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  • First time cloning to move to new harddrive.. is this right??

    Home Forums AskWoody support Windows Windows 7 Questions: Windows 7 First time cloning to move to new harddrive.. is this right??

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      • #2279255 Reply
        Guest
        AskWoody Lounger

        I have never tried this before but I want to clone my current harddrive, which I am concerned is far too old, to a new one. I have the new harddrive and the USB to SATA enclosure ready to go. Is the following the general idea and self explanatory from there?

        -Connect the new harddrive to USB.

        -Use Macrium Free, EaseUS Free or Acronis Free (not sure which is best) to clone current W7 laptop harddrive to the new harddrive connect to USB following whatever the program says to do (never done this before).

        -Reboot into the BIOS and have it boot to the new harddrive connected to USB to make sure it boots into the new cloned harddrive and everything looks okay.

        -Shut the computer down and remove the old laptop harddrive and install the new harddrive.

        -Boot back up and everything should be exactly the same except I would have the new harddrive with lots of life left.

        Is it that simple and foolproof? I found this guide.. https://www.pcmag.com/how-to/how-to-clone-a-hard-drive

        Thank you.

      • #2279308 Reply
        Paul T
        AskWoody MVP

        Use Aomei Backupper free to clone.
        Make sure you align the partition on the SSD.
        Take the old disk out and put the SSD in. Don’t attempt to boot from the external disk, it may not go well.
        Check TRIM is working.
        Enjoy!

        cheers, Paul

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2279378 Reply
        Guest
        AskWoody Lounger

        Correct. I am cloning to a new harddrive, not SSD, from an internal W7 laptop harddrive. The new harddrive is connected to USB using a USB to SATA enclosure.

        I ended up trying just now using Macrium Reflect Free. I am a slow learner and get intimitated and overwhelmed easily but I think I did everything correctly as I was able to follow it well enough. Just installed the program and had the harddrive already connect with the on/off switch on the enclosure set to on. When the program opened it automatically had everything recognized and I just had to select clone and follow the prompts. But, unfortunately, it stopped not long into the process saying Clone Failed = Error 9 so it wasn’t as simple as I had hoped.

        Doing a search, from what I can tell, it says to run chkdsk as there is something wrong with my original laptop harddrive. I have never used that program before so now I am even further out of my comfort zone expecting I will end ruining something on the original laptop harddrive before I can clone it. I was hoping this was going to go well.

        • #2279383 Reply
          Alex5723
          AskWoody Plus

          Run chkdsk on the W7 HD.
          If errors were found, run chkdsk /f /r
          After error were fixed, Create full image of your drive with Macrium Reflect (no clone).
          Create a rescue USB thumb drive with Macrium Reflect.
          Replace the old HD with the new HD in the PC.
          Boot from the rescue USB thumb.
          Restore from image created.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2279413 Reply
          Elly
          AskWoody MVP

          This can end well…

          As a non-techy, I first learned about chkdsk through one of Woody’s books… where it is introduced as a tool for disk maintenance. It may reassure you that this is a Windows tool designed to detect errors… then it waits for you to approve making any repairs… and I’ve never seen any problems after running it and applying the repairs.

          You should run it, whether or not you go on with your original goal of cloning your drive. It detects problems with the hard drive, moves data to working sectors, when it can, and marks bad sectors, so they won’t be used in the future… and you don’t want your data to be placed where it can become corrupted.

          Maybe I’m not explaining it well, but running this will not mess up your system, and can fix/prevent data from being corrupted.

          I found this How-To at How-To-Geek that gives illustrated instructions… and more details about when and why to run it.

          Actually, although frustrating when trying to achieve a working clone, it is good you got the heads up to run some fixes, before they evolve into something bigger.

          Non-techy Win 10 Pro and Linux Mint experimenter

          2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2279424 Reply
        Guest
        AskWoody Lounger

        Thank you for all the help and hand holding. It is appreciated.

        I went ahead and ran chkdsk before Alex5723 response (I didn’t think someone would post so quickly and wanted to try and get this done today). First I ran it in Windows with nothing found and then a second time using chkdsk /r as I saw that mentioned in an article on how to use before the responses. When it rebooted and ran it completed saying there was one bad cluster fixed (the results went by so quickly that I didn’t see anything more than that and I can’t find a log file).

