Woody Leonhard's no-bull news, tips and help for Windows, Office and more… Please disable your ad blocker – our (polite!) ads help keep AskWoody going!
Home icon Home icon Home icon Email icon RSS icon
  • Fresh Start for new PC?

    Posted on ArtistAnn Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Home Forums AskWoody support Windows Windows 10 Questions: Win10 Fresh Start for new PC?

    This topic contains 6 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  ArtistAnn 1 month, 1 week ago.

    • Author
      Posts
    • #209160 Reply

      ArtistAnn
      AskWoody Lounger

      Greetings Forumites!

      I am moving from a PC running Win 7 Home to a new HP desktop. I’m a Win 10 virgin who has been performing due diligence, so I plan to set up the new computer with an offline/local account. Immediately thereafter, I would like to do a Fresh Start to bring the OS back to its pre-bloatware state. First I have a couple of questions that some kind soul(s) might help me with?

      1 – Woody’s greatest-of-all-time Dummies, 3rd. Ed., walks the reader through avoiding creating a Windows Account when adding users (pp. 133-142, 150, 151). Is there anywhere I can get step-by-step instructions on how to boot up the PC for the first time and set up an offline/local account?

      2Can I proceed directly from a successful setup to the Windows Defender Security Center and initiate Fresh Start, or is it advisable to first tick off some of the items on the Windows 10 All-In-One for Dummies Cheat Sheet? I also want to test each of the ports and the optical drive to make sure they are functioning and not a cause for returning the machine. Before or after FS for that?

      3 – From the instructions I found at HowtoGeekdotcom, doing a Fresh Start seems that the login to my PC won’t be affected and I won’t have any problem rebooting and getting in again. Is that correct? Or should I establish password security questions before doing the Fresh Start?

      4 – I understand that any drivers installed by HP will be lost during the Fresh Start. Not being a hardware/firmware geek, the only pertinent drivers I can think of are for the Intel dedicated graphics and the NVIDIA GPU. It’s a good guess there must be other drivers for, ah, thingies in the box, but what are they? [BTW, I’m glad I’ve been prompted to ask this, because I can’t periodically check for all my driver updates if I don’t know what they are!]

      5 – Last question (I promise!): Better to go to the HP website to reload drivers and check for driver updates, or to go to the individual component manufacturers’ websites?

      Thank you for reading thus far and for your assistance!

      Ann

      Ann

      Desktop PC, Win 10 Home v. 1709, MS Office 2016, Adobe Photoshop & Bridge 2018
    • #209311 Reply

      woody
      Da Boss

      Hey, Ann!

      Flattery will get you everywhere.

      You can boot for the first time with a local account. The instructions are the same as setting up a local account – you have to click the obscure lines at the bottom a couple of times — but it’ll go through as described in the book. Microsoft’s hokey security question setup will kick in — you’re guided through everything you need to get started.

      Go ahead and get started, make sure everything is connected, do anything you like, before you flip over to the Defender Fresh start. I wouldn’t worry about the miscellaneous settings until you run Fresh start — many of them will get clobbered in the Fresh start process. Your id and password won’t change, though — no need to worry about setting up security questions.

      All of your drivers should be restored. No problem. From time to time, you might want to drop by HP’s site and install the latest drivers. No need to go to the individual manufacturers’ sites.

      Hope that helps!

       

      • #209605 Reply

        anonymous

        Dear Computer Guru,

        Thank you so much for your response! I have felt like I’m stuck on a deserted island with a washed-up metal box that I’m afraid to touch. PC, or naval mine?!

        LOL Every six or so years, when I have to change out my home computer, I exhaust myself on the project. One would think I’m preparing to launch a Triton missile. I had to familiarize myself with every component of the latest PCs. I’ve compiled 20 e-folders, from Apple to Windows, filled with articles, specifications, notes and comparison matrices. Quality control in the monitor industry has taken a dive since I last made a purchase, ergo I still haven’t reconciled myself to which display or TV to risk my money on. My copy of your book [only 940 pages? goodness, man, you’re brief!] bristles with post-it notes. My checklist for setting up the new computer exceeds 15 legal pages and counting.

