to use a larger percentage of the total disk space, then previous versions for only some files are saved. Personally, I set System Restore to use up to 40% of disk space on the OS hard drives of my computers. System Restore never comes close to using that much space since I use CCleaner to manually delete much older System Restore points which I no longer need.

        Have you saved a copy of your Eudora folder to another location on your computer? How recent is your Acronis backup? How much disk space is System Restore allowed to use?

        Here is a link which shows you how to enable and configure System Restore on Windows 10:

        https://www.windowscentral.com/how-use-system-restore-windows-10

        If your Acronis backup is quite recent, you could mount the backup image and then copy and paste the In.mbx and In.toc from the backup into the Eudora folder on your computer. The problem with this is that you will lose all In.mbx emails which you received after your made the Acronis backup.

        Another option is to manually try to fix your present 2GB In.mbx file.

        DO NOT DO ANY OF THE FOLLOWING UNLESS YOU HAVE SAVED A COPY OF YOUR EUDORA FOLDER TO ANOTHER LOCATION ON YOUR COMPUTER.

        All Eudora .MBX files actually nothing more than simple text files.

        I suggest that you download and install the trial version of EditPad Pro since it can handle files larger than 2GB. Here is the link to the download page on the program author’s web site:

        https://www.editpadpro.com/download.html#trial

        Each individual email in a Eudora .MBX file starts with the word “From” followed by a space and followed by “???@???”, followed by the date and time stamps. I deliberately did not copy and paste a sample line since it could mess up my Eudora inbox when I receive a copy of this reply.

        Have a look at the attached EditPad.jpg screen capture of EditPad Pro. In the bottom left search box in EditPad Pro, you will see what to search for. In Editpad Pro’s main window, you will see that I deleted the actual email contents for four emails, such that only the special line which is at the start of each of the four emails remains.

        Hopefully the following will work…

        First, open Eudora and make sure that automatically checking for email is TURNED OFF. Then close Eudora.

        1. Open another COPY of your 2GB In.mbx file in EditPad Pro. Don’t open the In.mbx which is in your saved copy of your Eudora folder, since we don’t want to mess with this saved copy.

        2. After opening a copy of your In.mbx file in EditPad, go to the end of the file by typing Ctrl+End. This will put the cursor at the end of the file.

        3. In the search box at the bottom left, type in what is shown in the attached EditPad.jpg screen capture.

        4. To the right of the search box, click on the little magnifying glass which has a LEFT arrow. If you hover your mouse over this before clicking on it, a small popup will appear which says “Find Previous (Shift+F3)”. Okay! When EditPad has found this search term, you will see that the search term is highlighted and that the cursor in the main window now is on this line. This line should be the first line of the last email which apparently messed up your In.mbx.

        5. Look at the position of the vertical scroll bar button to the right of EditPad’s main window. Hopefully, the scroll bar button will be way near the top, indicating that everything below this position is indeed junk.

        6. Type the Home key on your keyboard to place the cursor at the beginning of this line. This line, and everything which follows it, should be what needs to be deleted. This is done in the following step.

        7. Type Ctrl+Shift+End. This might take many seconds or possibly a couple of minutes for EditPad to process. Everything which needs to be deleted will be highlighted.

        8. Type Del on your keyboard. Again, this might take many seconds or possibly a couple of minutes for EditPad to process since we should be deleting well over 1GB of whatever is messed up. Simply wait for EditPad to finish deleting all of this junk stuff.

        9. Assuming that the above worked, save the edited file. Then copy this edited and saved In.mbx file to your Eudora folder.

        10. DELETE the In.toc file in your Eudora folder. This important to do. Why? Because when you start Eudora, you want Eudora to create a new table of contents for your newly edited and hopefully fixed In.mbx. Creating the new table of contents could take a while. Be patient and let Eudora do it.

        Do a rain dance, chant an incantation or two, and pray for a miracle. If a miracle has indeed occurred, then you should see that your Inbox in Eudora is now fine. If so, do NOT check for new email. Instead, exit Eudora, and then copy your Eudora folder to another location on your computer.