        It booted back up to Windows okay (obviously as I only have the one computer). I have run a Western Digital Data Lifeguard and that fails even after chkdsk. I have yet to try Macrium again as I have run out of time for today.

        Is cloning no longer an option? I don’t have a USB thumb drive and it would take a week or so to get one and I would rather get this done before then. I only bought the new harddrive and enclosure as I thought the cloning was the way to go and be smooth. Going the image route and having to create a bootable thumb drive to boot and restore adds even more that I don’t know how to do so I would still prefer to clone if I can make it work.

        I’ll try to clone again tomorrow and report back (hopefully).

        Thanks again.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2279492 Reply
        Paul T
        AskWoody MVP

        Sorry, I assume SSD when anyone says new these days (why would use a new spinner?).

        Clone is the correct method. Easy and quick.
        Disk manufacturers provide a utility to clone to a new disk, or you can use a free 3rd party app.

        If errors were found, run chkdsk /f /r

        Do not use the /r switch, it just takes (a lot of) time for no gain.
        Note: Your disk reported an error during the check. This indicates the disk is not well and needs replacing (modern disks do not report errors unless they are sick, errors are handled internally via ECC and cluster re-allocation).

        cheers, Paul

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2279983 Reply
        Guest
        AskWoody Lounger

        I figured out where the chkdsk logs go so I am including what I think is the important info below. I have run it a few times now. Only once using /r switch, before Paul T recommended not doing so, and the rest using /f. I have tried doing the clone a couple more times after chkdsk but it always fails with error code 9 read failed 121 semaphore timeout or 1117 i/o error on source disk.

        /r (first run)

        2451 large file records processed. 0 bad file records processed. 0 EA records processed. 43 reparse records processed.
        Cleaning up 2331 unused index entries from index $SII of file 0x9.
        Cleaning up 2331 unused index entries from index $SDH of file 0x9
        Read failure with status 0xc00000b5 at offset 0xe307d000 for 0x10000 bytes.
        Read failure with status 0xc00000b5 at offset 0xe307e000 for 0x1000 bytes.
        Windows replaced bad clusters in file 287947 of name \Windows\winsxs\AM1DB3~1.19~\ieproxy.dll.
        Adding 1 bad clusters to the Bad Clusters File.
        Correcting errors in the Volume Bitmap.
        Windows has made corrections to the file system.
        4 KB in bad sectors.

        /f (second run)

        Cleaning up 7 unused index entries from index $SII of file 0x9.
        Cleaning up 7 unused index entries from index $SDH of file 0x9.
        Windows has checked the file system and found no problems.

        /f (third run)

        Cleaning up 17 unused index entries from index $SII of file 0x9.
        Cleaning up 17 unused index entries from index $SDH of file 0x9.
        Windows has checked the file system and found no problems.

        Is there something else I can do other than the go image route over clone from Alex5723? Cloning would be easier for me if possible. I just do not know how to get Macrium to complete it. I see an option to ignore bad sectors. Could that be a possibility since whatever the issue is doesn’t affect the computer from running so far? So just clone it ignoring the bad cluster/sector which would allow me to keep everything intact on the new harddrive which should work the same since I haven’t had any issues with wherever that error is located yet.

      • #2280281 Reply
        Paul T
        AskWoody MVP

        Windows replaced bad clusters in file 287947 of name

        Your disk is not well and needs replacing.

        As clone is not working you should attempt to backup your files before you do anything else.

        Do you have license information for all your software, including the Windows license key? You may need it.

        Do you have / can you borrow another disk for the file backup?

        Once you have a file backup you should attempt an image backup. Even one with skipped files will allow you to restore to the new disk with all/most configuration information (licenses) saved.

        cheers, Paul

        p.s. the best way to test your disk is in good condition is to back it up regularly.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2280302 Reply
        bbearren
        AskWoody MVP

        Your disk is not well and needs replacing.

        That is the basic purpose of the OP.

        I want to clone my current harddrive, which I am concerned is far too old, to a new one.

        I see an option to ignore bad sectors. Could that be a possibility since whatever the issue is doesn’t affect the computer from running so far?

        I would definitely give that option a try.  Most imaging/cloning software will choke on bad sectors and refuse to complete.  That makes sense, since a bad clone would likely be blamed on the cloning software, and they have a reputation to protect.

