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    Home Forums Outside the box COVID-19 good links for coronavirus info

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      • #2177757
        wavy
        AskWoody Plus

        Many good links already given, but w/o extraneous comments here are 3 more.

        https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/2020/02/here-is-what-coronavirus-does-to-the-body/
        https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/2020/01/how-coronavirus-spreads-on-a-plane/

        https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/2020/02/what-happens-to-coronavirus-covid-19-in-warmer-spring-temperatures/

        EDITED links (removed identifiers)

        🍻

        Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
      • #2188664
        jayinalaska
        AskWoody Plus

        This Ars Technica article is one of the more rational ones I’ve found on COVID-19. It’s supposedly updated daily at 3:00 PM Eastern Time (US), which is 1900 UTC.

        3 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2190515
          wavy
          AskWoody Plus

          Yes that is a good one I was just going to post that with 2 others.

          A look at survivability of SARS-C0V-2 on surfaces

          https://www.journalofhospitalinfection.com/article/S0195-6701(20)30046-3/fulltext

          A few myths debunked
          https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/advice-for-public/myth-busters

          🍻

          Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
          • #2190529
            Elly
            AskWoody MVP

            Two pertinent facts from the WHO link:

            To date, there is no specific medicine recommended to prevent or treat the new coronavirus (2019-nCoV).

            and

            …it takes between 2 and 10 days before people who are infected become sick and develop a fever.

            That fact is why initial measures, based on detecting the infection by its symptoms and fever and preventing its spread, were inadequate. Knowing that, people can effectively use social distancing.

            Non-techy Win 10 Pro and Linux Mint experimenter

            1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2190419
        Robb
        AskWoody Plus
      • #2190563
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        These three links are to three CDC (Centers for Disease Control) Web pages. They explain the current situation in the USA and provide timely advice to its people:

        https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/about/share-facts.html

        https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/summary.html

        https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html

        This being a site subscribed to by people from different countries, perhaps others could contribute similar links to pages with advice and situation updates of organizations in some of those other countries that are in charge of protecting public health, especially those directly concerned with containing the spread of COVID-19

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

      • #2190570
        firemind
        AskWoody Lounger

        Information from British Columbia.

        http://www.bccdc.ca/health-info/diseases-conditions/covid-19

        I tried https but ended back at the insecure site but it does have good info.

      • #2190572
        Nathan Parker
        AskWoody_MVP

        I found this which looks like a good way to see stats at a glance. Updates every minute: https://ncov2019.live/data

        Nathan Parker

        4 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2190589
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          Nathan, I just looked around for information on the “Dashboard”-style site that you have given a link to. The story behind it is very interesting:

          https://1077theend.radio.com/blogs/gregr/seattle-teen-builds-a-leading-source-of-covid-19-data

          A Mercer Island kid coded a website (ncov2019.live) that’s keeping the world up to date on the data behind COVID-19 aka the coronavirus. According to GeekWire.com, Avi Schiffmann started tracking the data and building the site back in January and as the media gets more and more sensational, people are relying on the information he’s providing to the tune of 2 million visitors to his site to date.

          His site updates every 10 minutes and keeps us up to date on total confirmed cases, cases confirmed outside China, total deaths, total recoveries, and the number of countries affected/infected by COVID-19.

          Another COVID-19 news aggregator with multiple links to sources of information on various aspects of the current situation I have come across while searching for the information on “Dashboard”:

          https://a16z.com/2020/03/08/novel-coronavirus-and-covid-19-disease-resources-readings/

          (Before using the links offered by this and similar crowd-sourced information gathering sites make sure to check, particularly those links to sites that are not of well-known government or private organizations, for potential phishing or misleading information.)

           

          Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2190602
        Nathan Parker
        AskWoody_MVP

        Thanks for posting the background. I already had the news site closed out by the time I posted this here. I should have included the news site with it.

        It seems the info he’s using on the “Dashboard” is from official sources. The only issue I saw so far is his map for Arkansas isn’t showing the cases, but he does state that Arkansas itself has the cases in the “Dashboard” (could be the way the map source is plotting it). I went ahead and gave him the $3 donation to keep up the work. His site now updates every minute.

        Great site you also shared. Thanks for the info!

