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  • Firefox 83 now available

    Posted on Ascaris Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Home Forums AskWoody support Questions: Browsers and desktop software Firefox 83 now available

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      • #2312801 Reply
        Ascaris
        AskWoody_MVP

        I’m running Firefox 83 now (Linux, OpenSUSE edition of Firefox, though on KDE Neon), and it’s running fine… no issues noted at all. There usually are not any for me with new versions of Firefox (other than the stuff that Mozilla intended, which sometimes annoys me), but since some people are cautious about new versions of Firefox, I thought I would add my one data point. So far, so good!

        It’s supposed to be faster in a few areas than the previous version, and it feels pretty snappy, but I can’t tell if it’s perceptibly faster or not. No important features missing, so feels like a win on this one!

        Group "L" (KDE Neon Linux 5.20.4 User Edition)

        3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2312864 Reply
        mledman
        AskWoody Plus

        Running Firefox 83 on Windows 10 20h2.  So far no observed issues.

        Win 10 home - 20H2
        Attitude is a choice...Choose wisely

      • #2313004 Reply
        Charlie
        AskWoody Plus

        FF 83 comes with a new feature – HTTPS only, which is a good thing except many government websites still use HTTP.  Fortunately (or not) you can override the warning you get when you encounter the insecure HTTP websites still out there.

        This was not enabled by default. It has to be enabled in the Privacy/Security section of preferences (the last item now).

        Group L

        • This reply was modified 2 weeks, 1 day ago by Charlie.
        • #2313019 Reply
          Bundaburra
          AskWoody Plus

          With this new feature enabled, I have removed the add-on “HTTPS Everywhere” as it is no longer needed.

          Also with this new feature enabled, I visited the Microsoft Catalog to download something, and received this message:  “You’ve enabled HTTPS-Only Mode for enhanced security, and a HTTPS version of download.windowsupdate.com is not available.”

          Go figure.

          Windows 10 Pro 64 bit 20H2

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2313023 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        ? says:

        got ff 83 for 20 and 18 yesterday, thanks Ascaris. the 16.04 just came:

        Upgraded the following packages:
        firefox (82.0.3+build1-0ubuntu0.16.04.1) to 83.0+build2-0ubuntu0.16.04.3

        and i noticed two changes: control audio/video

        https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/kb/control-audio-or-video-playback-your-keyboard?as=u&utm_source=inproduct

        and the https only already mentioned:

        https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/kb/https-only-prefs?as=u&utm_source=inproduct

      • #2313783 Reply
        Charlie
        AskWoody Plus

        I was hoping it would take some time before FF 83 came out for Linux Mint but there it is in the Update Manager.  When it comes to updates, FF stands for Fast and Furious.  It seems like I just got done updating to 82.0.3!

        Group L

      • #2313794 Reply
        GoneToPlaid
        AskWoody Plus

        I am running FF 83 on my Win7 computers. No issues so far.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2313802 Reply
        DrBonzo
        AskWoody Plus

        FF 83.0 is running with no issues on 2 macOS Catalina, 3 Win 7, 2 Win 8.1, 1 Ununtu 18.04 LTS, and 3 Mint Cinnamon 19.2 computers.

      • #2314132 Reply
        Charlie
        AskWoody Plus

        Seems there’s always something, try typing something to search for in the address bar, then click on DuckDuckGo or Wikipedia.  I get a blue box (color may vary) with whatever I clicked on in it and it does nothing until I hit enter.  It then takes you to the alternate search engine.  I take this to mean:  “Do you really want to do this?”

        While I realize that some people may need this Nannying, to me it’s just one more minor annoyance that I don’t need.  Any way to get rid of it?  This happens on Win 7 (which accounts for the fact that there’s color).

        Group L

        • #2314214 Reply
          mledman
          AskWoody Plus

          Search using the address bar, for me, works as you describe.  However, using the search bar and choosing a search engine immediately displays results using the search engine of choice.  The option to add the search bar is at – settings, options, search.

          Win 10 home - 20H2
          Attitude is a choice...Choose wisely

          • #2314217 Reply
            Charlie
            AskWoody Plus

            Before FF 83 I didn’t need a separate Search Bar, I used the Address bar to do searches and it worked just like the Search Bar.  I would click on the desired search engine and it came up immediately.  It’s not a real big deal, I just wish they’d leave things alone that aren’t broken.

            Group L

            1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2314369 Reply
          Ascaris
          AskWoody_MVP

          I hadn’t seen this new “feature” of Firefox, as I have had the search bar enabled since I first moved from Mozilla Browser to Firefox back when it was brand new (Mozilla Browser had “Search from the URL bar”). Adding a distinct search bar was the new innovation then… now the innovation is getting rid of it again.

          I created a new profile to see what you meant. You’re right… it’s really awful. I don’t see how this is in any way an “improvement” as they claim.

          Fortunately (for now at least) you can fix it. Open about:config, then search for this pref:

          browser.urlbar.update2

          and set it to false.

          Mozilla has a habit of making their mistakes optional, and then in time removing the pref to turn them off, so be warned.