        But offering to ignore bad sectors implies that you are aware of the bad sectors, and you’ll blame your old drive rather than blame the software.

        As for chkdsk, you can use it on a brand new disk if you wish.  As for switches, /r implies /f, so you only need to use chkdsk /r.  I never run chkdsk without /r, as that, for me, is a waste of time.  If there are bad sectors, I’d just as soon have chkdsk go ahead and do the repairs in a single run rather than run it twice.  If there are no bad sectors, chkdsk is not going to try to fix something that isn’t broken.  It’ll just give your drive a clean bill of health.

        Create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates, in case you need to start over!
        "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns
        "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

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      • #2280325 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        Clonezilla has always produced perfect clones for me, the popular GUI based utilities usually have but not always.  Clonezilla’s text based interface hints at the task’s simplicity with easy to follow steps.

        Home page:

        https://clonezilla.org/

        Use this version (bottom of home page, READ the home page first):

        https://clonezilla.org/clonezilla-live.php

        Making a CD will allow you use the program again without tying up a USB drive with it but a USB stick can be used.   Stepping through the default cloning options is relatively easy and the cloning process itself is fast.

        Actually what you’re trying to do is very simple to someone familiar with how disks work but most of us rarely do anything beside read and write and moving into an area with ambiguous terminology that’s rarely explained well can be daunting.

        Definitely back up the files you want especially since your HD has some issues and if it begins dying fast may not create a usable clone.  If so, a Win ISO is the cleanest OS install method, faster than using your OS disk and spending hours updating.

        If you want to stay with Win 7, I think this still works, not certain:

        https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windows7

        Good luck!

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2280537 Reply
        Guest
        AskWoody Lounger

        This is where I am at now. I gave up on cloning with Macrium as it would not work even with ignore bad sectors. I tried an image (stayed with Macrium for now just because I was already using it) and that worked, didn’t have to ignore bad sectors either, so I have that on the new harddrive now. I left all settings at default so am I supposed to verify the image somehow or should it definitely work?

        Took a bit to figure that out as Macrium would not recognize the new harddrive properly because it started the clone on it and I couldn’t figure out how to get it to just overwrite the unfinished clone. Ended up learning how to delete the partition and then re-create it via diskmgmt.msc.

        Anyway, I have the image finished as that had no problems but I am confused on what/how to do the bootable rescue media. With an image versus a clone, that is required correct? I can’t just take out the old harddrive and put in the new harddrive and boot up to the image?

        On the create bootable media Macrium section it lists a few things I don’t understand. It says Rescue Media Settings Windows RE 3.1 64Bit WIM Build Not Found Click Build to Update. Do I do that?

        Then it asks me to select device with the following options.

        Windows Boot Menu (add/change the Boot Menu for selected Windows PE version).
        CD/DVD Burner which I can’t use (no discs to use and would rather buy a USB Flash Drive)
        ISO File
        Then it gives the option of the new harddrive.

        I don’t want to go the CD/DVD route due to having to buy discs as I would rather just buy a USB Flash Drive over that. I can’t select the new harddrive with the image on it right? It has to be on anything but that? That leaves Windows Boot Menu (no idea what that means) or ISO which would go on a new unused USB Flash drive right?

        Finally, it has an option of selecting no boot menu or add boot menu Windows RE 3.1 64Bit.

        I guess my big questions are where it says Rescue Media Settings Windows RE 3.1 64Bit WIM Build Not Found Click Build to Update. What does that mean and do I need to click build to update. And then whether I can use the new harddrive as the device to save the rescue media to (I don’t think so but that would be easiest if it could so I don’t have to get a USB Flash Drive)? If not, ISO or the Windows Boot Menu (add/change the Boot Menu for selected Windows PE version) option?

        Thank you so much.

      • #2280540 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        Don’t normally use macrium, I use acronis, but after restoring the image to new hdd unplug the old drive and it should boot to the new one. Acronis has an option to copy disk signature so you’d want to use that to keep all your licensing intact.

      • #2280616 Reply
        Paul T
        AskWoody MVP

        I am confused on what/how to do the bootable rescue media

        You need a 3rd disk / big USB stick to be able to restore the image to your new disk.