        11. Now, you need to reduce the size of your In.mbx by moving older emails to new mailbox files. Create a new mailbox called In_older.mbx, and then move a large chunk of your much older emails from your In.mbx to the In_older.mbx. Another option is to create mailboxes by year. For example, create a mailbox called In_2015.mbx and move all emails received in 2015 from your In.mbx to this In_2015.mbx, and do the same for other years. The idea is to make sure that you never ever again hit any of the limitations in Eudora. Obviously you would do the same for your Out.mbx and possibly for other mailboxes.

        FINAL SUGGESTIONS…

        I recommend that you download and install the free version of ViceVersa. ViceVersa is a file copying and mirroring program. You can use this really slick program to make backup copies of your Eudora and for other stuff which change on a daily basis. I manually run ViceVersa every day in order to make backups of the present state of Eudora and other specific data on my computer which changes every day. At the very least, you can use ViceVersa to back up your Eudora emails either once a day or even multiple times a day. I suggest that you first read about ViceVersa’s features and functionality. See:

        https://www.tgrmn.com/

        Attached is ViceVersa.jpg which shows a screen capture for how I am about to immediately use ViceVersa to back up my Eudora program folder. I use the paid-for Pro version. Worth every penny.

         

        EditPad

         

        ViceVersa

        Attachments:
        • #1855020 Reply

          Paul T
          AskWoody MVP

          Previous versions of files are saved when System Restore points are created

          This is not true.
          System Restore points save system information, not user files. Backup programs (like Acronis or Windows File History) backup user files – and system information if you want.

          cheers, Paul

          2 users thanked author for this post.
          • #1855612 Reply

            GoneToPlaid
            AskWoody Plus

            Yes, this IS true. I just tested it. I noted the most recent previous version of my Eudora folder. It is 3:36 AM this morning. I created a new System Restore point at 11:50 AM. After creating this new System Restore point, I now have an additional and newer previous version of my Eudora folder which is 11:50 AM.

            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #1856594 Reply

              Paul T
              AskWoody MVP

              Restore points are generated when you install a new app or driver, and when you create a restore point manually. Restoring won’t affect your personal files, but it will remove apps, drivers, and updates installed after the restore point was made.

              From this MS web page (bolding is mine).

              cheers, Paul

            • #1857927 Reply

              GoneToPlaid
              AskWoody Plus

              That is true that performing a System Restore does not affect your personal files — with some limitations which are beyond the scope of this topic. On the other hand, and as I explained and proved, System Restore is used to save previous versions of folders and files. Test it for yourself. Alternatively, have a look at what is stated in the attached screen capture for configuring System Protection (System Restore).

               

              System_Protection

              Attachments:
    • #1853921 Reply

      Paul T
      AskWoody MVP

      You do not need to perform a system restore, Acronis will allow you to restore individual files from your backup.

      If you can fire up Eudora, do so with the internet disconnected so no more emails are downloaded, then try deleting a swag of old emails.

      I suspect Woody’s reply just tipped you over the limit rather than did something bad.

      cheers, Paul

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1854473 Reply

      geekdom
      AskWoody Plus

      Please check to see if you actually have 2.0 million mail on the server.

      Group G{ot backup} Win7Pro · x64 · SP1 · i3-3220 · TestBeta
    • #1854549 Reply

      alexcris

      Paul T:  Thanks for voluminous help.  Acronis is not cooperating.  My last backup was 5/27 but that’s OK since I save emails on server.  They’ll come back.  I’ve been trying to go to Mount an Image on Acronis, but it ain’t there.  I’m muddling through and won’t give up.  I think I didn’t select backup sector by sector.  What fool am I.  (Is that a rant?)

      I’ll keep trying.  And, yes, I do have 2GB on two servers.

    • #1854588 Reply

      alexcris
      AskWoody Plus

      I got my Eudora back!  I paid Acronis for support and found a very easy way to restore my In.mx.  As I thought, though I recovered my In.mbx from 5/19, after restoration all subsequent emails downloaded.  Now I will take advantage of the wonderful links you offered for System Restore on Win10.  I wondered why on earth I only had one system restore point.  Now I know.  Thanks a million!  Paul T., you’re a wonder.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1855636 Reply

      alexcris
      AskWoody Plus

      Yes, this IS true. I just tested it. I noted the most recent previous version of my Eudora folder. It is 3:36 AM this morning. I created a new System Restore point at 11:50 AM. After creating this new System Restore point, I now have an additional and newer previous version of my Eudora folder which is 11:50 AM.