        Nathan Parker

        • #2190621
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          Nathan, I was referring to the second link I pasted in my previous comment, the one to an aggregator of information on the COVID-19 situation, Because there are so many links there provided by, I imagine, quite a number of people, although the site may be well curated, it is possible that links to the more obscure URLs may lead to pages that are compromised.  It may be difficult to check them properly before including them in a list, or to keep checking them in case they become compromised after they got their initial vetoing. Curating such a site… drinking water from a fire hose, and all that.

          One final observation: it is almost a cliché, but true in real life, that some, particularly on the plus side of sixty, often comment negatively about “kids these days!”

          I know of several exceptional people, aged 16 through 20, that are making great things in the arts, in social activism, and, as in this case, helping us to understand what is going on, worldwide, in matters of tremendous importance.

          Kids: please, keep it up; we need your talents and your help!

          Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2190796
        SteveTree
        AskWoody Lounger

        WHO alternative to John Hopkins

        https://experience.arcgis.com/experience/685d0ace521648f8a5beeeee1b9125cd

        Click a country on the RHS to change the graph.

        For those who really want to see the media sensation, SurfWax is a handy search engine for news, which it gathers from 140 RSS sites. Unfortunately, it is far from elegant to use.  It will not open results in a new window. Opened in the same Window, the back-arrow takes you back to the web page but the search results are gone.

        To use, just start typing (e.g. covid) in the search box. SurfWax  filters the news for you as you type. To restrict results further add another key word with the plus symbol between (e.g. “covid + trump” without the quotes). Read the ‘tips’ link to find out more.

        Group A (but Telemetry disabled Tasks and Registry)
        Win 7 64 Pro desktop
        Win 10 64 Home portable

      • #2190835
        geekdom
        AskWoody Plus

        How to Help Others:

        https://www.pbs.org/newshour/health/how-to-help-others-in-the-covid-19-crisis

        G{ot backup} TestBeta
        offline▸ Win7Pro SP1 x64 InUse
        online▸ Win10Pro 1909.18363.752 x64 i5-9400 RAM8GB HDD Firefox76.0b2 Windows{Image/Defender/Firewall}
      • #2190869
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        There are several links here to actions being taken by governments around the world to prevent the further spread of COVID-19:

        Are there plans, beyond sending the message “don’t panic”

        After an unusual start, because I did not started it, but it was started for me when Woody moved a comment of mine to be the first of this thread in the COVID-19 forum, something that might have caused some misunderstandings about the purpose of the thread, which is “what are governments really doing about this?”, or at least what I understood it to be about, as I tried to explain and got admonished for doing this… things finally got a more or less normal start.

        Now there are there links to actions taken by several European governments, including as recently as today. Also a complete video of the hearings in the US Congress, two days ago, with a number of well informed experts testifying on what is being done in this country, served with a side of choice sour partisan wrangling. But is is mostly interesting and informative testimonies. It is also fairly long.

        Anyone that can contribute similar information there: please, do so, but avoid politically partisan commentary, as this thread is in the COVID-19 forum, not in the “Rants” forum.

        Edit: to correct COVID-90 to COVID-19.

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

      • #2208151
        woody
        Da Boss

        I just found this one:

        https://covidtracking.com/data/

        If you’ve never seen a data gathering nightmare, this one’s right up there. Absolutely no uniformity in reporting among the states. Thus, the totals are highly suspect. If you want to know how many tests have been performed, this is the closest reliable estimate I’ve seen – but it’s absolutely riddled with data holes.

        4 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2208869
        wavy
        AskWoody Plus

        how-south-korea-scaled-coronavirus-testing-while-the-us-fell-dangerously-behind

        https://www.propublica.org/article/how-south-korea-scaled-coronavirus-testing-while-the-us-fell-dangerously-behind

        🍻

        Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
      • #2209567
        wavy
        AskWoody Plus

        FWIW National Geo has info w/o a paywall now
        https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/coronavirus-coverage/?cmpid=org=ngp::mc=crm-email::src=ngp::cmp=editorial::add=SpecialEdition_20200320&rid=5D4C28F171002B77384BE30BE3D6155E

        🍻

        Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
        • #2209568
          PKCano
          Da Boss

          After about 30 seconds it requires you to enter an email address to keep reading.