        1. Create the MR rescue disk on the 3rd disk.
        2. Create an image backup on the 3rd disk.
        3. Attempt to boot from the 3rd disk. (Hold Shift down and click Restart)
        4. If boot is successful, shutdown and swap the old and new disks.
        5. Boot from the 3rd disk.
        6. Restore the image from the 3rd disk to the new disk.
        7. Shutdown and remove the 3rd disk. Reboot. Hold breath.  🙂

        cheers, Paul

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      • #2280770 Reply
        Guest
        AskWoody Lounger

        I am confused on what/how to do the bootable rescue media

        You need a 3rd disk / big USB stick to be able to restore the image to your new disk.

        1. Create the MR rescue disk on the 3rd disk.
        2. Create an image backup on the 3rd disk.
        3. Attempt to boot from the 3rd disk. (Hold Shift down and click Restart)
        4. If boot is successful, shutdown and swap the old and new disks.
        5. Boot from the 3rd disk.
        6. Restore the image from the 3rd disk to the new disk.
        7. Shutdown and remove the 3rd disk. Reboot. Hold breath.  🙂

        cheers, Paul

        I guess I misunderstood this process this whole time as I thought I was supposed to save the image, same as when I was trying to do the clone, to the new harddrive.  1 harddrive being the currently installed old laptop harddrive.  2 being the new harddrive connected to the USB to SATA enclosure that I saved the image on.  3 being the USB Flash Drive I had to buy to create the rescue media to.

        That wasn’t correct?  I needed to save both the image and the rescue media to a third harddrive which I boot to and then it transfers the image from that third drive to the newly installed new harddrive (#2 which replaces the original old #1 drive)?   The image is much larger than a USB Flash drive so that would mean having to purchase 2 new harddrives rather than the one I did?

        I am even more confused then when I started.

      • #2280824 Reply
        Elly
        AskWoody MVP

        I’ve been following this… and I’m confused as well.

        If I have this right, you have:

        1) Determined there is a problem with Disk 1 that has prevented you from being able to clone to a second disk
        2) You have been successful in creating a disk image, so all your data is safe (good news)… but the disk image is not “bootable”.
        3) You are using Macrium Reflect Free and it is the paid version that has Redeploy (the easy way to move to a new disk).
        4) You want to end up using Disk 2 as the working hard drive.

        I’m hesitant that another voice may confuse things more… but there needs to be clarity when it comes to instructions… and I’ll do my best to help you clarify things. These are questions…

        5) Have you recovered license information for all of your software? If not, try NirSoft. This is in case your existing hard drive fails before you have a working new one…
        6) Regarding your image… which did you do?

        MR-Image-to-Restore-Windows

        Non-techy Win 10 Pro and Linux Mint experimenter

        Attachments:
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      • #2280862 Reply
        Guest
        AskWoody Lounger

        I’ve been following this… and I’m confused as well.

        If I have this right, you have:

        1) Determined there is a problem with Disk 1 that has prevented you from being able to clone to a second disk
        2) You have been successful in creating a disk image, so all your data is safe (good news)… but the disk image is not “bootable”.
        3) You are using Macrium Reflect Free and it is the paid version that has Redeploy (the easy way to move to a new disk).
        4) You want to end up using Disk 2 as the working hard drive.

        I’m hesitant that another voice may confuse things more… but there needs to be clarity when it comes to instructions… and I’ll do my best to help you clarify things. These are questions…

        5) Have you recovered license information for all of your software? If not, try NirSoft. This is in case your existing hard drive fails before you have a working new one…
        6) Regarding your image… which did you do?

        MR-Image-to-Restore-Windows

        Question 1-4 is correct.  Before this began I purchased the new harddrive and USB to SATA enclosure largely inspired by this article.  https://www.pcmag.com/how-to/how-to-clone-a-hard-drive

        I have been using Macrium Free.  I couldn’t get clone to work.  Imaging the current, old, internal laptop harddrive worked with no issue.  I saved that to the newly purchased harddrive using the USB to SATA enclosure.  I want to install the new harddrive internally replacing the old one.  Based on the article, I thought I could just clone, or now, image the old to the new and then remove the old and install the new and everything would be exactly as it is now.