      So, GonetoPlaid, first it isn’t, then it is.  System Restore does change files!  I’m glad you did a trial, very helpful.  But as you said, Acronis is very easy to snatch a previous In.mbx before the trouble.  Unfortunately when I first tried doing it, it kept giving me backup version from 2 months ago!  So paying for support and insisting on the guy’s sticking with it, we were able to navigate to the most current backup on my external hard drive.  Whew!  Thanks again.

      • #1856153 Reply

        GoneToPlaid
        AskWoody Plus

        Hi alexcris,

        You are most welcome. I should teach you how to use Vice Versa to periodically back up your Eudora email folder to a separate location on your computer’s hard drive. I actually have several Eudora email folders — one for each of the various email accounts which I use. I use Vice Versa to back up my Eudora folders every single day. It is the last really quick thing which I do every evening before I go to bed.

        You “could” create new System Restore points every few days, but doing so would quickly fill up your computer’s hard drive with saved previous versions of files. It is far better to use Vice Versa to make daily backups of your Eudora folder.

        Yet teaching you this isn’t what really concerns me at the moment. Yesterday evening, suddenly Eudora was no longer able to check for and retrieve my emails. Most of my email accounts are for my web sites which are hosted on a web site hosting provider. My web site hosting provider uses cPanel for root access to the client areas of my web sites, and uses cPanel SSL certificates for all SSL activities. Well, yesterday cPanel pushed out new SSL certificates which require any email program to support TLS versions 1.1 or higher. The problem is that Eudora 7.1.0.9 (the last version of Eudora) only supports TLS version 1.0! Suddenly, I could no longer use Eudora to check for and download any emails.

        Aside from cPanel, other online email services are in the process of killing off TLS version 1.0 support since it is insecure. Very soon, TLS version 1.1 or TLS version 1.2 will be required.

        The above is a “heads up” for everyone who is using older email programs (such as Eudora) which only support TLS 1.0. If you use any email program which only supports TLS 1.0, very soon you might find that you can not connect to your email server.

        Alexcris, you might find that in the next couple of days, your Eudora will no longer work since Eudora only supports TLS 1.0. I found and have implemented a solution for my Eudora, which adds TLS 1.1 and TLS 1.2 support for Eudora, and replaces all of Eudora outdated and expired root security certificates with current and valid root security certificates.

        If you suddenly find that your Eudora stops working (can’t check for emails), then please immediately send me a PM about this. I will then post here (publicly) the instructions for updating Eudora so that Eudora supports TLS 1.1 and TLS 1.2, in order to get your Eudora working again.

        Another simple solution is to disable secure connections in Eudora. This is not recommended since anyone could read your emails (and your email password) while they are being transmitted.

        Best regards,

        –GTP

        Edited by moderator for content

        • This reply was modified 4 weeks, 1 day ago by
           GoneToPlaid.
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           Bluetrix.
        • This reply was modified 4 weeks, 1 day ago by
           Bluetrix.
        • This reply was modified 4 weeks, 1 day ago by
           Bluetrix.
        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1856244 Reply

      alexcris
      AskWoody Plus

      Oh brother.  I just checked and I have under ‘Secure Sockets When Sending’  I have ‘Never.’  That’s the only way I could use Eudora on my desktop, for both servers.  One of my servers is a little outfit in northern CA which was my very first dial-up connection.  They’ve been so great I have Comcast as one server but have all my emails coming and going with the old dial-up connection name, forwarded to and from Comcast.  And other server is Dodaddy which I’m fine with.  When I got my first pc, I built it myself and had a good friend help me get into Win95.  (He wrote programs for Microsoft.)  But he became dastardly politically so I stopped communicating with him and now have no one to bounce around computer stuff.  So your help has been a lifesaver.  I can no longer fool around till 3 or 4 am getting up to speed with Windows, etc.  Economy mitigates.