          I wish there was a Firefox fork that simply sought to undo all of Mozilla’s blunders, but they make so many that the workload of backporting all those fixes would be ever increasing. It’s not impossible, but it would take an ever-growing amount of effort.

          I can’t even remember how many times I’ve started a new version of Firefox only to discover that they’d taken out some bit that was important to me, and the justification for that removal was always (or nearly always) nonsense.

          Back when Firefox had the full-power addons, the mistakes could all be fixed, but now that Firefox has ditched their own addons scheme that could do anything the browser itself could (a defining feature of Firefox) in favor of Chrome addons, very often the Mozilla blunders can’t be fixed without diving into the Firefox code itself. It’s why I am preparing for the move to Vivaldi, whose UI and feature set keeps improving over time, while Firefox’s UI and feature set just gets worse and worse. If Google ever manages to get Chromium into a state that it’s ready for prime time, I will probably make the jump even if Firefox doesn’t get any worse than it now is.

          Group "L" (KDE Neon Linux 5.20.4 User Edition)

          2 users thanked author for this post.
          • #2314379 Reply
            cyberSAR
            AskWoody Plus

            I too have been considering Vivaldi and may try it this holiday season. I’ve been growing to despise firefox and have used it for so long. Makes me sad really.

            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #2314399 Reply
              Ascaris
              AskWoody_MVP

              Agreed. The first browser I used was Netscape 2, I believe. I had Windows 95 OSR2, which came with a very early version of IE, which at the time I had no aversion to. I liked Windows 95 and had no animosity toward Microsoft, so I tried IE, but didn’t like it as much as Netscape.

              I kept using Netscape up through version 4.7, and by then the browser wars were in full effect. Ever since the PC magazines announced that Windows 98 was going to graft the browser UI onto the Windows Explorer, which at the time they were describing as “view your PC’s files as a web page,” I had become disgusted with Microsoft.

              It was soon evident why MS did that, when the various governments came down on Microsoft for antitrust violations. The governments wanted MS to offer Windows without IE, but MS was able to claim that it was embedded into the OS too deeply and that it could not be removed. It was a lie, of course, but the governments of the world took the bait, and MS was not required to remove IE.

              I upgraded to Windows 98 SE at some point, and I used an aftermarket program called Mozilla’s Revenge to forcibly remove IE. I had to replace the Windows Explorer with the one from 95 OSR2, which the Mozilla’s Revenge dev could not distribute, obviously. I still had the CD for 95 OSR2, fortunately.

              If some guy from out in the community was able to remove IE, certainly it would have been trivial for MS to do so, but they committed perjury and said it could not be done (I believe it was Gates himself that did it).

              I developed a solid contempt for IE at that point, and I vowed to never use it, and I never did, except for Windows Updates (XP required it for manual updating).

              Netscape was in trouble, and they took the shocking step (at that time) of open-sourcing the code for Netscape 6, a work in progress that was much behind schedule as the Netscape devs had given in to the programmer’s ever-present desire to throw out the current code and start over, and while they did, the crashy Netscape 4 was the most recent version.

              Mozilla.org was formed to continue to develop the code, with the Netscape developers contributing to the project and continuing to develop their branded Netscape version (very much the same as how Google develops Chromium as the base of their Chrome branded version). I had tried Netscape 6 and found it promising, with levels of UI customization that were far beyond IE or Netscape 4, but it was buggy. Mozilla 1.0 was to be the unbranded version of Netscape 7, and I moved to Mozilla when it was available.

              At some point in there I moved to Windows XP, with IE 6, the browser that was taking the world by storm. I didn’t see what the fuss was about. There was no way I would use it for anything after what Microsoft had done to Netscape, but I do love to test things and see how they compare, and I didn’t see what the fuss was about. Mozilla was clearly better to me.

              I kept using Mozilla, including its email client and basic web page editor, and I thought it was just fantastic. I was very enthusiastic about Mozilla and evangelized it at every opportunity, and I got several people to try it and switch away from IE. I was active in several Mozilla web sites and often downloaded and installed the daily builds to see how it was going (I remember it took an hour to download the 10MB installer on my 56k modem).

              At some point, the developers of Mozilla announced an experimental project called Phoenix, as in “rising from the ashes of Netscape.” They soon found that some other company claimed the name (Phoenix BIOS?), so they changed it to Firebird (and the email client was to become Thunderbird, while the native Mac version of something or other was Camino. Someone may have had a car obsession!)

              Firebird was already taken by some database company, so it became Firefox (surprisingly, the studio that had made a movie by the same name years prior didn’t step forward).

              I remember watching as each 0.1, 0.2, 0.3 release came along, and I installed each one to observe the progress. It was quite good by the time it got to 1.0, though at that time I had no interest in switching from Mozilla (which is what the browser in the suite was called). I tried them back to back, and I saw no difference in the way they rendered or in the speed with which they operated, but Firefox had that neat customization, which really appealed to me, even though I just set it up to look like Mozilla.