        Question 5.  I thought cloning or even imaging my current harddrive meant everything would be identical once on the new harddrive and using that.  I was not aware that I would need to worry about any reinstalling, licenses and what not.  Honestly, the article made me think I was just going to be able to clone everything from the old to new drive, and other than it being on a new drive versus the old, nothing else was needed.

        Question 6.  There was actually another option in Macrium that I used both during the cloning and imaging.  When Macrium opens it automatically selects the current active disk and partitions on its home page and right under those it offers a choice to clone this disk or image this disk.  I used those rather than the attached screenshot options on the left.  But, that said, I just confirmed that the option in your screenshot that says “image selected disks on this computer” is identical to the one I used that said “image this disk”.  That automatically selects my current old internal laptop harddrive with all partitions selected.  I then just followed the prompts and selected the new harddrive as the destination for the image.

        I have the intended complete image of my current old internal laptop harddrive but it is currently saved on the new harddrive that I intended to install in the laptop, replacing the old one.  The issue, since it is an image rather than the hoped for clone, I have to boot to something else before I can restore the image.  The question is whether I am allowed to have that image saved on the new harddrive I want to install into the laptop, replacing the current old one, and use a USB Flash drive with bootable rescue media on it and that will restore the image on the new harddrive.  Or, if I need to have both the saved image AND the bootable rescue media on the same third drive in order for that third drive to then restore the image to the second new harddrive that I purchased to install internally in the laptop replacing its current old harddrive.

         

      • #2280906 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        Although “Paul T” wrote SSD instead of hardrive in the 1st reply above, those instructions are largely correct except for the last line – TRIM is a SSD thing, not relevant to hardrives.

        I use AOMEI Partition Assistant, not AOMEI Backupper as “Paul T” suggested, but both are by the same company so probably both include the same cloning software behind different user interfaces. See https://www.diskpart.com/help/clone-hard-disk.html for instructions and a download link. I use an old version 5.6.3, so I have no experience of the current version.

        Macrium Reflect is a complex program and may perform checks before attempting cloning which AOMEI (or another program) may not?  There are other similar partition assistant programs such as EaseUS and Minitool, but AOMEI (5.6.3 at least) has always worked for me.

        BTW: I used EaseUS until switching to AOMEI about 5 years ago. Although EaseUS did largely copy to the destination disk, after swapping the disk drives over, I sometimes had to boot from the Windows 7 Recovery program and let it fix things in order to get the copy disk to boot up. I have never had this extra complication with the AOMEI tool (which was why I switched from EaseUS). Again I do not know if the current EaseUS partition tool has the same occasional limitation.

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      • #2280937 Reply
        Elly
        AskWoody MVP

        You know, I did this, about 2-3 years ago… and have been hoping that reviewing Macrium support would enlighten me about exactly how I managed this…

        I think that you really need to make an image to specifically include the system files, as this option chooses all the partitions required to boot Windows. “This may include hidden system partitions that are essential for Windows to start and run.” A regular image doesn’t say it includes those anywhere I’ve looked… it may be that the rescue media includes those, but I can’t say for sure…

        There are other backup/cloning utilities, but having gotten this far, you may just want to go with what you have now. I think that is where things got confusing. It is nice to have options… but if they get confusing, its nicer to go step by step with one option… and that is why I’d just follow Paul T’s instructions

        I would not have the image you are restoring from on disk 2, because restoring the system drives will require reformatting the drive… and thus wiping out the image.

        Non-techy Win 10 Pro and Linux Mint experimenter

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      • #2280950 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        If you don’t have another drive to store an image, and cloning fails with macrium, try another program. If they all fail even with ignore bad sectors, then purchase a drive to create an image and give it a go. If all else fails, install your drive, do a fresh install and copy your backed up data.

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      • #2280956 Reply
        bbearren
        AskWoody MVP

        Macrium Reflect Free Tutorial.

        I’ve used drive imaging to replace old/damaged HDD’s a number of times.  I have never used cloning.

        You must have a bootable rescue disc/USB stick that can launch the imaging software.  The imaging software will have the available options to create rescue media.  (by “disc” I mean optical disc, CD or DVD)

        You must restore your drive image to a separate HDD.

        That means you need two HDD’s, one to hold the drive image, another to which you can restore that drive image, and you need a rescue disc/USB stick to boot and launch the imaging software to restore the image.