          • #2209569
            wavy
            AskWoody Plus

            Sorry about that. Worked for me , maybe script blocker at work.

            🍻

            Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
            • #2209585
              OscarCP
              AskWoody Plus

              It has worked just fine for me too: just read one of the long articles there and no inconvenient pop up showed up telling me to do something to continue reading. PK’s problem might have something to do with the browser of computer setup. (I am using Waterfox with add blocker in a Mac running macOS version Mojave, with all recent updates installed.)

              Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

          • #2209587
            Elly
            AskWoody MVP

            This worked fine for me, with no pop-ups or other asks to register or pay.

            Not only that, National Geographic has a large number of well-written articles about COVID-19, without getting too technical, or minimizing, or inflaming the subject.

            Non-techy Win 10 Pro and Linux Mint experimenter

            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #2209640
              wavy
              AskWoody Plus

              so glad you liked it. Like others they are not charging for covid19 content

              🍻

              Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
              1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2209588
          PKCano
          Da Boss

          Well, I added anything – abc@yoohoo.com – and got access.
          ???? – obviously not valid

          2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2209696
        Nathan Parker
        AskWoody_MVP

        Free eBook from a Macworld contributor on working from home:

        https://www.macworld.com/article/3532888/get-a-free-copy-of-the-new-take-control-of-working-from-home-temporarily-ebook.html

        Nathan Parker

        3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2209768
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Nathan, I have been working from home, come to think about it, since the early 1980’s, on and off: I would connect, by phone, to the network of a university or government center, where there was a computer I would be using to get things done. From home, often that was considerably faster than going all the way there, to be on base to do it: just hop out of bed, wash face, clean teeth, have shower, comb hair, maybe even shave, have breakfast, plug in modem, and away I would go, clicking away on the PC or Mac that I was using as a dumb terminal to the actual computer, most likely a mainframe, doing the number crunching at the other end of the telephone line.

        So it is  bit odd for me to read that there is a manual for doing this. But of course there is!  It’s got to be! Just a week ago, a few days before everyone deemed “non-essential personnel” (if they don’t show up and take care of something, it might blow up) was finally sent home and told to work from there until whenever, there was a course given to civil servants and contractors, at the NASA Center where I do my regular work, on the practicalities of how to telecommute and do what one has to do, including teleconferencing, from one’s own house. Everybody there, pretty much, has had already at least a little experience with doing this, but to have to do it as a total replacement from a day at the office, and keep this up, day after day, in real life, that is quite something else.

        So: good luck to everyone that is clicking away, on a keyboard, telephoning away, or Skype-ing away the hours at the den, or in the living, trying to keep up with work and cursing the pesky technology that keeps getting mysteriously in the way… And getting to know to, and be known by, in first-name terms even, the helpful individuals at the properly called (I hope in your case too) “Help Desk.”

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2209781
        Nathan Parker
        AskWoody_MVP

        Yeah, I do all my work and school assignments from home. For me, it’s second nature. For those new to it, I guess they do need some pointers. Once they get spoiled to the luxuries of it though, it’ll be hard for them to go back to an office. 🙂

        Nathan Parker

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2209785
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          Nathan, good point: How ya gonna keep ’em down in the office after they’ve seen Paree? Or rather their comfy den as their home-office, so well-appointed for a relaxed and laid back work-day? Not having to bother to get ready, not yet quite bright but certainly very early, for a plain vanilla commute, meaning actually going all the way to the office and later that day an pretty tired already, coming back home from there, often making one or both trips at the height of the rush hour? Plus several other benefits of telecommuting, such as not having to put up with constant interruptions for irrelevant matters that interrupt the necessary concentration and makes things harder to get done.

          And how will the very idea of having all employees working always under one roof be changed by the experience many are now starting to have, prompted by the threat posed by COVID-19, once this becomes history? Here is an article on this very interesting question:

          COVID-19 makes the benefits of telework obvious

          Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

      • #2209816
        Paul T
        AskWoody MVP

        such as not having to put up with constant interruptions for irrelevant matters

        When someone comes to talk to me I see it as an interruption.
        When some comes to talk to you, you see it as an opportunity to make a friend.

        cheers, Paul

      • #2209968
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Paul T ( #2209816 ): “When some comes to talk to you, you see it as an opportunity to make a friend.