              Thunderbird had been developed in parallel with Firefox, with each being a standalone version of its corresponding version in the suite. I moved to the independent versions not long after they were released, mainly because of how the customization appealed to me.

              I’ve been using them both ever since. I never tried Chrome proper, and I only ever tried Chromium in the post-Quantum era, but even then I found it seriously lacking as I had with IE years ago. Even when Firefox was at its slow, crashy, nadir, it never even crossed my mind to try anything other than Firefox or its derivatives, like Pale Moon and Waterfox.

              I still haven’t made the move away from Firefox and its kin, but I have not had the enthusiasm for Firefox that I once did in a long time. Chrome changed everything… Mozilla lost its mojo, and began its current long, sad decline as it betrayed its legacy as would-be giant slayer and became a whimpering Chrome also-ran. Their market share has declined ever since, but many years later, they still persist in the same failed strategy, with less market share now (as a nearly 20 year old product with a storied past) than Chromium Edge that hasn’t even been here for a year.

              But still they go, making Firefox’s UI more and more inane with each passing release. It’s kind of like the situation with Windows 10, where the back-end stuff has never been better, but it’s buried beneath a layer of front-end idiocy. Things like this ridiculous new search “feature” are just par for the course with Firefox… something like this comes along nearly every release, prompting scores of people to start asking “how do I get rid of this new ‘feature?’ or ‘how do I get back my favorite feature that has been removed?’ every time.

              Mozilla does not listen to customer feedback anymore. I looked into the discussion over every one of the Mozilla blunders that bothered me, and in every case, people eloquently made the same case I would have if I would have known what they were planning in advance, and Mozilla always, in essence, told them to sit down and shut up. Once Mozilla gets it in its collective head to take a given action, they won’t listen to anything other than praise (again, a lot like how Microsoft only listens to insiders who love whatever MS does).

              Vivaldi is the best bet now, I think. They’re closer to the spirit of what Mozilla used to be than the actual Mozilla now is, and while Chrome never had very many options and Firefox cuts off the options it has, Vivaldi continues to add them. The main issue I have now is that even after all these years Chromium has been around, it (and all of its descendants, on both Windows and Linux) still stutters and judders so badly when scrolling on my laptops that it’s intolerable. With a standalone mouse, it’s fine, but with the touchpad, it’s just horrendous, and no amount of tweaking flags and using extensions to try to smooth it out has worked.

              So, I still use Firefox, as it’s still the best choice given Chromium’s limitations, but I don’t expect that to be the case forever. One day I think Firefox will lop off the ability to use userChrome.css, and that will be it for me. Without that, Firefox’s UI is too terrible for me to tolerate. So is Chromium’s, but that’s why I am glad there’s Vivaldi.

              Group "L" (KDE Neon Linux 5.20.4 User Edition)

              1 user thanked author for this post.
              • #2314400 Reply
                cyberSAR
                AskWoody Plus

                I pretty much have done the same as you. I’m really not a fan of Chromium but may make the switch. Only issue I see with Vivaldi is almost too many options/features. I want a clean, fast, simple and stable browser. That is all. If I want to take notes, screen grabs or whatever I have programs to do so. I realize thes features appeal to others and I guess I’m just an old fart who hates change.

                Give me my old Netscape browser back!

                Considered going back to Palemoon but it’s been awhile and I remember having issues with certain websites way back when.

      • #2314230 Reply
        Bundaburra
        AskWoody Plus

        Type a search term into the search bar.  Nothing happens until Enter is pressed, then your default search engine immediately displays the results.

        Type a search term into the address bar.  A box opens, showing available search engines.  Just hit Enter, and it will display the results using your default search engine.  Or, click on another search engine – the results will then display using that search engine.

        Change the default search engine in Options > Search > Default search engine.  To add a new search engine, there’s an add-on called “Add custom search engine”.  (Leave it disabled unless you want to use it.)

        Windows 10 Pro 64 bit 20H2

        • #2314398 Reply
          Charlie
          AskWoody Plus

          I have Google as my default search engine.  I also have DuckDuckGo and Wikipedia as alternate search engines and they are where the problem is with the little “confirmation” box appearing.  This happens using the Address Bar to Search, I don’t have a separate Search Bar by choice.

          Group L

      • #2314351 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        ? says:

        i just found this on FF 83:

        https://www.ghacks.net/2020/11/22/how-to-disable-sponsored-top-sites-in-the-firefox-web-browser/

        and remove amazon from address bar suggestions:

        https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/questions/1285677

        also, anyone know how to remove amazon from:

        browser.newtabpage.activity-stream.improvesearch.topSiteSearchShortcuts.searchEngines (google,amazon) currently?

        also:

        https://www.ghacks.net/2020/11/17/here-is-what-is-new-and-changed-in-firefox-83-0/

      • #2314382 Reply
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        I too have been considering Vivaldi and may try it this holiday season. I’ve been growing to despise firefox and have used it for so long. Makes me sad really.

        Vivaldi Mail, Feed Reader and Calendar can now be tested

        1 user thanked author for this post.
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