        You said you already have the image file, you need another HDD.  The newest, blank HDD needs to be installed in the laptop.  Boot the USB stick, restore the drive image from the external drive to the newest drive in the laptop.  Shutdown, remove the rescue media, start up.

        Create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates, in case you need to start over!
        "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns
        "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

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      • #2280957 Reply
        Paul T
        AskWoody MVP

        Q. I have one new disk and want to use it to replace my existing disk.

        A. Use a cloning program. If one doesn’t work try another.
        The manufacturer of the new disk will probably have a program to clone to the new disk, as well as the ones suggested here.

        Q. I currently make image backups of my PC to an external disk. I want to put a new disk in my PC.

        A. Buy a new disk and install it. Boot from your rescue media. Restore the image to the new disk.

        cheers, Paul

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      • #2280972 Reply
        DavidForrest57
        AskWoody Lounger

        Last year I cloned my HDD to a new Crucial SSD. I followed their instructions using Acronis True Image for Crucial, but the cloning failed when I attempted this via Windows 7 Pro. When I installed the new drive the PC went into an endless cycle of booting, loading drivers and rebooting.

        Crucial advised me to do the cloning via the rescue CD that I had made when I installed the True Image for Crucial program; that way the operating system to be cloned is shut down. That worked for me.

        So one possibility is to boot into the rescue medium of whatever cloning/imaging program you are using and clone Disk 1 to Disk 2 from there.

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      • #2281102 Reply
        Guest
        AskWoody Lounger

        Thank you everyone for all the help and endless patience.  It is sincerely appreciated.

        An additional question that has been brought up a couple of times that I want to make sure I understand.  Whether cloning or imaging (a complete image of everything) my current old harddrive and then restoring that clone or image to the new harddrive that will replace my internal laptop harddrive, will that restored clone/image function identically to what it is now or will/might require Windows to get confused because the harddrive was replaced?

        The laptop was purchased new and the only license I know of is a worn paper type sticker attached to the bottom of the laptop.  Is that enough if needed or will I run into further issues even if I restore the clone/image to the new harddrive?

        I found this link which, if still applies, sounds concerning.  https://www.howtogeek.com/239815/why-cant-you-move-a-windows-installation-to-another-computer/

        • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 1 day ago by Guest.
        • #2281117 Reply
          Cybertooth
          AskWoody Plus

          You should be able to use the new drive without a hiccup, so long as it’s on the same computer as the drive that you cloned it from. The only problem I can remember has to do with playing copy-protected TV recordings in Windows Media Center that were recorded on the old drive.

          The issue that you saw in How-To Geek involves putting the same drive into a new computer. That could confuse Windows because it expects to see a certain hardware configuration, and then it doesn’t. What you’re doing, though, is putting a new drive into the same computer, so Windows shouldn’t get confused.

          Good luck, and enjoy your new HDD!

           

          • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 1 day ago by Cybertooth. Reason: typo
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      • #2281813 Reply
        T
        AskWoody Plus

        …have you tried the built-in windows system image tool under Backup and Restore? I’m surprised nobody mentioned it but that’s what i used and it worked for me. I don’t want to add to your complexity but if Macrium keeps throwing up that error then it’s worth a try. Of course then you need to purchase some external storage on which you save the system image but you should have one of those for backup anyway and i highly recommend one of the little WD portable drives. I have a WD My Passport Ultra 1TB but i didn’t restore from that because i have a desktop PC and restored from an internal WD Black drive.

        Hope you get it sorted out.

        • #2281838 Reply
          T
          AskWoody Plus

          Hold on… what happened to the rest of my comment? Did i say something inappropriate or was it because it wasn’t strictly on topic?

      • #2281931 Reply
        Guest
        AskWoody Lounger

        Update.  Everything is complete and I think is working as expected.  I do not know why but, so far, the new harddrive appears to be running hotter than the old one ever did.  Keeping an eye on that but I also do not know what I could do about it.  I think I will run a chkdsk /r scan on it.

        Thank you kindly to everyone that offered their time, input and patience.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2282019 Reply
          T
          AskWoody Plus

          No idea why my comments keep getting deleted but glad you got it sorted.