        Unless that person is already a friend; or is someone one does not want to have as a friend.

        Being free of interruptions while concentrating on one’s work, whether by friends or not friends, to me is one good point in favor of telecommuting. There are others, such as: not having to commute, with the side-benefits of reducing traffic congestion and accidents, CO2 releases, and so on. Social life might come to depend on being every working day at an office, for some white-collar people. I’ve always found that sad.

        And in these times where whole countries are becoming hostages to an invisible foe, the COVID-19 virus, telecommuting, for those whose type of work allows it, is a sensible measure now being implemented with their workforce, in many places, by government authorities and responsible managers of private businesses.

        https://www.huffpost.com/entry/trump-administration-telecommute-coronavirus_n_5e67f43cc5b6670e73000a48

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

      • #2210003
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Here is a link to a US state governor’s public statement, in the form of an open-air press conference, two days ago, on measures being taken (in this video in Maryland) to deal with the present health emergency and the general situation there. But that is not all.

        Next to the video proper, on the right of the screen, there are the usual large icon-style links, in this case, to other, similar, public statements made by other governors, Congress, the President, etc. on the current situation, measures already taken and those being planned:

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_fySinsimsk

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

      • #2210511
        anonymous
        Guest

        Note  this topic is

        good links for coronavirus info

        More and more, the containment response is looking like global panic. What’s interesting, Psychology Today points out, is that your doctor is not panicking:

        COVID-19 is a new virus in a well-known class of viruses. The coronaviruses are cold viruses. I’ve treated countless patients with coronaviruses over the years. In fact, we’ve been able to test for them on our respiratory panels for the entirety of my career.

        We know how cold viruses work: They cause runny noses, sneezing, cough, and fever, and make us feel tired and achy. For almost all of us, they run their course without medication. And in the vulnerable, they can trigger a more severe illness like asthma or pneumonia.

        Yes, this virus is different and worse than other coronaviruses, but it still looks very familiar. We know more about it than we don’t know.

        Doctors know what to do with respiratory viruses. As a pediatrician, I take care of patients with hundreds of different viruses that behave similarly to this one. We take care of the kids at home and see them if the fever is prolonged, if they get dehydrated, or if they develop breathing difficulty. Then we treat those problems and support the child until they get better.

        Meanwhile, the New England Journal of Medicine reports as follows:

        On the basis of a case definition requiring a diagnosis of pneumonia, the currently reported case fatality rate is approximately 2%. In another article in the Journal, Guan et al. report mortality of 1.4% among 1,099 patients with laboratory-confirmed Covid-19; these patients had a wide spectrum of disease severity. If one assumes that the number of asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic cases is several times as high as the number of reported cases, the case fatality rate may be considerably less than 1%. This suggests that the overall clinical consequences of Covid-19 may ultimately be more akin to those of a severe seasonal influenza (which has a case fatality rate of approximately 0.1%) or a pandemic influenza (similar to those in 1957 and 1968) rather than a disease similar to SARS or MERS, which have had case fatality rates of 9 to 10% and 36%, respectively.

        Slate’s piece on this topic offers more perspective:

        This all suggests that COVID-19 is a relatively benign disease for most young people, and a potentially devastating one for the old and chronically ill, albeit not nearly as risky as reported. Given the low mortality rate among younger patients with coronavirus—zero in children 10 or younger among hundreds of cases in China, and 0.2-0.4 percent in most healthy nongeriatric adults (and this is still before accounting for what is likely to be a high number of undetected asymptomatic cases)—we need to divert our focus away from worrying about preventing systemic spread among healthy people—which is likely either inevitable, or out of our control—and commit most if not all of our resources toward protecting those truly at risk of developing critical illness and even death: everyone over 70, and people who are already at higher risk from this kind of virus.

