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  • Fairly easy local networking problem

    Posted on BATcher Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Home Forums Networking – routers, firewalls, network configuration Fairly easy local networking problem

    This topic contains 0 replies, has 0 voices, and was last updated by  BATcher 2 years, 5 months ago.

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    • #508264 Reply

      BATcher
      AskWoody_MVP

      On a LAN, from my Windows 7 Pro PC using Microsoft RDP I can remote-control a Windows server (WS2008 R2), which uses static IP addressing with a default gateway address of www.xxx.yyy.254 (a router).

      On the Windows server console, I change the default gateway to that of a second router, whose IP address is www.xxx.yyy.253.

      Now on my PC I can successfully PING the Windows server by name and by IP address BUT when trying to connect to it using RDP, it times out and will not connect. This happens when I try to connect using the server’s name or its IP address.

      What has gone wrong, and how is it correctable?

      BATcher
    • #1591892 Reply

      Paul T
      AskWoody MVP

      The default gateway is where your device sends packets for which it doesn’t have a direct route, e.g. need to be routed to a different subnet.
      It seems your second router doesn’t know about the network for your PC, or the server has bad route information.

      On the server run “route print” to see where it is sending packets for your PC network.
      Connect to router 2 and see what networks it knows about. Ditto for router 1.
      “Route print” on your PC as well.

      cheers, Paul

    • #1591977 Reply

      BATcher
      AskWoody_MVP

      Actually it’s considerably simpler than that!

      When I changed the server ethernet adapter’s default gateway I missed the “Set Network Location” window (hiding under an instance of Windows Explorer) which says “Select a location for the ‘Network n’ network”, and I could not connect to the server using RDP until I had selected ‘Work network’ on the server’s console.

      When moving from the use of one router/broadband line to another, I needed also to move 26 PCs from DHCP on the first router, to Static IP addressing, to DHCP on the second router/broadband line. (This I did using several features of NETSH in a rather neat BATch file on each PC). For the final operation I had to manually select ‘Work network’ for every single PC!

      As I understand it, the default gateway IP address on a PC defines which router (and thus which broadband line) handles internet traffic for that PC. For a period we had three routers/broadband lines on the same LAN!

      BATcher
      • #1591980 Reply

        Paul T
        AskWoody MVP

        As I understand it, the default gateway IP address on a PC defines which router (and thus which broadband line) handles internet traffic for that PC

        Nope, it’s just for “I don’t know where to send this stuff so I’ll use the default gateway”. You can specify a specific internet route via the proxy setting in your browser.

        Having 3 internet lines gives you a couple of options.
        1. Set routes manually per PC / network.
        2. Install a router to load share – my preferred option.

        cheers, Paul

      • #1592039 Reply

        Rick Corbett
        AskWoody_MVP

        When moving from the use of one router/broadband line to another, I needed also to move 26 PCs from DHCP on the first router, to Static IP addressing, to DHCP on the second router/broadband line. (This I did using several features of NETSH in a rather neat BATch file on each PC). For the final operation I had to manually select ‘Work network’ for every single PC!

        You should be able to set the network profile from within your BATch file… it’s just a change in the registry. Have a look at How to Set the Network Location Type in Windows 7 for more info.

        Hope this helps…

        • #1592092 Reply

          BATcher
          AskWoody_MVP

          Thanks, Rick – you have stimulated me to look at this!

          BATcher
    • #1591984 Reply

      BATcher
      AskWoody_MVP

      Although I don’t regard myself as a network expert, my usage of the default gateway setting appears to work as I have said!

      If it hadn’t, I would be out of a job…

      We don’t use any proxy settings, anywhere.

      BATcher
      • #1592038 Reply

        wavy
        AskWoody Plus

        BATcher

        “The trouble with quotes on the internet is that you can never know if they are genuine.”
        Abraham Lincoln

        🙂

        🍻

        Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
    • #1592005 Reply

      Paul T
      AskWoody MVP

      Basic networks are set up as you seem to have yours. Everyone / thing has full internet access via the default gateway.
      “Proper” networks are set up with no external access, then (some) users/machines are given internet access via a proxy / firewall.

      My background is in “proper” networks – in case you hadn’t guessed.

      cheers, Paul

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