      I’m so sorry about your new Eudora issue!  I’m going to write to my original server owner and Godaddy and ask if they’re going to be pushing out new SSL Certificates. and whether TLS version 1.1 or TLS version 1.2 will be required, and when.  Just today, I sent myself an email and it took 4 hours to arrive!  Usually it’s a matter of seconds.  So this may indeed be a sign.  I sent 3 package out via usps priority online, and I’ve had only one confirmation, over an hour ago.  Life could become much more difficult.

      Perhaps, Paul, you should post here (publicly) the instructions for updating Eudora so that Eudora supports TLS 1.1 and TLS 1.2.

      A thousand thanks again!  And I think I sent a reply to you, but as Paul T.  I meant GoneToPlaid.

    • #1856309 Reply

      alexcris
      AskWoody Plus

      By the way, have you looked into Hermes – Eudora’s Next Generation?  It’s on kickstarter.  They have about $3400 so far.  They’re going to resurrect the popular Eudora eMail client as an open-source project compatible with modern security – re-named Hermes (legal reasons).

      I can’t live without Eudora!

    • #1856311 Reply

      alexcris
      AskWoody Plus

      Godaddy has no plans to change anything relating to email.  No requirement for TLS 1.1 and TLS 1.2.  And no new SSL’s.

    • #1856510 Reply

      Ah, Eudora! <sniff!> I ran it for 10+ years until a forced change of ISP/Email servers made it so that it would not play nice with their new system. After hours on the phone with Tech Support, we just could not make it work with their servers TLS was at the bottom of it.  Had to switch to Thunderbird 32 bit, and it was painful, but at least I have a supported (by my mail server host) program that still gets updated. My old Eudora was breaking down quite a lot, and I never found the corruption/problem/issue….so I just had to archive it.

      From what I see out there, one could do worse than T-Bird.

      But I feel your pain!

      Win7 Pro SP1 64-bit, Dell Latitude E6330, Intel CORE i5 "Ivy Bridge", Group "A/B [negative] :)", Multiple Air-Gapped backup drives in different locations, "Don't check for updates-Full Manual Mode."
      --
      "...All the people, all the time..." (Peter Ustinov ad-lib from "Logan's Run")

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1856543 Reply

      alexcris
      AskWoody Plus

      Thanks for your supportive response.  Eudora is fixed now for the time being.  It was great that I could essentially copy and paste the In.mbx from a few days before it failed, with Acronis True Image.  I’m sure there are more troubles to come but for now I’m so happy to have it back!  And I’ll look into Thunderbird.  My system is 64 bit, though, so maybe that’s another problem>

       

      • #1858058 Reply

        Eudora was the ONLY email program that I and my fellow geeks would run in our late 1990’s-2000’s Internet SIG; how I miss it’s ability to alter subject lines, and tell it just where to put attachments, which you can’t do in T-Bird. But 1st-level Tech support and I just-could-not-do-it, and I was pressed horribly for time, as I used in with business as well. We just could not get it to work; also, it was breaking down, and even restores from backups weren’t working. I remember the famous line from a movie, “You see? It is NOT perfect!”  🙂

        One CAN do a LOT worse than T-Bird.

        And welcome, alexcris, to the Island of Sanity.  This place has saved my bacon more times than once!

        (Oh, and talking to front-line tech support abroad IS like talking to pudding, or maybe a cast-iron rhinoceros! Fortunately, I rarely have to deal with my ISP, and my mail host is also my web host, is stateside, and has been around for decades and is still very good.)

        Win7 Pro SP1 64-bit, Dell Latitude E6330, Intel CORE i5 "Ivy Bridge", Group "A/B [negative] :)", Multiple Air-Gapped backup drives in different locations, "Don't check for updates-Full Manual Mode."
        --
        "...All the people, all the time..." (Peter Ustinov ad-lib from "Logan's Run")

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1856593 Reply

      Paul T
      AskWoody MVP

      My system is 64 bit, though, so maybe that’s another problem

      Nope, that isn’t an issue for either Eudora or Thunderbird, or any of your other programs.

      Stick with Eudora, keep an eye on the mailbox size and all will be well.

      cheers, Paul

    • #1856652 Reply

      artig
      AskWoody Plus

      I found on a forum:  “Eudora has a limit of 32767 messages in a single mailbox.”