        I am retired, and I cannot fathom how the IT tech who worked for me was able to switch out a mission-critical PC in one day! Nor can I remember how I found the time to work. . . .

        Again, much obliged, sir.

        • #209660 Reply

          AlexEiffel
          AskWoody MVP

          Wow, I fear you will have a hard time with Windows 10, then. Not wanting to shut down your party, but if you were that analytical when installing previous Windows version, you will be very sorry to have a forced reinstalled Windows for you and some settings reset by Microsoft every few months with Windows 10.

          I am a bit like you so I had to make tools to make some changes semi-automatic with Windows 10 after each feature update and still, I still have to check everything. I am not happy at all about that. Finished are the days where I could set the computer the way I liked it and be good for many years with it, following a 50 pages long procedure. Someone here mentioned the Unix philosophy recently, as Windows 10 progress, the more I feel that I belong to the Unix philosophy and not the Windows as a service philosophy.

          I have a suggestion for the drivers. Go to the manufacturer’s web site, check what they offer. Always google everything to check if it is really required. Lots of things are just bloat and close t0 spyware marketing gimmicks. I keep my installs minimal and I custom install every driver to remove unnecessary components. Even Intel now has so many services starting that I don’t want, it makes me mad. HP were not the best when it comes to no bloat so be careful with what you install from them, but I don’t know recently if they got better as I don’t buy their products often. I think if I am not mistaken they even installed some phone home thing in some of their printers…

          For monitors, I don’t know about your needs but there are a few standout monitors that suit most people quite well if their moderate price is not too much for them. I mostly use Asus P series and Dell U series, 24 inches. The 1920×1200 resolution is interesting because it is able to play full HD videos while giving you more vertical screen real estate. The colors on those monitors are pre-calibrated in factory. I have many of those at work and reliability have been stellar. I would invest in a good monitor with such a resolution and not a 4K one unless you really have a good reason to, maybe for photography but then we would be in a different range with considerations about higher bit hardware LUT tables to color manage better. If your needs are more basic, by the time 4K is exploited well enough, you might have amortized your monitor enough to buy a better 4K for a reasonable price instead of staying with a cheap 4K that you would have bought for being with the latest trend. And newer safer OLED with blue light protection will make me want to buy a new screen for sure. I had monitor issues only with cheap monitors, that I try to avoid as much as possible, and a set of great Samsung monitors bought around the time where there was capacitors issues in the industry, so I will not hold it against Samsung that all of them had their capacitors break after 7-9 years. I don’t have statistics though, only anecdotal evidence.

          Sorry if I sound cynical, I wouldn’t have been that way with Windows 8.1 and prior. I wish you to have fun with your computer. Maybe you will want to switch to Linux with Windows in a VM at some point if you don’t like not understanding your always changing computer and not being in control no more. People here will be able to help.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #215016 Reply

            ArtistAnn
            AskWoody Lounger

            Thanks for your thoughtful reply, Alex. I haven’t been on the site and didn’t realize there were more answers to my post!

            In the last weeks I started my new computer, set up my local account without difficulty, answered the dozens of security questions (good for Ms for responding to its customers’ complaints about spying and providing so many opt-outs!) After looking through Device Manager and learning that every bit of hardware has a driver (it’s like the drivers have drivers!), I no longer felt comfortable with doing a Fresh Start. There wasn’t as much bloatware shipped with the HP as I’d expected, so I carefully selected what I thought I wouldn’t need, and performed uninstalls. At that point, I restarted the computer for the first time, to complete a number of the uninstalls. And shortly thereafter I let the computer go on the web for the first time.

            There were really no bumps until that point. I expected Windows Updater to immediately get busy, but it didn’t, so I prompted Windows Defender to check for updates. After a few minutes the updater stalled, and it took a number of restarts and some goosing to get Win and HP to finish downloading and installing. HP was about to replace the GPU driver with an older version, but I caught it. And I’m going to swap out the generic Win driver for my new monitor with the proprietary driver from Asus.