        [Link removed]

         

        https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/coronavirus-symptoms-covid-19-cold-flu-difference-latest-a9389511.html

        Quoote

        COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus, is a flu-like illness that has killed a small fraction of the number of people that the flu kills every year. Most people infected by the new coronavirus develop mild or moderate symptoms and recover after about two weeks.

        https://www.fox5ny.com/news/flu-vs-common-cold-vs-covid-19-similar-symptoms-many-questions

        Coronavirus is a family of viruses associated with a wide variety of infections, from the common cold to serious infections including SARS and MERS. SARS-COV-2, the virus that causes the COVID-19 infection, emerged in China in late 2019 as a novel form of the Coronavirus.

        https://avivaromm.com/covid19-etiology-epidemiology/

        Coronavirus. These tend to do their dirty work in the winter and early spring. The coronavirus is the cause of about 20% of colds. There are more than 30 kinds, but only three or four affect people.

        https://www.webmd.com/cold-and-flu/cold-guide/common_cold_causes

        As many people know, parts of the world are experiencing an outbreak of a new strain of a well-known family of viruses called Coronaviruses. This family of viruses is not new and in general they cause respiratory illnesses such as the common cold. What is new is this particular strain of Coronaviruses called COVID-19 that was first detected in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China and has since spread to other countries. (You may also see it referred to as nCoV which is an abbreviation for “novel coronavirus”.) Though it also causes upper respiratory symptoms like a common cold, it can be fatal in certain circumstances. But remember, so can the flu.

        https://www.lapeerpediatrics.com/coronavirus-covid-19-update/

        • #2210692
          Elly
          AskWoody MVP

          I wish you had posted more current information. It isn’t that I think anyone should panic over COVID-19, just the virulence is greater than your links, on articles dated March 1-10th, indicate. One of the links is simply for the common cold. The only recent article you posted is simply a review of what is known about COVID-19 symptoms. A lot more has been learned about it, since the beginning of the month, as to how it is impacting people who attended ‘events’ that weren’t cancelled, and whose attendees have taken the virus back to their communities and families… and how quickly even big city hospitals can become overwhelmed as a result.

          Doctors aren’t scared about the virus because they know how it is spread, and what precautions they need to take. But… health professionals were the ones who were asking people to self-isolate when they recognized that testing/quarantine wasn’t being implemented at a fast enough rate… and who are still recommending social distancing and isolation to stop the further spread… and Doctors are refusing to see potentially infected patients when adequate protective gear isn’t available… because they know the risks… They aren’t being selfish- if the healthcare providers become sick, who will care for sick patients?

          There will be time to rebuild the economic health of the country- and all of us are affected. Hopefully we can do a better job than we did when ‘recovering’ from the last recession. Medical professionals are taught to ‘triage’, and have to make such critical decisions, far too often. They know how communicable diseases are spread. They have the training and expertise. Failing to follow their recommendations, describe them as ‘draconian’ or minimize the problems associated with COVID-19, in order to continue economic activities as usual, is simply fool-hardy.

          Non-techy Win 10 Pro and Linux Mint experimenter

          3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2210628
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        The British Prime Minister, for example, has issued yesterday some pretty tough restrictions to people’s movements inside the UK: about living the house; gatherings; types of businesses that can remain open while all others shall close and remain shut down for the duration — with the police under orders to issue fines and, or  book a cozy room for three months in some choice strong quarters, to people caught not following the PM’s orders. (I have posted the link to the BBC article and video of Johnson making the announcement, also with a comment, here  #2210408 .)

        In an article in last weeks issue of “New Scientist” the writer asks, after analyzing the various orders of this type around the world, when such strict measures finally reach their appointed end: “what is the exit strategy?” I thing this is a very good question.

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

      • #2210693
        cmptrgy
        AskWoody Plus

        I posted this information in another forum I subscribe to.
        I would include it here but its 99% political.

        My intent is to include what we can do ourselves while everything is whirling around us.
        Here goes

        Maybe this article could be helpful for those of us who can participate in minimizing the spread of Covid-19.

        Coronavirus prevention: Why soap, sanitizer and warm water work against Covid-19 and other viruses
        https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/medical/coronavirus-prevention-why-soap-sanitizer-and-warm-water-work-against-covid-19-and-other-viruses/ar-BB11Cnh7?ocid=bingcoronaviruslinks

        My paraphrased summary as referred to within the article
        “Wash your hands for 20 seconds each time with soap and warm to help stop the spread of Covid-19, the deadly new disease caused by SARS-CoV-2, or severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2.”