      I have at least 2 mailboxes with more than 32K messages in each, but less than 64K. They are archive mailboxes, so don’t get used for anything except searching, but so far I haven’t noticed any anomalous behaviour due to these quantities.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #1859195 Reply

        GoneToPlaid
        AskWoody Plus

        You might want to break up any mailboxes with over 32K messages. Eudora could hiccup if you ever try to re-index those messages.

    • #1857031 Reply

      alexcris
      AskWoody Plus

      The mailboxes in Eudora that you have to keep trimmed are:  In.mbx, Out.mbx, and Trash.  If you exceed 32767 messages in one of those, you’re asking for trouble.

    • #1857047 Reply

      alexcris
      AskWoody Plus

      GoneToPlaid, are you going to post instructions for updating Eudora so that Eudora supports TLS 1.1 and TLS 1.2, as you stated?  I haven’t checked with Comcast to see if they’ll be requiring such.  Talking to even 2nd level tech is like talking to pudding.  But I’ll try.

      Thanks.

      • #1858210 Reply

        Paul T
        AskWoody MVP

        Eudora can’t be made to support more recent protocols, the software has to be re-written.

        If you want to use secure email connections, which you should, you will need to upgrade to Thunderbird.

        Warning: Current Thunderbird versions will not import Eudora mail. You need to use an old version of TB (V17.0.9), then upgrade. See this Thunderbird KB.
        As always, make sure you have a good backup of your email before you start.

        cheers, Paul

    • #1857113 Reply

      Geo
      AskWoody Plus

      What is the link to the original Eudora download?   There are a number of sites that advertise free download but I don’t trust them.

      • #1859215 Reply

        GoneToPlaid
        AskWoody Plus

        Send me a PM and I will create a Dropbox folder which contains the Eudora 7.1.0.9 final version. Alternatively, here are the CRC and MD5 checksums for it, in order to assure that nothing tampered with and that nothing else was bundled with it:

        Eudora_7.1.0.9.exe
        CRC-32: 4e7a8aa
        MD5: 8be29cc1e00a67b87a3d31583d46fd26

        Others here can confirm the above values. It is absolutely impossible to alter a file such that both the CRC-32 and MD5 checksums remain valid, since the calculations are completely different from one another. Either one result or the other result will always be incorrect. On the other hand, the security experts are always trying to create a single and supposedly undefeatable algorithm. Good luck on that one!

    • #1857451 Reply

      anonymous

      Go to https://filehippo.com/download_eudora/1663/ and in green link, download this link (16.61MB).  Open source developers have created “Eudora 8*” but it’s really Thunderbird.

      I would stick to Eudora 7.1.0.9.

    • #1858627 Reply

      GoneToPlaid
      AskWoody Plus

      Hi everyone,

      Eudora 7.1.0.9 only supports TLS 1.0. A utility called cPanel is used by many hosting providers, and cPanel has been pushing out new SSL certificates which only support TLS 1.1 and 1.2. This presents a problem for Eudora users.

      I found a solution for everyone who uses Eudora 7.1.0.9 paid version. There is a crowdfunded project, called the Hermes project, which is working on turning Eudora into a modern email program. See:

      https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1313324524/hermes-eudoras-next-generation/description

      The Hermes project is stalled, yet the company has managed to create four updated replacement files for Eudora to address the TLS issue. An additional requirement is that users need to install the 2015 version of vc_redist.x86.exe if a later version of Visual C++ Redistributable is not already installed. After doing this, all one has to do is to copy and replace four files in the Eudora folder with the four updated files. One of the files replaces all of Eudora’s expired root certificates with updated and valid root certificates. The other three files are for supporting TLS 1.1 and 1.2.

      See Zok T’s comment about all of the above on this web page, since ZoK T explains how Eudora users can fix Eudora to support TLS 1.1 and 1.2 Zok T provided very nice instructions. Zok T’s comment:

      blog.timeoff.org/rick/2015/09/09/revisiting-eudora-ssl-certificate-failures/#comment-53799

      Zok T provided a download link for the ZIP file which is the work of the Hermes project. Here is the link to SourceForge for the ZIP file created by the Hermes project:

      https://sourceforge.net/projects/hermesmail/

      I verified the files which are included in the ZIP file at virustotal.com before I installed the files. The files are safe and contain no malware, nor any links to malware websites, nor any embedded malicious code which tries to contact any malware websites when the files execute.