            It’s cool to hear that you use Asus monitors! And my faithful workhorses, since forever, have been Dells. Good sense finally got through to me and I decided to buy a moderately priced, 24″, FHD, real 8-bit (!) monitor and leave the purchase of a large 4K monitor for after I’ve got the CPU squared away. The plan is to put a 32″ monitor in the middle, with my old and new 24″ monitors, in portrait mode, on either side of it. I’ll use the 4k mostly for Photoshop and the others for browsing and writing. And when I’m processing new digital assets in Adobe Bridge, I will finally have plenty of space for four windows to be open simultaneously!

            The 4K I’m looking at has a LUT and a color gamut about 20% larger than sRGB, but I’m not going to worry too much about keeping it calibrated because I don’t print my artwork and don’t foresee having a reason to in the near future.

            I’m not going to fight Win’s automatic updates. I’m going to try keeping my fingers crossed that most of the bugs that crawl out of updates will affect parts of the system I don’t use. 😉

            Re your suggestion about Linux, I looked into that, too! Photoshop absolutely won’t run on it, so I downloaded Gimp to check it out. I quickly realized that I’ve spent too much time and effort over the last three years learning Photoshop to stomach starting over with another program. However, I would have made the switch to Apple, to avoid the Win 10 problems. But that was a dead-end, too. Apparently Photoshop and the Mac OS historically do not play well together. Currently there is an unworkable incompatibility between the two softwares that neither company will acknowledge or assume responsibility for fixing, to the point that desperate professional photographers and graphic designers have been forced to abandon their Macs and purchase Windows machines! Unbelievable and outrageous when the pride of two software giants jeopardizes the very livelihoods of their poor customers!!

            What, may I ask, keeps you in front of a PC screen? As an MVP, you must spend even more time in front of a monitor than I do. 🙂

            Hey, one more question for you–I read that Ms was promising, in its last big update, to stop reinstalling Ms apps that had been uninstalled by the user. Has that come to pass? I haven’t deleted any of the Ms apps but will be pleased to do so if I know they won’t come bouncing back.

            Thanks again, Alex, for your thoughtful suggestions.

            Ann

            Desktop PC, Win 10 Home v. 1709, MS Office 2016, Adobe Photoshop & Bridge 2018
    • #209652 Reply

      GoneToPlaid
      AskWoody Lounger

      Dear Computer Guru, Thank you so much for your response! I have felt like I’m stuck on a deserted island with a washed-up metal box that I’m afraid to touch. PC, or naval mine?! LOL Every six or so years, when I have to change out my home computer, I exhaust myself on the project. One would think I’m preparing to launch a Triton missile. I had to familiarize myself with every component of the latest PCs. I’ve compiled 20 e-folders, from Apple to Windows, filled with articles, specifications, notes and comparison matrices. Quality control in the monitor industry has taken a dive since I last made a purchase, ergo I still haven’t reconciled myself to which display or TV to risk my money on. My copy of your book [only 940 pages? goodness, man, you’re brief!] bristles with post-it notes. My checklist for setting up the new computer exceeds 15 legal pages and counting. I am retired, and I cannot fathom how the IT tech who worked for me was able to switch out a mission-critical PC in one day! Nor can I remember how I found the time to work. . . . Again, much obliged, sir.

      I figure that you are ArtistAnn, even though your post shows a anonymous? If so, then following are a few comments.

      ArtistAnn, it sounds like the artist in you is your personal passion, yet being an attorney was your previous profession? Just curious.

      Hmm…How did the IT tech switch out a mission-critical PC? Most likely because the replacement PC was a major brand name PC which included Windows Activation keys within the replacement computer’s BIOS. Thus, pretty much the deal is to simply install the old computer’s hard drive into the new computer, and then let Windows install any new device drivers, and then perhaps to do any required tweaks for the the new computer in terms of networking within the office.

      Your next implied question was about computer monitors and computer compatible TVs. Simply read online reviews for a specific potential product purchase on sites such as NewEgg and Amazon, and at the same time consider the quantity of reviews. The greater the quantity of reviews, then the greater statistical significance of the reviews. For example, newly introduced products will have very few reviews, and should be treated with caution since such newly introduced products have not built up a track record in terms of issues and reliability.