        An additional paraphrased summary of mine
        “Alcohol based sanitizers with at least 60% of alcohol in them can be effective as soap if they are used properly as the alcohol kills the virus.
        >>> But there are situations in which soap and water are best because of the ability of soap and water to trap and wash microorganisms away.”

        HP EliteBook 8540w laptop Windows 10 Pro (x64)

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2210705
          Elly
          AskWoody MVP

          That article does do a good job of describing why soap, and/or alcohol, work on viruses. It also explains the difference between using cold and warm water (you need to wash longer with cold water).

          I like the end:

          So the next time you wash your hands for the umpteenth time, take pride in all those soapy bubbles you’re creating — and enjoy the pleasure of imagining those microscopic, dead creatures circle the drain.

          Non-techy Win 10 Pro and Linux Mint experimenter

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2210833
        wavy
        AskWoody Plus

        Not always true, please see

        https://www.askwoody.com/forums/topic/coronavirus-misinformation-on-tv/#post-2209290

        🍻

        Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
        • This reply was modified 2 weeks, 1 day ago by wavy.
      • #2210874
        wavy
        AskWoody Plus

        U.S. hospitals do not have enough ventilators to meet the spike in cases of respiratory failure that the novel coronavirus is projected to create.

        As ventilators are pressed into round-the-clock use, repair and maintenance issues will increase. While some ventilator manufacturers provide the service information that biomedical technicians need, other manufacturers make it hard to access manuals, read error logs or run diagnostic tests. We need to remove those barriers now.

        Help Ventilators get repaired!

        🍻

        Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2210914
        anonymous
        Guest

        https://www.pottsmerc.com/lifestyle/coronavirus-covid–vs-the-flu-prevention-and-understanding-the/article_17f057fc-6ae3-11ea-a7b4-07847472467d.html

        As of the writing, the total cases of COVID-19 worldwide were 244,533 people with 10,301 deaths (Johns Hopkins U Med, 2020). In the US there were 14,387 cases with 217 deaths (CDC, 2020). These numbers will certainly increase as more tests become available.

        To date the amount of Flu cases this year is significantly more than COVID-19 with 36-51 million in the US alone and a staggering number of deaths between 22,000-55,000 (CDC, 2020). However, this number of deaths is not atypical in any given year. Last year there were approximately 61,000 deaths due to the seasonal Flu (CDC, 2019). The Flu seems to affect children and adults while COVID-19 targets older individuals, although all are susceptible. Both the Flu and COVID-19 will affect those with immune impairments and or chronic health conditions (heart disease, lung disorders, cancers, diabetes etc.) more harshly.

        Flu and COVID-19 are transmitted best when the individual has symptoms. In rare cases, COVID-19 and Flu can be transmitted in the early stages of the disease in asymptomatic patients when the virus is mounting in the individual’s upper respiratory tract (first 24 hours prior to symptoms). (New England J of Med, 2020)

        The signs and symptoms of the Flu and COVID-19 are similar with fever, cough, and fatigue most commonly. In a study of 55,000 cases of COVID-19, the most common symptoms were fever (88%), dry cough (68%), fatigue (38%), and shortness of breath (19%) (WHO, 2020). The Flu and COVID-19 are spread through water droplets made when people cough, sneeze or talk. The only way the FLU or COVID-19 can be transmitted is though the mouth, nose, and or eyes. If the water droplet (with the virus inside) lands in the mouth, nose, or eyes of people nearby the disorder can be transmitted. These small water droplets are too heavy and to be suspended (airborne) in the air and drops to the ground in less than 3-6 feet. This is why social distancing (6 feet) is integral in stopping the spread of both the Flu and COVID-19. A face mask can help reduce the water droplet from being propelled from the mouth of a sick individual reducing transmission in those who have either virus. Some masks are not of high enough quality to reduce the spread to asymptomatic individuals as a preventative technique. COVID-19 and the Flu are not considered airborne. Some infections are airborne (chickenpox, measles, tuberculous) in which the pathogen is carried on small airborne particulates (dust). In a laboratory setting scientists were able to keep the COVID-19 airborne for up to 3 hours, however, this would be extremely rare in a natural setting. (New England J of Med, 2020)

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      • #2211032
        cmptrgy
        AskWoody Plus

        Not always true, please see

        https://www.askwoody.com/forums/topic/coronavirus-misinformation-on-tv/#post-2209290

        • This reply was modified 2 weeks, 1 day ago by wavy.