      It isn’t really necessary to make backup copies of the four files which are to be replaced by the four files in the ZIP file, yet it is always a good idea to do so. This is what Zok T explained how to do, before copying the four new files from the ZIP into the Eudora program folder. All of the files which get replaced are in your Eudora program folder and are not in any sub-folders.

      After you have installed (if necessary) the Microsoft x86 2015 Visual C++ Redistributable (vcredist.exe) and backed up and copied the four new files to your Eudora folder, you now need to make sure that Eudora is configured to use TLS. Please see the attached screen captures which are numbered 01 through 04. The 04 screen capture shows that Eudora is now using TLS 1.2. The settings shown in the screen captures also work for Gmail.

      Note that my hosting provider has a domain name error in one of their certificates. Eudora ignores that since the certificate itself is valid. I brought this issue to my hosting provider’s attention, and they are getting a new certificate with the correct embedded domain name.

      Best regards,

      –GTP

      • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 6 days ago by
         GoneToPlaid. Reason: Fixed a typo
      • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 6 days ago by
         GoneToPlaid. Reason: Added note that these settings also work for Gmail
      • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 6 days ago by
         GoneToPlaid. Reason: Provided a direct link to Zok T's comment
      • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 6 days ago by
         GoneToPlaid.
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    • #1858913 Reply

      mngerhold
      AskWoody Lounger

      System Restore points save system information, not user files.

      That is what I have always understood – but I think Windows 7 was different (which GtP may be using – his System Restore setting window is not the same as my W10 one).  I am also fairly certain that W10 system restore does not back up user files.  But part of the explanation for this discrepancy (between what we think we know and what GtP has experienced) is that Eudora and its data files are probably all stored under the C:\Program Files folder (or its x86 sister), and that may get copied in its entirety.  Another possibility is that GtP has turned on file history, although he would probably have said so – rather oddly, AIUI, FH is not turned on by default in W10.

      • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 6 days ago by
         mngerhold.
      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #1859224 Reply

        GoneToPlaid
        AskWoody Plus

        Windows 7 doesn’t have an option to separately turn on file history. The closest thing for file history is the setting one chooses in System Restore. See the attached screen capture for configuring System Restore. Things changed in Windows 8.x and Windows 10, both of which have a separate File History setting which can be turned on. Basically, what this setting does and unbeknownst to the user is to periodically create System Restore points. This is all done in the background, unlike in Windows 7 where one must manually create such System Restore points. This actually is one really slick thing which was implemented in Windows 8.x and Windows 10, yet one has to enable it. I suspect that it is disabled by default since it will eat up hard drive space.

        The upshot is that in Windows 7, one has to frequently create new System Restore points, at which time folder and file histories do get saved in the created System Restore points.

        • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 5 days ago by
           GoneToPlaid. Reason: Added information
        Attachments:
    • #1858952 Reply

      alexcris
      AskWoody Plus

      I wonder what’s the answer to whether System Restore updates “some” user files.  In Win10 Pro, Eudora saves its mailboxes in C:\Users\Name\AppData\Roaming\Qualcomm\Eudora.
      GTP has done a trial and found that it does!

      GTP has researched the kickstarter app, Hermes, in listing today at 11:24AM.  I don’t have time now to get into it, but will later on…or tomorrow.  Thanks!

    • #1858993 Reply

      mngerhold
      AskWoody Lounger

      Eudora saves its mailboxes in C:\Users\Name\AppData\Roaming\Qualcomm\Eudora.

      Looking more closely at GtP’s screen shots, I now see this – so I am still puzzled…

      • #1859331 Reply

        GoneToPlaid
        AskWoody Plus

        Actually, I chose to install Eudora on all of my Windows 7 computers into a folder which is named “C:\__\Eudora”. Where possible, all of my various program data which changes on a daily basis is saved in sub-folders under the “C:\__” folder so that daily I can use Vice Versa to mirror the changes to this single folder and all of its contents to a physically separate backup hard drive which is drive D:. My D: drive is protected by my antivirus program such that no new process which mysteriously launches can touch the contents on my D: drive, unless I specifically approve any new processes.