      • #2282496 Reply
        Guest
        AskWoody Lounger

        Not sure if it is best to post this in this thread or I should create a new one but the new hard drive, Seagate BarraCuda ST1000LM048, temperature is way hotter than the failing 9 year old drive ever was. Is this something I can or should do something about or is it within expected range (or companies are just more aggressive sabotaging life expentacy)?

        The old drive would routinely operate around 38°C/100°F to 40°C/104°F during normal use. Only going higher during a virus scan or other long continous use. Even then, I never saw it go beyond 46°C/115°F until I did the imaging or chkdsk scan that took hours (that hit 50°C/122°F).

        The new drive so far has been 42°C/107°F to 44°C/111°F best case scenario (just sitting idle to opening up one browser tab) and got up to 60°C/140°F when I did a chkdsk yesterday.

        I am positive I installed it correctly (triple checked and hard to mistake). Laptop is solely stationary used as a desktop replacement on stand with riser feet for better air flow. Routinely cleaned out with compressed air and the comparison temps between old and new were watched regularly in the days/weeks, and have been years before also, leading up to replacing it so a large sample size.

        Just the way it is, lemon.. ?

      • #2282638 Reply
        Paul T
        AskWoody MVP

        New hard disks squeeze more data into less space. This inevitably means they run hotter and 44 is not a problem.

        Why do you think running “chkdsk /r” is going to do anything except heat stress your disk?

        cheers, Paul

      • #2282739 Reply
        Guest
        AskWoody Lounger

        New hard disks squeeze more data into less space. This inevitably means they run hotter and 44 is not a problem.

        Why do you think running “chkdsk /r” is going to do anything except heat stress your disk?

        cheers, Paul

        Thank you Paul T.  I was concerned because it is running hotter during normal activity compared to anything I have seen on this computer and reached, what Seagate listed as its maximum operating temperature, 60°C/140°F just during the restore image process and hit 50°C/122°F multiple times already.

        I checked a couple of articles that suggested that was not typical and would lead to early drive failure.  Given it is brand new and under light use, outside of the image restore process and chkdsk, I wanted to make sure it wasn’t a sign of a lemon.

        Regarding the chkdsk question.  From what I read, the /r parameter was required to find bad sectors/clusters and recover/fix them which didn’t happen other than using that parameter.  From my use of it, I found that to be the case as the less intensive chkdsk without /r did not find any issues on my old hard drive.  When I used the /r it found the errors.

        But, using chkdsk was used solely to try and figure out the cause of the clone fail, attempt to get that and imaging to succeed and run on the new drive using the recommended /b parameter to clear the errors leftover from the image of the bad drive rather than something that will be run, probably ever again short of some future need.

        • #2285453 Reply
          kiwisolutionz
          AskWoody Lounger

          Hi Team ; >) if my HD was bad i would just save the data I need and also save that new HD to put a brand new OS onto it instead of a faulty HD OS if I’m reading right here. Why clone a faulty HD onto a new one is my FAQ here. once you have installed new OS remember to make an image of the OS while it is in tip top new condition for a rainy day, cheers team.

          If there is magic on this earth ... it's in the water.

      • #2282765 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        Hi,

        Just a suggestion – Partition Alignment :  if you have not done so for your new installed HDD, you might want to try  https://www.partitionwizard.com/help/align-partition.html or any similar partition software to check on the partition alignment and align them to optimise your HDD drive performance and also see if the heating issue can be reduced.

        Good luck.

      • #2282770 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        Hi again,

        Same Anon poster as above. Forgot to include this ref link :

        https://www.howtogeek.com/270358/how-to-speed-up-your-solid-state-drive-by-re-aligning-its-partitions/

        Although the HowToGeek article refers to SSDs, the alignment issue also covers migration of Windows 7 OS from legacy 512 bytes HDDs to 512-emulation Advance Format HDDs .

        Re : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Advanced_Format

        Best Of luck.

      • #2282784 Reply
        Paul T
        AskWoody MVP

        Regarding the chkdsk question.  From what I read, the /r parameter was required to find bad sectors/clusters and recover/fix them which didn’t happen other than using that parameter

        Modern hard disks are self checking and correcting, you do not need to do this manually. Old hard disks (pre IDE – 20 years ago) did not have error checking and a regular manual check of the disk was a reasonable precaution.

        cheers, Paul

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