        Yesterday I took the time to watch TV and catch many of the medical experts opinions & recommendations

        Among them, there were many recommendations that we wash our hands with soap and water very similar to the article I had posted.
        — You mention “not always true”
        but I had mentioned “My intent is to include what we can do ourselves while everything is whirling around us.”
        — what’s wrong with that if we do at least what we can do?
        Washing our hands with soap and water or using alcohol-based sanitizers doesn’t cure the system but we can be part of being helpful in dealing with the situation at hand.
        — Some of the comments I saw included we touch our faces are a factor.
        In other words let’s do what we can do even though washing our hands as well as the article describes is a positive contribution.

        Naturally social distancing was discussed many times and is so important.
        — And that’s me as that is what I am doing willing.
        You know my Mom died from TB when I was 11-months old. She had been quarantined for some time before she died and I remember the stories of those days.
        — Along the way I had to be tested for TB until I was 12-years old. In addition my Dad was told I’d be lucky to live longer than 12-years old.
        — During my lifetime I was checked for TB due to the requirements of the jobs I had especially when I used to drive patients to doctor and surgery appointments.
        — Anyway, my experience gives me a personal touch of what’s going on and what I (we) can do on our part.

        anonymous post #2210914
        “The only way the FLU or COVID-19 can be transmitted is though the mouth, nose, and or eyes. If the water droplet (with the virus inside) lands in the mouth, nose, or eyes of people nearby the disorder can be transmitted. These small water droplets are too heavy and to be suspended (airborne) in the air and drops to the ground in less than 3-6 feet. This is why social distancing (6 feet) is integral in stopping the spread of both the Flu and COVID-19. A face mask can help reduce the water droplet from being propelled from the mouth of a sick individual reducing transmission in those who have either virus. Some masks are not of high enough quality to reduce the spread to asymptomatic individuals as a preventative technique. COVID-19 and the Flu are not considered airborne. Some infections are airborne (chickenpox, measles, tuberculous) in which the pathogen is carried on small airborne particulates (dust).”
        — Oh yes, I saw all of that mentioned many times yesterday. I’m glad to see how well you described so well. Thank you.

        Yesterday I found
        How the World’s Richest Country Ran Out of a 75-Cent Face Mask
        https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/how-the-worlds-richest-country-ran-out-of-a-75-cent-face-mask/ar-BB11GgLi?ocid=spartandhp
        Yes that shouldn’t have happened but past practices over the years is the main cause behind that.
        The article includes Surgical face masks, N95 respirator masks & protective gear: I doubt those face masks cost only 75 cents.
        — If I’m wrong, I’ll accept that fact but that article doesn’t sort out the differences among those items.
        I didn’t see any references for the average person’s face mask like me and so many others: I don’t know how much it does cost us average persons to purchase a mask as I am socially distancing myself at home but if 75 cents is realistic, I imagine that applies to us average persons.

        Bottom line is I repeat “My intent is to include what we can do ourselves while everything is whirling around us.”

        HP EliteBook 8540w laptop Windows 10 Pro (x64)

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      • #2211045
        Slowpoke47
        AskWoody Plus

        Cannot vouch for this info, sent to me by a friend:

        EDIT uploaded file removed, due to the inaccurate nature of the contents. Please, do not share such information, here or elsewhere! and check information at a reliable source, such as CDC

        Linux Mint Mate 19.2 and Win7 HP

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2211143
          Elly
          AskWoody MVP

          This is common misinformation that is being circulated on social media…

          Viral Social Media Posts Offer False Coronavirus Tips

          One of the ways to check for false news is to check a source. This claims to be from Stanford. An article debunking it was published March 12th in the Verge:

          A viral list of dubious coronavirus tips claims to be from Stanford — it isn’t

          Another false claim being circulated is that Stanford Medicine was involved in a widely circulating Google document or research paper suggesting that chloroquine is a potential treatment for COVID-19. Per their information site:

          Claims that we were involved are false. Please refer to this site for accurate information about COVID-19, and please consult a physician before taking any sort of prescription medication.