      I recommend that you buy from retailers who have clearly defined return policies if you are not happy with your purchase. Reject any vague return policies, as such vague return policies usually are to the benefit of the seller.

      Always check out the warranty for the products which you are considering purchasing. There is more than just the mere product warranty. Also check out how long a given manufacturer provides support for their products. Product support and product warranties can be two very different things.

      Beware that product warranty periods frequently apply to when the product was first introduced into the marketplace, and NOT upon the date on which you purchased the product. Yes, the computer industry is a dirty industry, due to the plethora of competitors.

      On the other hand, higher tier manufacturers may offer much longer product support, in terms of helping you with issues, yet not in terms of repairs if your purchased product is out of warranty. A few of the highest tier manufacturers offer lifetime support for their products. Yet forum rules prevent everyone from promoting or “plugging” any specific manufacturers.

      I hope that I have answered your questions, and that I have pointed you in the right direction in terms of things which you might consider before making any purchases.

       

      • #215022 Reply

        ArtistAnn
        AskWoody Lounger

        Hello, Plaid Person! Yes, ArtistAnn here. Learning the ropes of how to use this forum. I had a devil of a time getting my first post to go through and needed lots of coaching from one of the monitors. God bless her!

        To answer your questions, I wasn’t a lawyer but a records manager. And I loved that kind of work. I found it as relaxing and engrossing as digital art and performing research, so I’m one more example of how varied and unpredictable the human personality is.

        The PCs we used at work were all Dell business models and we would switch out an older, slower machine for a brand new one. The software we used was limited to Ms Office Suite and Adobe Acrobat. We had one master copy of the software and a cache of keys that we purchased, so installing and updating the software was quick and easy. Every employee had his/her working files stored in a separate directory on the server, so there was no need to transfer files between machines.

        Regarding reading reviews, I certainly did a lot of that. You can see my reply to AlexEiffel, above, if you’re curious where I finally put my money. 🙂 Amazon is a terrifically discouraging place to research monitors because virtually every model is rated 3 or below by roughly 25% of the responders. Also, they very often lump the reviews together for all the models by one manufacturer. It took me awhile to realize that!

        Early on I found http://www.DisplaySpecifications.com and I used the site religiously. I was particularly interested in whether displays were true 8- and 10-bit or whether they used frame rate control. I also wanted to know who manufactured the panel, whether it had flicker-free and blue light technology, and if there was a VESA mount. And then I would start focusing on some other aspect of monitor technology and have to go back and check the stats again. Having all the specs in one place was a lifesaver! I’m going to have to make a monetary contribution to that site to thank them. TechPowerUp was very helpful when I was comparing video cards.

        I agree that warranties are an important subject. I’ve found in life that getting warranty service usually doesn’t work well. If you need to ship the item to the manufacturer, it gets expensive, and most companies do their utmost to discourage unhappy customers from filing claims. The last thing I want is to get into a wrestling match like that, and after reading so many horror stories about monitors that were DOA or pooped out within months, I was really intimidated. We have BestBuy where I live, and at least you carry the item back to the store within two weeks if it’s obviously a lemon. Their add-on, extended warranty used to cover breakdowns during the manufacturer’s warranty period, but unfortunately it no longer does. If you make the purchase with an American Express card, Amex doubles the warranty period, and I know their customer service is superlative, so that’s what I’m reassuring myself with. 🙂

        I know what you mean about high-end manufacturers, as well as companies that used to have a great product or praiseworthy customer service and have gone shockingly the other way in recent years. I’ve constantly felt like a potential victim! It has been a relief to finally start working with a new computer and monitor and to not be met with too many unpleasant surprises. Having a thousand things to do to get my system up and properly running has been good for me after stewing over the decision-making process!

        Ann

        Desktop PC, Win 10 Home v. 1709, MS Office 2016, Adobe Photoshop & Bridge 2018

    Please follow the -Lounge Rules- no personal attacks, no swearing, and politics/religion are relegated to the Rants forum.

    Reply To: Fresh Start for new PC?

    You can use BBCodes to format your content.
    Your account can't use Advanced BBCodes, they will be stripped before saving.

    Your information:


    Comments are closed.