        I have three hard drives in my desktop computers. The C: hard drive always are 1TB hard drives so that I have plenty of room to save System Restore points for each computer’s OS. The additional two hard drives contain volumes of data which does not frequently change. I deliberately have System Restore and the Windows Indexing Service disabled on these addition two hard drives. Why? Two reasons. First is that malware loves to use the Windows Indexing Service to find files to attack or steal. Second is that malware loves to embed itself into System Restore points. If both System Restore and the Indexing Service are disabled on my data hard drives, then they have at least an order of magnitude chance of not being either infected or altered by malware.

        In particular, and given that the Windows Indexing Service by default only indexes specific locations on the C: hard drive, perhaps one will see why I deliberately choose to store data which changes daily on my C: hard drive within the C: hard drive’s folder which is named “C:\__”. Sometimes the best thing to defeat is Windows itself, if one wants to protect one’s data.

    • #1859329 Reply

      Paul T
      AskWoody MVP

      Looking more closely at GtP’s screen shots, I now see this – so I am still puzzled

      What GtP shows in post #1853868 is “Previous Versions”. This is a Windows 7 legacy sudo backup program that uses VSS to created snapshots. It is not System Restore.
      It’s also not a true backup program, just a convenient system for reverting to a previous version of a file if you make a mistake.

      To backup your Eudora mail you must use a backup program, like Acronis.

      cheers, Paul

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1859357 Reply

      GoneToPlaid
      AskWoody Plus

      What GtP shows in post #1853868 is “Previous Versions”. This is a Windows 7 legacy sudo backup program that uses VSS to created snapshots. It is not System Restore. It’s also not a true backup program, just a convenient system for reverting to a previous version of a file if you make a mistake. To backup your Eudora mail you must use a backup program, like Acronis. cheers, Paul

      Hi Paul,

      Actually, this is EXACTLY what is created by System Restore in Windows 7. And in Windows 7, these settings are only available under System Restore when one chooses to configure System Restore. You are correct that this is not a “true” backup program since all previous versions of folders and files do get saved in System Restore Points which can easily be either wiped out or altered by malware, or deleted if System Restore is not configured to use a significantly larger percentage of available hard drive space. The latter is why I have always built all of my Windows 7 computers with 1TB hard drives for the OS C: hard drive, such that I could configure System Restore to be allowed to use up to 40% of the hard drive capacity. This allows me to have many dozens of System Restore points, and allows me to have multiple Previous Versions of folders and files.

      You explicitly state that to backup Eudora email, “you must use a backup program, like Acronis.” This is inherently NOT true. For example, one could simply and easily use Windows Explorer to copy the Eudora program folder to an external hard drive. Alternatively and daily, I use Vice Versa Pro for this very purpose to backup both Eudora and all of my other data which changes every single day. Vice Versa Pro is quite useful for mirroring all changed files to either another hard drive location, or to inserted and mounted removable media which is removed immediately after the removable media has been updated with all changed files, after running Vice Versa Pro.

      I strongly suggest that you verify your statements before you post them.

      Best regards,

      –GTP

       

      • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 5 days ago by
         GoneToPlaid. Reason: Added information
      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #1859360 Reply

      Paul T
      AskWoody MVP

      For example, one could simply and easily use Windows Explorer to copy the Eudora program folder to an external hard drive.

      Therefore Explorer is a backup program. No issue there.

      cheers, Paul

    • #1859361 Reply

      Paul T
      AskWoody MVP

      Second is that malware loves to embed itself into System Restore points

      How? References / examples please.

      cheers, Paul

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #1859366 Reply

        GoneToPlaid
        AskWoody Plus

        You might want to Google “malware system restore” for starters?

        Moderator edited for offensive content.

        • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 5 days ago by
           satrow. Reason: Language
        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #1859503 Reply

        satrow
        AskWoody MVP

        System Restore can, and does, embed malware, depending where the original infection was running from.

        System Restore can also remove malware.

        All down to luck.

    Please follow the -Lounge Rules- no personal attacks, no swearing, and politics/religion are relegated to the Rants forum.

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