          It can be very difficult not to be caught up.

          What does work? Social distancing and frequent hand washing…

          Non-techy Win 10 Pro and Linux Mint experimenter

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        • #2211350
          Paul T
          AskWoody MVP

          And if it’s a document in email then it’s automatically suspect. If it were reliable someone would have published it on a web site and taken responsibility for it.

          cheers, Paul

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2211122
        wavy
        AskWoody Plus

        This is what I was referring to

        Hand washing mechanically removes pathogens, while laboratory data demonstrate that 60% ethanol and 70% isopropanol, the active ingredients in CDC-recommended alcohol-based hand sanitizers, inactivates viruses that are genetically related to, and with similar physical properties as, the 2019-nCoV

        Note the different %s given.

        🍻

        Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
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      • #2211127
        cmptrgy
        AskWoody Plus

        Cannot vouch for this info, sent to me by a friend:

        EDIT uploaded file removed, due to the inaccurate nature of the contents. Please, do not share such information, here or elsewhere! and check information at a reliable source, such as CDC

        I always appreciate new tips.

        Since that information is from Stanford hospital board internal message, I’d say it’s worth knowing about those tips.

        The first paragraph is fine with me. I even experimented holding my breath for 10 seconds.

        Since I have a habit of drinking water during the day I’ll continue to do so as I don’t want to wait until it needs to be determined during a “critical” if it comes to that.

        HP EliteBook 8540w laptop Windows 10 Pro (x64)

        • #2211144
          Elly
          AskWoody MVP

          @cmptrgy- These are false news being circulated on social media. See my Post # 2211143

          Non-techy Win 10 Pro and Linux Mint experimenter

          2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2211361
        Slowpoke47
        AskWoody Plus

        And if it’s a document in email then it’s automatically suspect. If it were reliable someone would have published it on a web site and taken responsibility for it.

        cheers, Paul

        Notice that I posted it with a disclaimer.

        Linux Mint Mate 19.2 and Win7 HP

        • #2211367
          Paul T
          AskWoody MVP

          Instead of posting it you could have checked some of the things it said and then posted a note about some of the rubbish being emailed around?

          cheers, Paul

          2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2211995
        Nathan Parker
        AskWoody_MVP

        Apple released a COVID19 website and app this week:

        https://www.macrumors.com/2020/03/27/apple-covid-19-website-app/

        I downloaded the app. It’s a useful resource with some general information.

        Nathan Parker

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2211997
        Nathan Parker
        AskWoody_MVP

        Siri (as well as Alexa and Google Assistant) are added COVID19 info as well:

        https://www.macrumors.com/2020/03/21/siri-coronavirus-questionnaire/

        Nathan Parker

      • #2212142
        DriftyDonN
        AskWoody Plus
      • #2212187
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Concerning something Wavy quoted further up in this thread ( #2211122 ):

        Hand washing with soap and water does more than remove viruses mechanically: it also for some, including corona viruses such as the one causing COVID-19, destroys their external shell containing both their genes in the form of DNA, or RNA (depending on the type of virus) and the outward facing proteins that open up cells so the internal viral genes can be injected into them, making these cells into something like netbot computers, busily making more viruses until their sheer numbers make the cells burst, killing them and releasing many more viruses to infect many more cells, repeating the process in each of them, in a sort of chain reaction. Washing with soap and water both removes viral particles and damages those that still remain on the skin of the hands and on other surfaces, making them unable to do further harm:

        https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/13/health/soap-coronavirus-handwashing-germs.html

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

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      • #2212801
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        More timely information, from Consumer Reports, on what works and what doesn’t for disinfecting hands and surfaces at home and destroying the COVID-19 virus on them, if any:

        https://www.consumerreports.org/cleaning/common-household-products-that-can-destroy-novel-coronavirus/?EXTKEY=EE034IBAC&utm_source=acxiom&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20200331_cromc_engagewkly

         

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

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